32 Classes from Yellow to Orange

Thesemindz

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Ok, so in another thread, http://www.martialtalk.com/forum/showthread.php?97849-32-Classes-From-White-to-Yellow, I posted a 32 class curriculum for taking a student from their very first class to their Yellow Belt test based on the kenpo curriculum that I teach. Here's how I described that curriculum.

This isn't complete, it doesn't contain any stretching or calisthenics. It's just a list of curriculum, drills, and activities. But in an ideal teaching environment, I think this would result in a pretty strong yellow belt. I tried to cover a number of simple techniques and practices with a lot of variation and a clear progression through the most beginner material. This includes striking with the hands and feet, simple stand up grappling, and basic defenses against weapons. It deals with ground fighting but only in a very basic sense against a standing opponent. I won't teach actual two prone ground fighting until later in the curriculum.

This level of curriculum is about teaching the students how to move and control and feel their bodies. I've started on the next level of curriculum which is going to be focused on learning how to train with a partner.

Now I've written a similar 32 class curriculum for taking a student from Yellow Belt to Orange Belt. While the first level of the curriculum was designed to teach the student how to use their own bodies, the second level of the curriculum is designed to teach the student how to train safely and interact with a training partner. In this level they'll explore how to interact with a partner for safe training, how to sense their opponent's position and movements, and how to make controlled contact to the body. There's also some very basic ground fighting taught in a static fashion to introduce them to the basics of being on the ground.

I'm going to warn you now. This is long. It's just a rough outline but 32 classes adds up. I think it's easy enough to follow, but if anybody has any questions feel free to ask. And if you see anything you like, feel free to use it.

You probably won't recognize the technique names. Some you can probably guess. Others you won't know. If you need specifics ask. It should be generally clear from context.

So, here's 32 classes to teach the students my Orange Belt curriculum. This is formulated with the idea that I would have a group of orange belts all training at the same pace and never missing class. Of course, that's a completely unrealistic scenario so I'd have to make changes almost immediately. But in an ideal world, here's what the curriculum would look like. Bear in mind, this is still a work in progress and is more like a flexible idea than a rigid teaching schedule. If you see any drills or activities you like you are of course welcome to them.



Orange Belt Curriculum




Techniques
  1. Deceptive Gift – right dishonorable handshake to right hand from 12
  2. Begging Palms – double wrist grab from 12
  3. Hidden Elbows – right close grab to top of left shoulder from 4:30
  4. Twins of Fury – high two handed push to upper torso from 12
  5. Fallen Fury – two handed push to the ground from 12
  6. Attacking Fist – right straight punch to the head from 12
  7. Raining Claw – right inverted horizontal punch to lower ribs from 12
  8. Deflecting Hammer – right step through front thrust kick to the groin from 12
  9. Crossing Block – upward knee strikes to the head from within the clinch position from 12
  10. Charging Ram – mid line tackle to the waist from 12
  11. Escaping the Mount – in bottom position facing opponent mounted over upper torso
  12. Passing the Guard – in top position facing opponent in closed guard around lower abdomen
  13. Escaping the Hammer – right hammerlock to right arm from 6
  14. Checking the Storm – right step through overhead downward heavy club attack to head from 12

Patterns
  • Elbow Set
  • Kicking Set 1
  • Short Form 1

Knowledge Factors
  • White Dot Focus/Black Zone Awareness:Black Dot Focus/White Zone Awareness
  • Complimentary Angle
  • Pulsing Method
  • Rate Yourself 1-10 (where you were, are, want to be, could be)
  • 3 Ways to Add Power (Back Up Mass, Opposing Force, Marriage of Gravity)
  • Obscure Zones
  • Checking on the Inside and Outside of the Arm
  • Heavy Clubs and Light Sticks

Classes


Class 1
Curriculum
Deceptive Gift (dishonorable handshakes, striking with the off hand, stress and shock, penetrating through the opponent's stance with checks)
White Dot Focus/Black Zone Awareness:Black Dot Focus/White Zone Awareness (|knowledge factor|)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Practicing Dishonorable Handshakes – Body (crush/sucker punch/pulling into holds)
Holding and Hitting – Body (engage using grabs/handshake/holds, striking with the off hand, switching hands and grapples)
Extending the Opponent's Limbs – Partner (opponent keeps arms loosely anchored in to the body, grab at the hand/wrist/forearm and attempt to extend the arm away from the opponent's body, dynamic increasing intensity)
Holding and Checking – Partner (engage using grabs/handshake/holds, opponent strikes with both hands, use position/pinning checks to defend/control opponent's strikes, continuous)
Penetrating through the Opponent's Position with Strikes – Line Drill (advancing with knees and elbows against a partner holding a shield, use strikes to push opponent back, alternating)
Break


