Aikido - You know it's real when you see smiles like this.

JowGaWolf

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I really enjoy seeing people experience martial arts like this. It looks like the Aikido guy needs more sparring practice. One of the things I've notice with Aikido is that there's no technique or method to trick or guide your opponent to grab you in the way you need to them to grab you. I think Aikido will have more success if they can fill that gap in. Set up the grab vs trying to react to random grabs.

 

jayoliver00

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I really enjoy seeing people experience martial arts like this. It looks like the Aikido guy needs more sparring practice.

He looked ok for an Aikidoka that's like 120 lbs. Kikuno's probably 170 and was decent in the UFC; which is still miles & miles over that of a non fighter Martial Artist.
 
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JowGaWolf

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He looked ok for an Aikidoka that's like 120 lbs. Kikuno's probably 170 and was decent in the UFC; which is still miles & miles over that of a non fighter Martial Artist.
I like that the sparring was honest and that the Aikidoka was given opportunities to try to work the technique within realistic parameters. I hope he shows another sparring session after he has a chance to review and recalculate. You can tell he was getting gassed lol. He better work on that cardio a little more. Good thing is that he as an opportunity to be better because he sparred.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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I don't like the way that he grabs on his opponent's wrist with his tiger mouth facing toward his opponent (at 1.29).

In MA, you have to think at least 1 step ahead. When you grab on your opponent's wrist like that, your opponent will rotate his arm against your thumb. This will put his arm inside and on top of your arm. That will be to your dis-advantage.
 
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JowGaWolf

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I don't like the way that he grabs on his opponent's wrist with his tiger mouth facing toward his opponent (at 1.29).

In MA, you have to think at least 1 step ahead. When you grab on your opponent's wrist like that, your opponent will rotate his arm against your thumb. This will put his arm inside and on top of your arm. That will be to your dis-advantage.
depends on who your opponent is. I would assume that it wouldn't be as big of a risk agains someone who has no experience in grappling.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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depends on who your opponent is. I would assume that it wouldn't be as big of a risk agains someone who has no experience in grappling.
It's very risky to assume your opponent doesn't know anything. I like to assume my opponent is always about my level (be able to plan at least 1 step ahead).
 

skribs

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I really enjoy seeing people experience martial arts like this. It looks like the Aikido guy needs more sparring practice. One of the things I've notice with Aikido is that there's no technique or method to trick or guide your opponent to grab you in the way you need to them to grab you. I think Aikido will have more success if they can fill that gap in. Set up the grab vs trying to react to random grabs.

The whole point of the art is self-defense. It's a one-sided affair; your opponent is the aggressor, and you are the defender. It's not about squaring off and seeing who can win. There is no point in being offensive.
 
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JowGaWolf

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It's very risky to assume your opponent doesn't know anything. I like to assume my opponent is always about my level (be able to plan at least 1 step ahead).
You don't have to assume. You will know in about 3-5 seconds after the action starts the skill level of a person. 20 seconds in, you'll have a more accurate idea of the skill level. If someone grabs you in a stupid way then take advantage of it.
 
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JowGaWolf

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The whole point of the art is self-defense. It's a one-sided affair; your opponent is the aggressor, and you are the defender. It's not about squaring off and seeing who can win. There is no point in being offensive.
Not for me. For me, the art of self-defense is to protect one's self either through offensive or defensive means.

I don't wait for the attack to come. I'm more than happy to make offensive move. Some times my offensive move is physical and other times it's non-physical. It can be as simple as taking the offensive by walking to a different area. to avoid danger or as complex and nerve wrecking as standing my ground and not backing down.

If a man was trying to kidnap or beat up a 10 year old girl. People will take the offensive even though they aren't being threaten directly. Some may say by not being offensive, one may be putting your self in future harms way, by standing there watching the girl get beaten or taken. You may serve time for not trying to help. A vigilante may decide to deal with you themselves.

