Basic tools for all striking art

gpseymour

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But the pushing is so easy to be countered. If your opponent grabs on your wrist, his body and your body are connected as one unit, you can't push him back.

This is why in Taiji pushing hand, grabbing is not allowed. The grabbing by itself can destroy all the pushing game.

This is also why ground game can happen in a Judo game. When you throw your opponent, your opponent will drag you down with him.

A: As long as I keep moving back and remain distance, none of your MA technique will work on me.
B: As long as I can grab on you, when you move back, you will pull me into you.

In the following clip, the reason that one can push the other because grabbing is not allowed.


In this clip, one can't push the other back because the grabbing.

body-strike.gif
Grabbing a wrist or arm doesn’t entirely negate the effects of a shove, nor the possibility of it. A properly timed shove, with a bit of help, can disengage that grip along the way.
 

drop bear

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But the pushing is so easy to be countered. If your opponent grabs on your wrist, his body and your body are connected as one unit, you can't push him back.

This is why in Taiji pushing hand, grabbing is not allowed. The grabbing by itself can destroy all the pushing game.

This is also why ground game can happen in a Judo game. When you throw your opponent, your opponent will drag you down with him.

A: As long as I keep moving back and remain distance, none of your MA technique will work on me.
B: As long as I can grab on you, when you move back, you will pull me into you.

In the following clip, the reason that one can push the other because grabbing is not allowed.


In this clip, one can't push the other back because the grabbing.

body-strike.gif

It is as fast as a punch. And it sits very low and doesn't travel very far.

It is a straight up bastard to catch. You prevent it by mot being in range.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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Then I win, as I practice self defense
When somebody attacks your love one, your method won't work.

This is why I don't like the term "self-defense". It's a very selfish term. As long as I'm OK, I don't care about what can happen to the others.

Fight, you may die, run, you live, at least for a while, and die in your bed many years from now ...

 
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Gweilo

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When somebody attacks your love one, your method won't work.

This is why I don't like the term "self-defense". It's a very selfish term. As long as I'm OK, I don't care about what can happen to the others.

Oh I agree, if a loved one cannot defend themselves, its their problem, but if you could put yourself at risk, to save 10, 100, 1000, would you do it ?
 

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His Penny Loafers never moved. Probably a one in a hundred shot, but still talked about today by the people who were there. It was a good shove.
I have to say, I agree with that... Good shove, indeed.

Probably more effective than a group of other strikes and whatnot you could have used, too, eh?
 

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I have to say, I agree with that... Good shove, indeed.

Probably more effective than a group of other strikes and whatnot you could have used, too, eh?

Lol. Ya, kinda'.

See, here's the thing. Ed Parker always used to tell me...

EdParkerQuote.jpg


I wasn't even sure what that meant at the time. Especially the "to see is to be deceived" part. I mean, heck, if I see it with my own eyes, that's good enough for me. Or so I thought back then.

I became a rookie cop while in my thirties. We had a great indoor gun range and a crusty old Rangemaster that we all loved. At the time I already had a permit to carry, and thought I was pretty well trained. I was on the range, broke for lunch, then was called on the intercom to come back.

I walk in and the lights are off, but the overhead spotlights are on and focused on three things. The backstop has two blue balloons taped up there, about eight feet apart.

In the middle of the range there's a short podium with a savage looking sword thingy sticking into the top of it. It looked like something you would use to behead cows.

At the firing line is a chair, the Rangemaster sitting in it looking into a spotting scope. He gets up, goes to the podium sword thing, and adjusts it ever so slightly. Says to me, "I'm going to fire one round, hit that blade, split the bullet in two and hit both those balloons." And I'm thinking, "yeah right."

He goes to sit back in the chair, but does so backwards, and picks up a woman's old fashioned mirror, one of those oval ones with a handle. He puts his firearm, a thirty eight long barrel revolver, resting over his shoulder to the target - we both have on ear protection - holds up the mirror with his other hand....takes careful aim and fires, shattering both balloons. I damn near crapped myself. I had never seen anything like that. He says "go back and finish your lunch, trainee."

I go back to the lounge telling the other guys, "Gino just made the greatest F'n shot I've ever seen! He had these two balloons and - the place just explodes into laughter.

They say, "go back down the range, rookie." So back down I go. There's Gino, who says to me, "Are all karate guys as dumb as you, or are you special?"

