Block-Check-Counter Handedness.

arnisador

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In doing the basic block-check-counter drill stick on stick against a #1 strike, you step right, block right, check left, counter right.

In doing the basic block-check-counter drill stick on stick against a #2 strike, you step left, block right, check left, counter right.

In doing the basic block-check-counter drill empty hand on empty hand against a #1 strike, you step right, block right, check left, counter right.

In doing the basic block-check-counter drill empty hand on empty hand against a #2 strike, you step left, block left, check right, counter left.

Or maybe you don't in the last case--maybe you step left, block right, check left, counter right. This is one of the few areas of controversy I've found in the basic techniques: Do you block left because that hand is closer, or block right to keep with the pattern that in arnis we fight the same way whether we have a stick in our hand, a knife in our hand, a sword in our hand, or just our hand? I've found some people strongly believe that we must do it the same as if we had a stick in our hands, but I just feel more comfortable blocking with the forward hand--and for me it comes naturally out of de cadena.
 
Hi,

we in Germany approache the whole thing a little differently. This is due to our basics that have still aspects from Ernesto Presas and come also from your own experiences.
During the Symposium 2003 I will be able to explain and demonstrate this a little bit more in detail.

The whole technique (stick and empty hand) is handeled as follows:

When we are attacked and want to execute a Modern Arnis technique, mailnly in the corto distance, we step forward, to shorten the distance between us and the attack. (When using another distance, we would of course also use other footwork).

As a right-hander you ALWAYS step forward with your right foot, no matter, if you are attacked with strike number 1 or with strike number 2.
As a left-hander you ALWAYS step forward with the left foot, no matter, if you are attacked with strike number 1 or with strike number 2.
This applies, when we practice against sticks. I aready hear "They did not understand the triangle footwork"
Well, I think we did. It does not mean, that we don織t apply the triangle footwork, but we do that mainly, when we practice "classical Arnis". Classical Arnis for us is, when you could substitute the stick for a bladed weapon. This is not the case, when we practice Modern techniqes.
But this goes a little too far for the moment. If someone has questions to that, we can open it as another topic.

More interesting is the question, why are we doing it this way:
First of all, when you are right handed and hold the stick, the stick is always closer to the opponent, when you are with the right foot forward, than with the left foot. For we want to block with the minimum amount of effort, we try to minimize the distance we have to cover. So we can block faster because the distance is shorter.
Then it has something to do with reaction time.This way, you only see that you are attacked and step forward, as a right hander always with the right foot. You don織t have to think and decide: right or left foot, you always just step forward with the right foot, no matter if attack 1 or 2 is executed.

For all those, who shake their head when they read it, because they have only beed doing the triangle footwork: first of all, the triangle footwork is good against a single strike attack. But try this in your training:
I would like your partner to attack you as fast as he can with the numbers 1, 2 and again 1. Or 2, 1, 2. This should be possible within about 1 (one) second.
Then I would like to see you doing the triangle footwork during all 3 attacks (and perhaps he even strikes 4 or 5 times). If you try, you are too late usually after the 2nd strike, latest after the 3rd, and then you are standing definitively in a wrong position.

Try it and tell about the results.
When we tried it, we found the triangle footwork to be not possible for this kind of scenario.
When you step forward with the same leg, you only have to shift the arms from block from number 1 to number 2 and back again, without any footwork becoming necessary, beacuse the footwork for strike 1 and 2 is identical and you are inside and have shortened the angle.
This involves less body movement, less use of energy, so all together a better economy of motion.
And if the students have mastered this, they have to apply the same technique with the stick in the other hand, empty hand with the other hand first. (right handed: right block, left brush, right strike, left handen left block, right brush, left strike.)
When you have mastered this, then it is only a matter of which hand is closer because you have been training to use both techniques.

All of this, sticks and empty hands, is practised as a technique as well as in drills, for autoimatisation.

It is a little hard to describe at the keyboard without being able to demonstrate and let the people experiment, but give it a try and tell about the results.

If I it i did not explain good enough, feel free to aks.

Best regards from Germany

Dieter Kn羹ttel,
DATU of Modern Arnis
 
Thanks Mr. Kn羹ttel, this is interesting! When you step forward for a #2 strike, do you still step forward right on a 45 degree angle, just as for #1? If so are you doing more of a roof block under the strike? I see your logic of forward foot for a rapid succession of strikes but I'm having a bit of trouble picturing where you're stepping.
 
Hi,

I am stepping straight forward towards the attacker. Exactly the same step with any of the attacks. The block is a normal block, stick points stright um, the left hand either supports the stick or checks at the attacking hand or (advanced) grabs the stick of the attacker directly. But this needs a special kind of blocking technique with an extremly good timing.