Class 2
Training with a Partner
Sensing the Opponent's Position – Partner (eyes closed, making contact with the enemy using open hands and grabs, opponent changes levels and positions, maintain contact and sense movements)
Watching for Tells – Pads (single hand and foot strikes, pad holder watches for tells and alerts striker, striker makes corrections)
Hand and Foot Combinations – Shields (circling/pressing/escaping, striking with hands and feet)
Mirroring Movements and Striking – Partner (circle walking and executing hand and foot techniques out of contact range, h/p, watching and mirroring the partner's motions)
Break
Working with a Partner
Pummeling Drill with Eyes Closed – Partner (maintaining inside/outside position, circling, taking the back)
Flash Drill – Pads (circling partner flashes pads hi/mid/low, student strikes with single hand and foot techniques)
Hand and Foot Combinations – Line Drill (advancing/retreating with strikes, partner defending, down the floor then alternating)
Long Range Defenses – Partner (sparring style, slow speed touch contact, h/p, circling with long range hand and foot techniques to body, {evasion/checking/jamming/blocking})
Break


Class 3
Basics Practice
Hand Basics – Shield (open and closed hand strikes, elbows, advancing with strikes)
Foot Basics – Shield (kicks and knees, retreating with strikes)
All Weapons Basics – Shield (hand and foot combinations, circling with strikes)
Curriculum
Begging Palms (rocking horse effect, rotating hips, straight pulling wrist escapes, double forward palm strikes)
Elbow Set – Air (inward/outward/rearward/upward/downward/obscure)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Rocking Horse Effect – Body (static drill, explore using strikes and manipulations to cause “rocking horse effect”)
Striking with Rotational Energy – Bag (static, using the neutral to forward bow stance transition to generate power for single and double hand strikes)
Double Wrist Grab Escapes – Partner (pulling double straight wrist grab escape, inside out double cross wrist grab escape, alternating)
Break


Class 4
Stance Practice
Stance Formation – In Place (practice proper height/width/depth for neutral bow/forward bow/close kneel/cat stances)
Stance Transitions – In Place (practice transitioning between neutral bow and cat/neutral bow and forward bow/forward bow and close kneel)
Stance Walking – Line Drill (practicing advancing and retreating with push drag/step drag/drag step/step through foot maneuvers in a neutral bow, maintaining proper height/width/depth after each foot maneuver)
Curriculum
Hidden Elbows (compound striking, body slams, groin grabs, obscure elbows, “rubber band” effect [muscle tension])
Break
Dynamic Drills
Body Slams – Shields (advancing and retreating, simultaneous striking with the shoulder/arm/hip/leg/foot)
Finding the Groin – Partner (opponent attacks from behind with grab/hold, {find the groin with strikes/grabs}, static/dynamic)
Elbow Strikes – Pads (inward/outward/rearward/upward/downward/obscure)
Compound Striking – Shields (static, vertical elbow/hammerfist combination, horizontal punch/elbow combination)
Break


Class 5
Foot Maneuver Training
Step Drag – Line Drill (advancing/retreating)
Drag Step – Line Drill (advancing/retreating)
Push Drag – Line Drill (advancing/retreating)
Step Through – Line Drill (advancing/retreating)
Curriculum
Twins of Fury (stop kicking, combining upper body defense with lower body offense, knees and groin as major targets, stepping back and kicking forward)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Retreating with Kicks – Line Drill (retreating with foot maneuvers and front kicks/side kicks to 12)
Blocking and Kicking – Partner (circling, slow speed touch contact, opponent attacks with punch/push, {block/low line kick counter}, continuous)
Striking the Knees and Groin – Body (static, circle the opponent using hand and foot techniques to strike the knees and groin from all directions)
Practicing Stop Kicks – Line Drill (opponent advances with foot maneuvers no striking, {retreat with foot maneuver/low line kick counter}, down the floor then alternate)
Break