He goes to the backstop, puts up two more balloons, and says, "Fire right between them"
I do and both balloons explode. He says, "the bullet shatters into fragments, that's what broke the balloons. You have to investigate everything, even if you see it. The very first thing I thought was Ed Parker "to see is to be deceived".

So, fifteen years later I'm the DT guy there. And when I taught, watching the guys work things on each other was not good enough. They had to do it on me while I resisted, I had to feel if it was working. I find that there's just no other way.

So I'm teaching them how to shove. Kinetic linking up from your root, you know the deal. And it works especially well with a shove. Epic even. It was a new officer's class. In the class was a kid, Brian, helluva' nice young man. His nickname was beef. He was one seriously strong guy. We went on to become law enforcement partners, still in contact today.

I'm trying to get him to shove me, hard. But he's going easy. Even though I'm light, I don't get moved easy, especially if I don't want to.
Now I start yelling at him, pushing him - and he finally shoves me. Perfectly

I fly back about six feet into the wall, which is only sheet rock. Where I go right through the layer of sheet rock and get stuck there. Like a cartoon. It takes two guys to yank me out. The wall has that cartoon image of a man's body, arms and legs akimbo. To feel is to believe.

I wish they hadn't fixed that hole. They should have framed the damn thing.
 

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Lol. Ya, kinda'.

See, here's the thing. Ed Parker always used to tell me...

View attachment 22944

I wasn't even sure what that meant at the time. Especially the "to see is to be deceived" part. I mean, heck, if I see it with my own eyes, that's good enough for me. Or so I thought back then.

I became a rookie cop while in my thirties. We had a great indoor gun range and a crusty old Rangemaster that we all loved. At the time I already had a permit to carry, and thought I was pretty well trained. I was on the range, broke for lunch, then was called on the intercom to come back.

I walk in and the lights are off, but the overhead spotlights are on and focused on three things. The backstop has two blue balloons taped up there, about eight feet apart.

In the middle of the range there's a short podium with a savage looking sword thingy sticking into the top of it. It looked like something you would use to behead cows.

At the firing line is a chair, the Rangemaster sitting in it looking into a spotting scope. He gets up, goes to the podium sword thing, and adjusts it ever so slightly. Says to me, "I'm going to fire one round, hit that blade, split the bullet in two and hit both those balloons." And I'm thinking, "yeah right."

He goes to sit back in the chair, but does so backwards, and picks up a woman's old fashioned mirror, one of those oval ones with a handle. He puts his firearm, a thirty eight long barrel revolver, resting over his shoulder to the target - we both have on ear protection - holds up the mirror with his other hand....takes careful aim and fires, shattering both balloons. I damn near crapped myself. I had never seen anything like that. He says "go back and finish your lunch, trainee."

I go back to the lounge telling the other guys, "Gino just made the greatest F'n shot I've ever seen! He had these two balloons and - the place just explodes into laughter.

They say, "go back down the range, rookie." So back down I go. There's Gino, who says to me, "Are all karate guys as dumb as you, or are you special?"

He goes to the backstop, puts up two more balloons, and says, "Fire right between them"
I do and both balloons explode. He says, "the bullet shatters into fragments, that's what broke the balloons. You have to investigate everything, even if you see it. The very first thing I thought was Ed Parker "to see is to be deceived".

So, fifteen years later I'm the DT guy there. And when I taught, watching the guys work things on each other was not good enough. They had to do it on me while I resisted, I had to feel if it was working. I find that there's just no other way.

So I'm teaching them how to shove. Kinetic linking up from your root, you know the deal. And it works especially well with a shove. Epic even. It was a new officer's class. In the class was a kid, Brian, helluva' nice young man. His nickname was beef. He was one seriously strong guy. We went on to become law enforcement partners, still in contact today.

I'm trying to get him to shove me, hard. But he's going easy. Even though I'm light, I don't get moved easy, especially if I don't want to.
Now I start yelling at him, pushing him - and he finally shoves me. Perfectly

I fly back about six feet into the wall, which is only sheet rock. Where I go right through the layer of sheet rock and get stuck there. Like a cartoon. It takes two guys to yank me out. The wall has that cartoon image of a man's body, arms and legs akimbo. To feel is to believe.

I wish they hadn't fixed that hole. They should have framed the damn thing.
Great story, which reminds me... but this isn't a "shove" story, so you'll need to keep the sheetrock in mind.

