Best Boxer's Defenses Against the Shoot?

Jonathan Randall

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Best Boxer's Defenses Against the Shoot? I know the boxing stance makes us particularly vulnerable to a front leg takedown. What are some good defenses for boxers to learn and practice for (while boxing) against MMA, Wrestling, BJJ, etc. front leg takedowns and takedowns overall? Thanks.
 

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Unless it's possible for them (the boxer) to get off a strike to the face or a knee, I'd have to say learning how to sprawl would be their best option.

Mike
 

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Work on their sprawl and on getting back up "loaded", by that I mean throw punches while getting back up. How we drill it: the wrestler shoots, when the boxer sprawls he braces his lead forearm on the crook of the sprawlers neck so that whe he gets up he can control the shooter a bit and throw a few punches or kicks. It's realy hard to just stop hit a good shoot, sprawling is a lot safer.
Watch any Lidell fight for a good example of a boxers defence aganst a wrestler
 

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I agree with what's already been said. I think you're gonna have a hard time finding a defense in boxing that will do as well against the shot as sprawling.
 

Cruentus

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I pretty much agree with what was said.

Tight hooks (punches) and uppercuts for while he is closing, keep your weight centered low, sprawl and pound, and get back up "loaded" (like that one, first time I heard the term) if he try's to recover.
 
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Jonathan Randall

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MJS said:
Unless it's possible for them (the boxer) to get off a strike to the face or a knee, I'd have to say learning how to sprawl would be their best option.

Mike

I was worried you folks were going to say that. OTH, how many first class grapplers am I going to enounter in RL? Truly, I wanted to be able to stay on my feet! You're right though - I need to work on my sprawl.

Thanks all.
 

Kembudo-Kai Kempoka

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I have a little different take on it. Lower your body by doing a half-squat, and keep with your boxing. Your natural weapons are too high to be effective against someone at a lower altitude, so lower yours to put your hands at the same level as their head. We used to do good-guy/bad-guy drills, with one dude wearing 16 ouce gloves, and the other just doing shoots. One of our crew (a BJJ blue belt who was also an old Jet Center kickboxer under Benny Urquidez & clan) discovered this, and once we started all doing it, it made the drill a whole lot harder. To give some context around it, we even made it hard for a Gracie brother to complete a shoot by doing this. Half squat, and box from there.

Good luck,

Dave
 

Cruentus

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Jonathan Randall said:
I was worried you folks were going to say that. OTH, how many first class grapplers am I going to enounter in RL? Truly, I wanted to be able to stay on my feet! You're right though - I need to work on my sprawl.

Thanks all.

Yea, dude if your training for an actual self-defense encounter, you have to learn some grappling, period, or else you will be seriously handicapped.

In unarmed combat, it is very common for someone to drive up the middle and hug, pushing you into stuff like walls or cars or straight to the ground. A double-leg take down is also common as hell. These are all common especially with bigger guys. People are doing this WITHOUT A HIGH LEVEL OF TRAINING. So, the sprawl, as well as some grappling training is really important even if your never going to compete.

Paul
 
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Jonathan Randall

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Tulisan said:
Yea, dude if your training for an actual self-defense encounter, you have to learn some grappling, period, or else you will be seriously handicapped.

In unarmed combat, it is very common for someone to drive up the middle and hug, pushing you into stuff like walls or cars or straight to the ground. A double-leg take down is also common as hell. These are all common especially with bigger guys. People are doing this WITHOUT A HIGH LEVEL OF TRAINING. So, the sprawl, as well as some grappling training is really important even if your never going to compete.

Paul

Good points, Paul.

Actually, I started my martial arts journey in Judo, so I am not unfamiliar with grappling. However, my last Judo class was years before the first UFC so, while I combined boxing, Judo and TKD classes while in college, I never put them together into a coordinated set such as you see in current MMA. I am not helpless on the ground and I have a few surprises for all but a well trained fighter there, but I really, really, I would like to be able to stay on my toes if at all possible. It's not always, of course.
 

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Jonathan Randall said:
I am not helpless on the ground and I have a few surprises for all but a well trained fighter there, but I really, really, I would like to be able to stay on my toes if at all possible. It's not always, of course.

I'm sure you've heard this before, but if you want to stay on your feet you need to know some groundwork. That way it is not unfamiliar to you.
 

Hand Sword

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I say sprawling too. Boxers have quick movement, which helps also, but aren't used to attacks against their legs. So, I would add training against that too, at least to make it familiar mentally, so as to not get that deer in the headlights syndrome.
 

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Agree.

Sprawling is the main defense for any stand up fighter.

Keep those hips on top, throw short shovel hooks/upper-cuts with you power hand as you lead hand maintains contact and you drive you hips down.

Dont be alive on your toes, sprawl with your insteps to mat so traction cant happen on the mat with the balls of your feet.

Understand that your punches will more then likely be "arm punches" which is fine you just want to defend the shoot not knock him out (although it will happen).

When you push his chest to mat, make your decision - ground and pound or regain your footing.

Its just a general guide.

Cage match will change this because you will hit a wall and be stopped from sliding backwards.

Use your hips (core strength) against his arm strength. Pretty important.

Not a hard and fast rule, but its been said welll above, just wanted to say my perspective.
 

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I like a half-sprawl with low elbows. keeps some distance and you still have mobility in your legs to throw punches. of course, I am a wrestler myself so this may be easier for wrestlers to do.
 

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