Best side kick I have seen on Youtube

dvcochran

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Here's another difference between the two major Taekwondo.


Less pivot of the base foot in ITF for textbook dolyo chagi -=better form, less power


Can you Not see that the kicker is standing Way off center from the target? There is no need for a lot of pivot.
I have no idea what the video was intended for.
 

Bruce7

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That is a Karate Kick. That is the kekomi version of yoko geri.
It is not uncommon for common techniques to have different names in different arts.
It is not uncommon for common techniques to be included in different arts.

If you want to get technical... yoko geri has been a part of the karate curriculum since before TKD was a thing. And TKDs roots go back to Shotokan Karate. Funakoshi was teaching yoko geri long before he ever taught yoko geri to General Choi.

TKDs roots go back to Shotokan Karate. Funakoshi was teaching yoko geri long before he ever taught yoko geri to General Choi.
I agree with your post. Bill Wallace (Karate) has a beautiful side kick.

IMO TKD puts more importance on the fully chamber side kick than other arts. So when see a fully chambered side kick we normal think TKD.
 

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Two things.

First, a few have said it's not a 10 or implied it's not great. I'm interested to hear some critique. I mean, for the uneducated person like me, what's wrong with it?

Second, when I saw the title for the thread, I thought first of sidekick in the superhero sense, and thought this would be a video of someone cosplaying Robin or something. :D

Allow me to assist, if I may. :)

Imagine someone posting an Americana, but with only one person being shown, doing it on air. Im sure there would be a lot of comments of what was right or wrong, maybe what branch of teaching it came from, probably even this should be wider or that should be whatever.

You probably wouldn't look at it twice. I wouldn't either.

Its a sidekick. Cool. Nothing wrong with it. Now do something with it.
 

Earl Weiss

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No. A Side kick always uses the heel. It is shown in every example and used consistently in every school style of side kick I have ever seen; assuming it is being performed correctly.
There are variations that use different parts of the foot but they usually go by a slightly different name as well.
The mechanics getting to the strike may be taught differently but the strike is definitely done with the heel.
Sir, I am not certain if your "Always uses the heel" is meant to refer to "Always" in a particular system. Karate Do Kyo Han references "Outside Edge of foot" And the Chang Hon system uses approximately the rear third (closest to the heel) "Foot Sword" edge of the foot. In the Chang Hon system, the Bottom of the Heel (Called "Back Sole" in the system) is no used . (As an aside the system uses the "Heel" to describe the Back of the heel used in reverse hook and reverse turning kicks. )
 

Earl Weiss

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I really don't see how you can suggest that a pizza made in a middle eastern restaurant by latino chefs in america is italian. The inspiration for it may be italian, but that pizza sure ain't.
Sir, not sure if your post is tongue in cheek. Are you saying this because it is likely not what you would find in Italy? Perhaps so. More accurately you would have a Latin cook, in a middle eastern restaurant making an "Italian American" Pizza.
 

dvcochran

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Sir, I am not certain if your "Always uses the heel" is meant to refer to "Always" in a particular system. Karate Do Kyo Han references "Outside Edge of foot" And the Chang Hon system uses approximately the rear third (closest to the heel) "Foot Sword" edge of the foot. In the Chang Hon system, the Bottom of the Heel (Called "Back Sole" in the system) is no used . (As an aside the system uses the "Heel" to describe the Back of the heel used in reverse hook and reverse turning kicks. )
Sir, I agree. Some of the 'Always' response was in regards to the individual posting. However I did mention there are different names for side kicks as you also mentioned but I did not include the use of different parts of the foot. I did not consider the back of the heel used in a hook kick. That was a good catch to mention.
 

Earl Weiss

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But as far as textbook deliveries, ITF promotes cleaner recovery positions and torso placement wheras KKW has an emphasis on power.
IMO this depends on context. Patterns are one context, sparring a second, and breaking a third.
 

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Sir, not sure if your post is tongue in cheek. Are you saying this because it is likely not what you would find in Italy? Perhaps so. More accurately you would have a Latin cook, in a middle eastern restaurant making an "Italian American" Pizza.
It was intended to be a lighthearted way of making a real point which is that the pizza is not italian. I disagree with your fundamental premise. It may still be a pizza, but it's no longer an italian pizza. I don't even know how you could call it italian american.

We have a place locally that serves sushi, but it's not japanese sushi by any stretch of the imagination. It's in the same family of dishes, but any similarity to japanese sushi is superficial, at best.
 

dvcochran

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It was intended to be a lighthearted way of making a real point which is that the pizza is not italian. I disagree with your fundamental premise. It may still be a pizza, but it's no longer an italian pizza. I don't even know how you could call it italian american.

We have a place locally that serves sushi, but it's not japanese sushi by any stretch of the imagination. It's in the same family of dishes, but any similarity to japanese sushi is superficial, at best.
Okay, but does your place sell oatmeal or raw fish? Sushi by any other name...
Why anyone wants to eat raw fish is beyond me. Vile, just vile.
 
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IMO this depends on context. Patterns are one context, sparring a second, and breaking a third.