Class 6
Curriculum
Kicking Set 1 – Air (front/wheel/side/rear, kicking combinations)
Basics Practice
Elbow Strikes – Pads (inward/outward/rearward/upward/downward/obscure)
Kicks – Bag (front/wheel/side/rear, kicking combinations)
Jabs/Crosses – Pads (partner circling with pads high, jabs/crosses returning to neutral guard position between striking)
Knee Strikes – Body (static, moving the opponent with forward thrusting/upward lifting knee strikes)
Break
Line Drills
Advancing with Elbow Strikes – Shield (advancing through the opponent, striking/pressing the shield with elbows)
Retreating with Kicks – Shield (kicking and landing back retreating)
Advancing with Jabs/Crosses – Pads (advancing with foot maneuvers and jabs/crosses to high pads)
Stepping Through with Knee Strikes – Body (controlling the opponent in clinch position, driving opponent down floor with control and striking)
Break


Class 7
Breakfall Practice
Practicing Proper Form – In Place (sitting/squatting/crouching/standing, 5 repetitions each)
Falling out of a Push – Partner (opponent pushes student to the ground, {back breakfall}, rise and alternate)
Curriculum
Fallen Fury (breakfall, kicking from the ground [each hip/back/hands and knees], mule kick, step through to stand up)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Kicking from the Ground – Shields (static, kicks from each hip/back/hands and knees)
Practicing Stand Ups – In Place (static, hands and knees rising, hand spin stand up, street fighter stand up, step through stand up)
Defending from the Ground – Partner (opponent circles and aggresses. {keep legs between opponent and head, controlled kicks and presses, escape to stand up)
Break


Class 8
Pattern Practice
Elbow Set – Air (form/accuracy/speed/power)
Kicking Set 1 – Air (form/accuracy/speed/power)
Elbow Set – Pads (each strike 5 times increasing intensity)
Kicking Set 1 – Pads (each kick 5 times increasing intensity)
Break
Technique Practice
Yellow Techniques – Air (running list, each technique twice)
Yellow Techniques – Body (running list, alternating, each techniques twice)
Orange Techniques – Air (first four, each technique twice)
Orange Techniques – Body (first four, each technique twice)
Break


Class 9
Pad Drills
Blocks from a Fighting Stance – Pads (dynamic, opponent strikes with pads, {defend with hard blocking technique})
Boxing Maneuvering – Pads (partner holds pads/attacks with pads, {hook/cross/jab/uppercut/bob and weave/cover})
Kickboxing Strikes – Pads (dynamic, partner holding pads hi/mid horizontal/mid facing down, jab/cross/knee/wheel kick/roundhouse kick against the pads})
Advancing with Strikes – Pads (line drill, partner holds pads hi and retreats, {advance with hand strikes to the pads})
Break
Body Work
Body Conditioning – Partner (static, horse stance/fighting stance, partner circles with controlled strikes to torso, practice sensing/shifting/tensing/breathing to absorb impact)
Manipulating the Opponent In Place – Partner (static, practice engaging with grabs/holds and repositioning the opponent's body)
Manipulating the Opponent Around – Partner (static, practice engaging with grabs/holds and repositioning the opponent around the room)
Swarming and Circling – Partner (static, practice engaging with grabs/holds and moving around and behind the opponent)
Break


Class 10
Basics Practice
Practicing the Reverse Punch – Bag (pivoting and setting in the stance, weapon formulation at different heights)
Practicing the Front Thrust Kick – Bag (thrusting the hip and developing stability in the base leg, proper foot and ankle alignment)
Curriculum
Attacking Fist(reverse punch, defenses to the outside, contouring, holding and kicking)
Complimentary Angles (|knowledge factor|, 90 degrees for energy transferance, angle at which weapon best fits target)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Moving to the Outside Position – Partner (dynamic, open faced, circling opponent throws jab, {lead hand block and move to outside position/cross counter})
Contouring the Arms and Torso – Body (static, maintaining contact move from head to arms to torso and back, eyes open/eyes closed)
Holding and Kicking – Body (static, grab/hold opponent and strike with controlled stomps/knees/kicks)
Flowing from Strikes to Grapples – Body (static, punch/grab, punch/arm bar, punch/bearhug)
Break