If a person walked into a room with a gun you have 2 options. You can either go on the offensive or wait see if the guy will shoot up the place or shoot your first. Sometimes attacking is the right answer to self-defense and sometimes not attacking is the right decision. For me I won't limit myself because I don't know which choice I'll need to keep myself safe. The only thing that I know for certain is that I want to have both options available and to make the right choice when the time comes.
 

skribs

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Not for me. For me, the art of self-defense is to protect one's self either through offensive or defensive means.

I don't wait for the attack to come. I'm more than happy to make offensive move. Some times my offensive move is physical and other times it's non-physical. It can be as simple as taking the offensive by walking to a different area. to avoid danger or as complex and nerve wrecking as standing my ground and not backing down.

If a man was trying to kidnap or beat up a 10 year old girl. People will take the offensive even though they aren't being threaten directly. Some may say by not being offensive, one may be putting your self in future harms way, by standing there watching the girl get beaten or taken. You may serve time for not trying to help. A vigilante may decide to deal with you themselves.

If a person walked into a room with a gun you have 2 options. You can either go on the offensive or wait see if the guy will shoot up the place or shoot your first. Sometimes attacking is the right answer to self-defense and sometimes not attacking is the right decision. For me I won't limit myself because I don't know which choice I'll need to keep myself safe. The only thing that I know for certain is that I want to have both options available and to make the right choice when the time comes.
And if someone takes you down, a boxer is out of their element. No art is always the answer for every situation. It's easy to cherry-pick a situation and say "this art is bad because it doesn't work here."
 

Kung Fu Wang

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I don't wait for the attack to come. I'm more than happy to make offensive move.
I also don't like to assume that I'm the good guy, everybody else are all bad guys and try to get me. I like to assume that I can be a bad guy if I want to. I just don't think the world is suitable for any good guy to live in.
 
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JowGaWolf

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I also don't like to assume that I'm the good guy, everybody else are all bad guys and try to get me. I like to assume that I can be a bad guy if I want to. I just don't think the world is suitable for any good guy to live in.
to be honest I don't make it a Good Guy or Bad Guy thing. I try not to add my emotions or moral values to a self-defense situation. If I'm in a situation where I have to use self-defense then I need to focus on the task before me. I don't need to be irrational by letting my anger getting the best of me. I don't need to have an inner debate about what is morally right or wrong once the fists start flying. All of that needs to be sorted out before the physical battle. Once I'm in the fight, then that's what I need to focus on. I either need to win it or get out of it in a way that benefits me the most. I can have my moral debate after the battle. I need a clear mind so I can accurately read the situation I'm in. If make my decisions all about "Good guy" vs "Bad guy" then I can end getting myself killed.

Lots of people have tried to be the good guy and got themselves killed in the process. Sometimes they over look better decision simply because they are trying to be the "Good guy." Sometimes being a "Good Guy or Good Gal may be to record video and do it in a way that it' easy for police to identify the attacker and or the car that they may try to escape on. As a teen and young adult, I always tried to be "The Good Guy" it got me no where. The people I tried to help accused me of being the bad guy and turned on me. People don't these days don't trust "Good guys" because they can't believe that someone can actually be good. They always think that there has to be some dark hidden plan. While the "Bad guy" is accepted and sometimes supported. People will say things like "At least the Bad guy is honest and does his bad deeds in the open and doesn't try to hide it like the good guy."

Like I told my cousin 20 years ago. I put up my hero cape for good.
 

isshinryuronin

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Set up the grab vs trying to react to random grabs.
This is fact in the art of grabbing (qin na-Chinese/tuite-Okinawan). While there may be times when an opponent gives you a "freebie" opportunity to grab/counter grab and utilize it effectively, those times are rare and I wouldn't count on such "gifts." Your grab/counter grab needs to be set up 90% of the time, not only to set it, but to then use it for a twist, lock, break, controlling his motion, take down, etc.

The two main ways to set up a grab, for me, are:
1. To land a good strike first. This can be to the target arm, or anywhere that can hurt, thus breaking his mental balance.
2. To break his physical balance which in turn breaks his mental balance.

