Building a Solid Foundation

Nicholas82555

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I believe if a person can resist the temptation of instant gratification and impatience he/she would build into a formidable opponent. Why the rush, if this is a lifetime commitment?

I believe attention to detail, commitment, perserverance, mind, spirital and body fitness plus character is what makes not only a excellent martial arts not solely based on his/her prowess but personalities. The world already has enough rear-ends.

I had a chance once to cross paths with Grandmaster Gin Foon Mark (Praying Mantis) years ago living in New York such a wealth of knowledge, humility and a person of character.

The notable Joe Lewis (shorin-ryu) karate had trained hard with such dedication that when he did compete in tournaments the side kick and reverse punch would rule the day with devastating accuracy and brutal power. Why can't WCnners have the patience to do the same.

It's like baking a good cake. It takes the right ingredients and time to bake thoroughly. The end product is a taste that is unbelievably good without much comprarison.
 

dosk3n

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Why do you think chunners are not the same? I know I feel the same way.

Skill comes from patience and practice and this is for all arts including WC.

I know that this is a life time thing for me and the longer I do it the better I will become.

However at the same time I know a years worth of training still makes me more skilled than 80% of people.

I feel I can say this as I have lessons 3 times a week and at the end of sil lim tau I do 50 punches and at the end of class. Plus how ever many punches through the class so say an average of 200 punches a class. Thats 600 a week, 2400 a month and 28800 punches a year and thats not even including the training I do on my own.

Most non martial artists would never have punched that much with in a year so you have more experience.

But to back up what you are saying with patience and time and more training over more years that 28800 would become 144000 over 5 years and 230400 over 8 years and that will keep growing until "your cake has cooked" and you have perfected that one thing.

This is why I agree that people shouldnt try to rush and that it takes time. But at the same time you can gain alot of skill over the average person over a short ammount of time like a year.

I guess its 2 sides of a coin, Yin and Yang. You can look at it from both ways.
 

seasoned

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I believe if a person can resist the temptation of instant gratification and impatience he/she would build into a formidable opponent. Why the rush, if this is a lifetime commitment?

I believe attention to detail, commitment, perserverance, mind, spirital and body fitness plus character is what makes not only a excellent martial arts not solely based on his/her prowess but personalities. The world already has enough rear-ends.

I had a chance once to cross paths with Grandmaster Gin Foon Mark (Praying Mantis) years ago living in New York such a wealth of knowledge, humility and a person of character.

The notable Joe Lewis (shorin-ryu) karate had trained hard with such dedication that when he did compete in tournaments the side kick and reverse punch would rule the day with devastating accuracy and brutal power. Why can't WCnners have the patience to do the same.

It's like baking a good cake. It takes the right ingredients and time to bake thoroughly. The end product is a taste that is unbelievably good without much comprarison.
I alway felt that this foundation building pertaining to martial arts is reminiscent to constructing a good sturdy dwelling. While starting with a strong foundation, the finer points of any (building) of a martial artist, should occur later in the process so as to bring out the beauty to it's fullest. Very nice thread you have started.
 
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Nicholas82555

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I'm going to save this one. U wouldn't happen to have a philosophical mind:))) Touche, this one was better than my analogy...props:)
 

Domino

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I read something similar from a lecture Grandmaster Ip Ching gave
"When we learn English, we learn 26 letters first.
If we cannot handle the pronunciation of each letter, then our English will never be good. The magnitude of the first form Sil Lim Tau in Wing Chun is the same as that of the letters in English. If we don't master Sil Lim Tau well, we can never do well in Chum Kiu, Biu Gee and Muk Yan Jong (Wooden Dummy Form). After learning 26 letters, we know how to form a word by grouping some of them. After learning Sil Lim Tau, Chum Kiuand Bil Gee, we know many methods of attack and defense. If we could practise Chi Sau by those methods, it would be the same as if we could make a proper sentence in English. If we could apply those methods in free fighting smoothly, then we could write a passage."

http://www.kwokwingchun.co.uk/forms-applications/ip-ching-on-sil-lim-tau
 

KamonGuy2

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Its true that patience is a key in wing chun. Everyone learns martial arts for different reasons. Some do it for fitness, some do it for discipline, some do it for social reasons, some do it for the art and some do it for the fighting side of it

Within all of these is the temptation to rush techniques in the false hope that you will get better more quickly. Especially of a person is grossly fat, or bad at fighting and getting hassled by thugs etc

As we tried to explain on another post about chi sao - waiting until structures and basics are good helps to ensure that more advanced drills and spars are efficiently performed (as opposed to having a bad base or sloppy strikes)
 

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