Class 11
Curriculum
Short Form 1 (retreat and defend, double factor blocking)
Pulsing Method (|method of execution|, torquing/tensing at the point of contact)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Circle of Double Factors – Air (horse stance, upward/outward/downward double factor blocks clockwise/counter clockwise)
Retreating from Punch Attacks – Line Drill (partner advancing with straight punches, {retreat with step through foot maneuvers and inward/outward/upward blocks})
Retreating from Kick Attacks – Line Drill (partner advancing with front thrust kicks, {retreat with step through foot maneuvers and downward blocks})
Blocks as Strikes on the Pads – Line Drill (partner advancing with straight punches holding pads, {retreat with hard blocks against the pads, strike and pulse})
Break


Class 12
Shield Drills
Hand Techniques – Shields (circling/pressing/retreating with close/long range strikes, striking with the forearm)
Foot Techniques – Shields (circling/pressing/retreating with close long range kicks, high/low kicking combinations without setting down the foot)
Body Slams – Shields (advancing and retreating, simultaneous striking with the shoulder/arm/hip/leg/foot, striking and pressing the opponent with the body)
Full Body Techniques – Line Drill (advancing with hand/foot/body techniques pressing/striking the partner holding a shield the length of the floor, alternating)
Break
Contact Drills
Defining Touch Contact – Body (static, circle with controlled touch contact strikes to limbs and torso)
Defining Light Contact – Partner (dynamic, covering and absorbing light contact strikes from a partner to the torso)
Defining Medium Contact – Shields (static, circling with medium contact strikes that move the opponent, breathing and tensing when striking and getting struck)
Defining Heavy Contact – Bag (palm strikes and rear kicks, proper form, hitting and penetrating through the target with heavy contact strikes)
Break


Class 13
Curriculum
Short Form 1 (straight cross footwork pattern, coversteps and reverse pivots)
3 Ways to Add Power (|knowledge factor|, Back Up Mass, Opposing Force, Marriage of Gravity)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Facing Four Directions – In Place (neutral bow guard up, step through advancing/retreating, coversteps, pivot steps, facing 12,9,6,3)
Striking Four Directions – In Place (neutral bow guard up, facing four directions, striking with hands and feet)
Meeting on the Cross Footwork Pattern – Partner (static, facing a partner outside contact range in a fighting stance, step together directly towards each other to contact range/step away along a 90 degree angle to face each other on a new line/repeat, one step at a time)
Striking and Defending on the Cross – Partner (h/p, face/step together with strike/block/retreat along 90 degree angle to new line/repeat)
Escaping with Reverse Pivot Steps – Partner (h/p, dynamic, partner approaches in a fighting stance, {fighting stance, angle change/retreat with a reverse pivot step}, give chase and repeat)
Break


Class 14
Pattern Review
Short Form 1 (right and left side, kime, breathing)
Curriculum
Raining Claw (body blows, momentum checking, creating obscure zones, push drags with strikes)
Obscure Zones (|knowledge factor|, any zone which can be sensed but not seen)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Striking to the Body – Partner (fighting stance, partner covering and absorbing strikes, circle with light contact punches to the body)
Hard Blocking to Affect the Posture – Partner (h/p, static, slow speed, partner strikes high/mid/low with hands, {hard blocking defense that penetrates through the opponent's limb causing a significant change in his posture}, repeat from that position, one step continuous)
Creating the Obscure Zone – Partner (h/p, fighting stance, dynamic, slow speed, chase the opponent reaching out to cover their eyes with your hands, opponent does not defend but moves and changes positions, [practice carefully around the eyes])
Body Momentum and Back Up Mass – Shields (striking with foot maneuvers, step drag/drag step/push drag/step through foot maneuvers with hand strikes for power)
Break


Class 15
Stand Up Grappling
Basic Grabs – Partner (dynamic, manipulating with one and two hand grabs)
Basic Pushes – Partner (dynamic, manipulating with straight and cross pushes and body slams)
Basic Holds – Partner (dynamic, manipulating with bearhugs and arm hold)
Basic Head Control – Partner (dynamic, manipulating with clinch position, side headlock)
Break
Grapple Flow Drills
Competitive Grabbing – Partner (dynamic, grabbing and controlling, pressing/pulling, escaping, manipulating with grabs)
Push Hands – Partner (dynamic, in place fighting stance, using pushes to off balance the opponent)
Swarming and Circling – Partner (dynamic, practice engaging with grabs/holds and moving around and behind the opponent)
Controlling with the Head – Partner (h/p, dynamic, flowing with head control positions and manipulating the opponent, opponent attempts to maintain and control base but does not defend or escape head control techniques)
Break