This loss of balance means that for a half second, the opponent is frozen, unable to respond to your grab before you have it well set and continue with your technique. Without this breaking of balance, chances are the opponent will slip or break out of your grab, or worse yet, counter/reverse it.

I believe even aikido once commonly used strikes in this manner, though perhaps I am misremembering. It is a necessary thing for using grabbing techniques in actual combat, but not so much when practicing aikido as a pure art.

By the way, I think aikido in any form is cool. I love the way it teaches to combine and flow with the opponent and stay relaxed while doing it. That has to be good for something. :)
 

drop bear

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The whole point of the art is self-defense. It's a one-sided affair; your opponent is the aggressor, and you are the defender. It's not about squaring off and seeing who can win. There is no point in being offensive.

To be well rounded at self defence you should be able to engage a threat. Even if you were trying to be non violent.

Otherwise don't trade at all. Just run off. And cut the middle man.
 

Gerry Seymour

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I don't like the way that he grabs on his opponent's wrist with his tiger mouth facing toward his opponent (at 1.29).

In MA, you have to think at least 1 step ahead. When you grab on your opponent's wrist like that, your opponent will rotate his arm against your thumb. This will put his arm inside and on top of your arm. That will be to your dis-advantage.
Not always. There is no always. Every method of counter-gripping has something the opponent could do to.

This is one way to control from that grip. It's not the only way, but - in the right circumstances - that counter-grip works.
 

Gerry Seymour

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It's very risky to assume your opponent doesn't know anything. I like to assume my opponent is always about my level (be able to plan at least 1 step ahead).
If they've grabbed your wrist like that, it's unlikely they're a skilled fighter. That's just not an effective start to an attack (as it is presented in the drill). If you change what goes along with that wrist grab, you change the response, as well.
 

Gerry Seymour

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This is fact in the art of grabbing (qin na-Chinese/tuite-Okinawan). While there may be times when an opponent gives you a "freebie" opportunity to grab/counter grab and utilize it effectively, those times are rare and I wouldn't count on such "gifts." Your grab/counter grab needs to be set up 90% of the time, not only to set it, but to then use it for a twist, lock, break, controlling his motion, take down, etc.

The two main ways to set up a grab, for me, are:
1. To land a good strike first. This can be to the target arm, or anywhere that can hurt, thus breaking his mental balance.
2. To break his physical balance which in turn breaks his mental balance.

This loss of balance means that for a half second, the opponent is frozen, unable to respond to your grab before you have it well set and continue with your technique. Without this breaking of balance, chances are the opponent will slip or break out of your grab, or worse yet, counter/reverse it.

I believe even aikido once commonly used strikes in this manner, though perhaps I am misremembering. It is a necessary thing for using grabbing techniques in actual combat, but not so much when practicing aikido as a pure art.

By the way, I think aikido in any form is cool. I love the way it teaches to combine and flow with the opponent and stay relaxed while doing it. That has to be good for something. :)
I've never seen footage of pure Aikido (meaning not some blend) using strikes more than in passing, but Ueshiba did make comments about the importance of atemi in Aikido.
 

Oily Dragon

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If they've grabbed your wrist like that, it's unlikely they're a skilled fighter. That's just not an effective start to an attack (as it is presented in the drill). If you change what goes along with that wrist grab, you change the response, as well.
A jujutsu teacher once told me, never give them a wrist, let them give it to you.

From there to flying triangle.

Come to think of it, same teacher also said "fall ugly, land ugly". Never want to forget that one. That's Aikido's thing, too.
 
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Holmejr

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I like that the sparring was honest and that the Aikidoka was given opportunities to try to work the technique within realistic parameters. I hope he shows another sparring session after he has a chance to review and recalculate. You can tell he was getting gassed lol. He better work on that cardio a little more. Good thing is that he as an opportunity to be better because he sparred.
I wouldnt call that honest. Honest would be the Aikidoka creating opportunities in a non compliant situation. In Eskrido de Alcuizar because it is weapon centric we emphasize control. But there is usually no control,lock,disarm or submission unless the opponent is brought to that place. Usually by a solid working over
 
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