TKD, coming up through the colored belt ranks. ATA, but a relatively fierce (I found out later "traditionalist" in training, so we ... ah... hit a bit harder than the usual ATA club -- my instructor eventually got called out on that).

Friday nights were sparring night, so the whole class is set up around sparring, only green belt and up. The instructor himself was a 2nd degree, he had a buddy who came up with him who didn't go the instructor route who was 1st degree, and a couple high school seniors (I was 20 at the time) who were 1st degrees at the class... and one "older guy" (I bet he wasn't even 40 at the time, maybe 35 looking back on it).

Anyway, the typical round-robin structure, class going and going, people leaving as they got tired (which just isn't me) and I work my way through my instor and his buddy, both of them successfully head-hunting me and me getting frustrated... I'm oh so slowly figuring out what the hell I'm doing wrong... blah - blah - blah... round robin continues.

Ge throught he high school guys (cool guys) taking some marks and delivering some others, so things improving.

Get to the older dude and I'd been working through a setup combo trying to get a spin-hook to actually "work," which wasn't my natural kick I thought, that being a spinning side kick which was pretty powerful.

Um.. remember when I said we did a bit more contact than someplaces....

Long story short, the older dude tryed to Zig me when he thought I was going to Zag, I predicted his Zig and fired not the spin-hook he'd been seeing all night but the spin-side and I picked him off the ground and put him "in" the wall about 4 feet away. He actually got stuck, like you said above, inside the wall with his feet off the floor and arms sort of held by the drywall..

I was like "Well, lookit that!" Then "Huh... maybe I shouldn't have done that..." and then as the instructor walked over a sort of "Oh, sh!*... now I'm gonna get it..."

He turned around, sort of frowning and said, "Do you know how much a sheet of sheetrock costs?"

I had the store deliver a sheet the next day. Delivery cost more than the piece.

I can't really say I "learned a lesson" or anything, though. 3 weeks later I did the same combo ending up with the kick lofting my opponent over the 1st row of sideline spectators/competitors (y'all know how we used to crowd the ring to watch back in the day).
 

Buka

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Great story, which reminds me... but this isn't a "shove" story, so you'll need to keep the sheetrock in mind.

TKD, coming up through the colored belt ranks. ATA, but a relatively fierce (I found out later "traditionalist" in training, so we ... ah... hit a bit harder than the usual ATA club -- my instructor eventually got called out on that).

Friday nights were sparring night, so the whole class is set up around sparring, only green belt and up. The instructor himself was a 2nd degree, he had a buddy who came up with him who didn't go the instructor route who was 1st degree, and a couple high school seniors (I was 20 at the time) who were 1st degrees at the class... and one "older guy" (I bet he wasn't even 40 at the time, maybe 35 looking back on it).

Anyway, the typical round-robin structure, class going and going, people leaving as they got tired (which just isn't me) and I work my way through my instor and his buddy, both of them successfully head-hunting me and me getting frustrated... I'm oh so slowly figuring out what the hell I'm doing wrong... blah - blah - blah... round robin continues.

Ge throught he high school guys (cool guys) taking some marks and delivering some others, so things improving.

Get to the older dude and I'd been working through a setup combo trying to get a spin-hook to actually "work," which wasn't my natural kick I thought, that being a spinning side kick which was pretty powerful.

Um.. remember when I said we did a bit more contact than someplaces....

Long story short, the older dude tryed to Zig me when he thought I was going to Zag, I predicted his Zig and fired not the spin-hook he'd been seeing all night but the spin-side and I picked him off the ground and put him "in" the wall about 4 feet away. He actually got stuck, like you said above, inside the wall with his feet off the floor and arms sort of held by the drywall..

I was like "Well, lookit that!" Then "Huh... maybe I shouldn't have done that..." and then as the instructor walked over a sort of "Oh, sh!*... now I'm gonna get it..."

He turned around, sort of frowning and said, "Do you know how much a sheet of sheetrock costs?"

I had the store deliver a sheet the next day. Delivery cost more than the piece.

I can't really say I "learned a lesson" or anything, though. 3 weeks later I did the same combo ending up with the kick lofting my opponent over the 1st row of sideline spectators/competitors (y'all know how we used to crowd the ring to watch back in the day).

Love it!

Ain't Martial Arts a grand thing?
 

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