Class 16
Curriculum
Deflecting Hammer (striking the bladder, deflecting blocks, hands high/low/high, engaging with checks, bringing the target to the weapon, checking the counter)
Rate Yourself 1-10 (|knowledge factor|, where you were, are, want to be, could be)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Practicing Deflecting Downward Blocks – Partner (opponent attacks with front kicks to groin/bladder/body, {step back/deflecting downward block}, reset/repeat other side, continuous)
Engaging with Checks – Partner (dynamic, partner moving in neutral bow guard up, chase with checks to the opponent's limbs, maintain contact and press)
Checking the Checks – Partner (beginning with simplest techniques attacker engages each of defender's checks with action [re-maneuvering or striking])
Exploring the Counters – Partner (beginning with simplest techniques explore each step of the self defense techniques for possible counters, practice engaging with counters at slow speed)
Break


Class 17
Pattern Review
Short Form 1 (defensive maneuvers, hard blocking techniques)
Curriculum
Crossing Block (clinch position, downward cross block, anchoring to the clinch position, sloughing escape)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Knee Strikes for Power – Pads (partner holds pads down at mid line,strike with lifting/bracing knee strikes and breathing)
Controlling with the Clinch Position – Body (manipulate with clinch position, {anchor and base})
Knee Strikes from Clinch Position – Body (controlling in the clinch position striking with knees to the head and body, {defend with cross block}
Escaping the Clinch Position – Partner (h/p, control with clinch position, {use sloughing/wedging to escape hold}, engage with clinch and alternate)
Break


Class 18
Basics Practice
Strikes from a Horse Stance – Air (in place, punches/handswords/palm strikes, front/side/rear kicks)
Strikes from a Fighting Stance – Pads (circling, high/low pads, hand strikes high/foot strikes low)
Strikes from the Ground – Shields (shield holder circling, hand/foot strikes to the shields circling/rolling/scrambling on the ground)
Strikes in Sequence – Body (static, circling and striking the opponent in long combinations of successive hand and foot strikes changing ranges/positions/levels, focusing on targeting/angle of contact/weapon structure)
Break
Category of Attack Defenses
Grabs – Partner (opponent grabs from any direction, {defend with grab escapes/defenses})
Pushes – Partner (opponent pushes high/low from 12, {base/block/counter with hands/feet})
Punches – Partner (opponent punches with straights/hooks from 12, {control inside position/counter to centerline})
Kicks – Partner (opponent attacks with front/side/rear kicks from 12, {retreat out of range, deflect/block/strike the kicking leg, counter to the body})
Break


Class 19
Pattern Review
Short Form 1 (pivoting and defending)
Curriculum
Charging Ram (mid line shoulder tackle, pivoting off line, strike downs, kicking a downed opponent)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Mid Line Shoulder Tackle – Body (practice controlled tackle to hold/takedown/lift)
Pivoting Off the Line of Attack – Partner (slow speed, partner advances linearly with straight strikes, {pivot off line and counter strike as opponent passes}, reface and repeat)
Practicing Strike Downs – Body (static practice of strike down/press down to bowed opponent from above)
Kicking a Downed Opponent – Partner (h/p, dynamic, circling and controlled kicking to a prone opponent, {circle/cover/jam with legs to defend against kicks})
Break