I don't know enough about breaking but it looks overlap with the other two. There doesn't look to be massive differences in mechanics
 

Earl Weiss

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It may still be a pizza, but it's no longer an italian pizza. I don't even know how you could call it italian american.

t.
Sir, I don't know where you are located, but there is a "Great Debate" mostly by those who live in the respective regions. Over which is better "New York" or "Chicago" Pizza neither of which is quite like I found in Italy, so "Italian American" was a term encompassing the variations on Italian food (and other ethnic foods i.e. "Mexican American" ) so if you have a better way of categorizing common American versions of ethnic dishes, please let me know.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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Sir, I don't know where you are located, but there is a "Great Debate" mostly by those who live in the respective regions. Over which is better "New York" or "Chicago" Pizza neither of which is quite like I found in Italy, so "Italian American" was a term encompassing the variations on Italian food (and other ethnic foods i.e. "Mexican American" ) so if you have a better way of categorizing common American versions of ethnic dishes, please let me know.
Just to clarify, Chicago "pizza" isn't actually pizza. it's a pie. It's not a debate of which is better, one of them just doesn't fit the term-it'd be like calling a grilled cheese sandwich pizza.
 

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Sir, I don't know where you are located, but there is a "Great Debate" mostly by those who live in the respective regions. Over which is better "New York" or "Chicago" Pizza neither of which is quite like I found in Italy, so "Italian American" was a term encompassing the variations on Italian food (and other ethnic foods i.e. "Mexican American" ) so if you have a better way of categorizing common American versions of ethnic dishes, please let me know.
First, I really don't know where this "sir" thing came from. I would prefer you don't use that when you talk to me, if you don't mind.

Second, regarding the Chicago vs New York pizza debate, the question is which one is the best American pizza, neither of which is Italian. And it's really not a question, because the Chicago version is a pie... or maybe a casserole, if you're being generous.

Think about it like this. In America, we have a lot of labels that we use to categorize food. The labels are often based on national origin (e.g., Italian or Chinese) but can also sometimes be a derivative or regional (e.g., Tex-Mex, Southern, or California Cuisine) or something else entirely (e.g., comfort food). The key here is to recognize that these are nothing more than labels.

Often, even when there is a national origin associated with the food, the actual dishes served barely resemble the inspiration. Italian and Chinese restaurants are well known for this, meaning when you go into a Chinese restaurant, you're very likely getting food that is not authentic to China. However, they aren't Italian or Chinese.

Okay. Stay with me here. Last point. In America, we actually have a term that we use when a restaurant is getting closer to its roots: authentic. When an American restaurant does things that are the same as their origin, we call that authentic food. So, when an Italian restaurant actually serves a dish that is the same as in Italy, it could be called an authentic dish. Still not Italian. It's an American dish that is authentic. This is even true when the origin is American. You can make "authentic Cajun" food. Or you can make Jambalya out of a box by Zattaran's, or you can fall somewhere in between. While this would all be American food, but it wouldn't actually be Cajun food, though it may be an authentic representation.
 

Steve

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This might help. When we use the term "pizza", are we speaking English or Italian? What about sushi. Am I suddenly speaking Japanese? I don't think so. I don't speak Japanese or Italian. Words are symbols for things. And in different languages, the same word can evoke very different things. In extreme cases, the meanings can be completely different. But even if it's a borrowed word, like sushi, the symbol stands for something different.

And, in fact, the term "sushi" in English (and in particular in America), refers to something similar to what it means in Japan, but it's not the same. The practical effect of this is that if I say to an American, "hey, let's get some sushi" and they have in mind an American sushi but I take them someplace authentically Japanese, they will probably be surprised, and may not like it at all.
 

dvcochran

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This might help. When we use the term "pizza", are we speaking English or Italian? What about sushi. Am I suddenly speaking Japanese? I don't think so. I don't speak Japanese or Italian. Words are symbols for things. And in different languages, the same word can evoke very different things. In extreme cases, the meanings can be completely different. But even if it's a borrowed word, like sushi, the symbol stands for something different.

And, in fact, the term "sushi" in English (and in particular in America), refers to something similar to what it means in Japan, but it's not the same. The practical effect of this is that if I say to an American, "hey, let's get some sushi" and they have in mind an American sushi but I take them someplace authentically Japanese, they will probably be surprised, and may not like it at all.
Again, it is raw fish. What does it matter if is has a fancy-ish name or if someone uses 'sushi' to describe raw fish?
 

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Are we already at the point where there are more posts about food than about sidekicks??? ;)

Btw, I'm German and I like pineapple on pizza. :)

Anyway, it's interesting some people here like to go off topic, hijack threads or aks/answer Taekwondo questions with examples from/showing other martial arts. :D
 
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One thing I noticed with Karate, especially old school like Shotokan, is that they often bend their base foot like crazy when they kick which we don't do in TKD. It's bad for mobility and looks uglier
 

Earl Weiss

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First, I really don't know where this "sir" thing came from. I would prefer you don't use that when you talk to me, if you don't mind.

.
The "Sir" thing comes from years of operating in a TKD environment that stressed "Courtesy" as the first and most important Tenet of TK-D.
 
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