If it is a more diagonal downward attack or a high attack number 2, then it could be a kind of a r
oofblock too, but in the beginner stage it is more the straight upward block.

When more advanced, it is not so important any more, which block you use. Imortant is the position and the saved time, that you get from being there already.

There would be more to say, but it is really hard via the kleyboard on the net. So it is perhaps easier, that you try it out and ask or tell what you experienced, than me writing an eassay, that nobody is interested in.


By the way, we also execute the strikes a little different, (with wrist motion), have the Sinawali executed the way, that you train exactly the strikes you need and have the
disarming techniques, that were a topic in another thread, structured in a way, that it is VERY easy to remember.

All of this and many more aspects of Modern Arnis, you can find on my Modern Arnis instructional videos.

You find informations on my homepage

http://www.abanico.de/html_e/index_e.html

and then hit the Modern Arnis button.
English NTSC versions for the US are available.

But this should not stop the discussion about the techniques here.

Looking forward for more replies.

Best regards from Gemany



Dieter Kn羹ttel
Datu of Modern Arnis
 
Arnisador,

I think you answered your own question. It is a BASIC BlockCheckCounter. Since it is a BASIC drill I would stay with the stick to emptyhand translation, just for the fact things start to get too freeform before students have the basics. Later on in training, usually when the same drill is done with double stick, either stick can start the sequence. Then it will be easier for the student to relate empty hand to double stick. In the end it is whatever stick or hand can better intercept depending on where your hands are or end up.
 
I think your answer makes a lot of sense arnisandyz, and especially the double stick part and the fact that it's only a basic, beginner's drill.

Mr. Kn羹ttel, would it be appropriate to say that you're trying to smother/jam the attack with your movement? What you're saying reminds me of entering in solo baston in some ways. As you say, it's hard to clearly discuss these things in this medium!
 
On empty hand #2 block if you step left, block left, check right, counter left, it puts you in close and your left hand strike is a short distance away from your opponents face. If you step left, block right, check left, and counter right, when you step left on an angle this brings your right shoulder at the furthest distance from your opponents face and it's a long throw either with a hook or an overhand right. Still stepping left and lead blocking left your left shoulder is right in opponents midsection. Stepping straight in would bring either hand at the same distance to the target but puts you right in the guys face. If your reaction time is good from this distance, go for it. :boxing:
 
If you think about the empty hand defense off of #2 - step left - parry right - check left - hit right - those are basic elements that are in the hubad lubad pattern , parry left - check right is in the hubad, also step right (inside) check left, palisut right (to get to the outside) is there. Destructions can be found in the flow as well as hitting on the off beat as well as elbow wrenches and takedowns. Its all there, just have to look for it.

Gotta love the hubad.

I think the original post however is about BASICS and training people who haven't experienced the variations yet get a feel for block(hit) - check - counter with a dominate weapon hand. Next progression might be putting the stick in the left hand, then doing the technique with a knife to train range. Then stick and knife (basically the same thing as you still have a dominant hand with the long weapon), then finally double stick. These more advanced drills (especially hubad and double stick) will bring out all of the other variations we are talking about.

Mr Knuttle made a good point about "Classical vs Modern Arnis". It is a valid point worthy of its own thread. There are just some things you can do against a stick that you can't do against a blade. Hence the more complex and geometric footwork in most Kali systems vs the Arnis, more "balintiwak" intercepting straight forward style. I say be able to do both!
 
Mr. Kn羹ttel, would it be appropriate to say that you're trying to smother/jam the attack with your movement? What you're saying reminds me of entering in solo baston in some ways.

Yes, it is a kind of jamming.
Not necessarily to the point that you are in the grappling range, but could. At least you are standing closer to the attacker after the step than he would expect. Depending on that distance you can apply different defese-techniques like counters, combinations, disarms, locks, takedowns etc..

When you step forward for a #2 strike, do you still step forward right on a 45 degree angle, just as for #1?

We (mostly) don織t step 45 degree forward on a number 1 when we do Modern Arnis. We do that mainly in classical Arnis.
When you step 45 degree, you still are in the same distance, meaning for the attacker, that his reaching is still correct.
In the classical system Hirada Batanguenia, we ALWAYS step forward 45 degrees with the right foot, even on a number 2 angle. Then you apply a kind of a roof block and parry the stick over your head.

But in other classical styles we use other footwork. It all boils down, that you get the skill for the different possibilities and know, when you can apply what. If you are experienced then, the technique will come spontaneously and it is for selfedefensde not any more important if you do it right or left or whatever. You have learned the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques and then it is up to you to use it appropriately.


Best regards form Germany

Dieter Kn羹ttel
Datu of Modern Arnis
 

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