Class 20
Energy Drills
Breath Control – In Place (inhaling/holding/exhaling/holding, breathing with strikes, tensing with inward hammerfists to own abdomen)
Sensing the Opponent's Position – Body (eyes closed, sensing changes in stance and position through grabs and holds)
Push Hands – Partner (fighting stance, both hands extended touching partner palm to palm, yielding and pressing, circling)
Slow Bearhug Manipulations – Partner (lift/press/drag/turn, walking and circling in the bearhug)
Striking 3 Levels of Contact – Body (dumb partner, static, touch/light/medium contact strikes to the limbs and upper torso, controlled drill)
Break
Partner Drills
Striking and Covering with the Hands – Pads (partner holding pads high/executing wide strikes high with the pad, striking with palms and punches/covering and evading strikes, circling)
Kicks and Knees – Pads (partner holding pads low/stacked in front of them, kicking/knee strikes, circling)
One Strike Defense – Partner (attack with a punch, {step back and defend/counter}, step back and defend/counter, alternating slow speed)
Alternating Grapples – Partner (attack with grab/push/hold/headlock, {escape and counter with grapple}, escape and counter with grapple, alternating slow speed)
Break


Class 21
Curriculum
Escaping the Mount (top/bottom positions, mount position, bucking, rolling mount escape)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Learning the Mount – Partner (basic position, purpose, examples of striking/grabbing the bottom opponent)
In the Top Position of the Mount – Partner (balance and settling, moving up and down opponent's torso, pinning the hands over the head)
In the Bottom Position of the Mount – Partner (releasing the arms with clearing motions, grabbing the belt, bucking, moving forward and back under the opponent, lateral rolling)
Practicing the Rolling Mount Escape – Partner (mount, {escape}, reset and repeat)
Break


Class 22
Grappling or Striking
Attacking with Grabs and Pushes – Partner (simulating escalation phase with vocal stimulus, attacker enters with grab/push, {base/escape/guard/command}, reset and repeat)
Attacking with Punches – Partner (simulating escalation phase with vocal stimulus, attacker enters with slow speed punch, {escape/defend/guard/command}, reset and repeat)
Defending against Holds – Partner (eyes closed, opponent attacks with arm hold/bearhug/headlock, {base/grab the grab/separate/guard/command}, reset and repeat)
Attacking with Kicks – Partner (simulating escalation phase with vocal stimulus, attacker enters with slow speed kick, {escape/defend/guard/command}, reset and repeat)
Break
Grappling and Striking
Attacking with Punches off of Grab Entries – Partner (simulating transition from escalation to combat phase with vocal stimulus, attack enters with grab/follow up off hand striking to the body, {cover/base/escape/off angle/enter with bearhug arms pinned}, reset and repeat)
Pressing Pushes and Striking Pushes – Shields (static, practicing moving the opponent away striking with pushes/pressing with pushes, increasing intensity)
Attacking with Kicks from Holds – Partner (begin in arm hold/bearhug/headlock, attack with kicks/stomps/knee strikes while maintaining grapple position, static)
Striking From the Top Position – Partner (mount position, top position slow controlled strikes to head and body, bottom position cover and block)
Break


Class 23
Curriculum
Passing the Guard (guard position, elbow wedge guard pass, swimming, side mount position)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Learning the Guard – Partner (basic position, guard position, examples of defending from the bottom position)
In the Top Position of the Guard – Partner (crushing into opponent's lower abdomen, plank position pressing down and moving side to side, lateral movement on the knees, grabbing the belt)
In the Bottom Position of the Guard – Partner (lateral movement on the back, swinging the hips out to move from side to side, pressing away with the hips and knees, pulling the opponent into a bearhug, alternating pulling in and pushing away)
Practicing the Elbow Wedge Guard Pass – Partner (guard, {escape}, reset and repeat)
Break


Class 24
Counter Drills
High Strike Counter – Partner (opponent attacks with punch or kick, {escape/defend/counter with high hand technique}, reset, alternating)
Low Strike Counter – Partner (opponent attacks with punch or kick, {escape/defend/counter with low foot technique}, reset, alternating)
Jamming Counter – Partner (opponent attacks with punch or kick, {escape/defend/counter with pressing position checks to opponent's limbs/shoulders/hips, press opponent away and maintain contact}, reset, alternating)
Grapple Counter – Partner (opponent attacks with punch or kick, {escape/defend/counter with grab or hold/control opponent with grapple}, reset, alternating)
Break
Spontaneous Self Defense
Defending Against Grabs and Pushes – Partner (committed attacks, counter with striking)
Defending Against Punches and Kicks – Partner (defender eyes closed, strike with kiai/{open eyes on kiai}, slow speed, counter with grapples)
Defending Against Holds – Partner (dynamic holds, strike free and create space, controlled contact)
Defending Against Spontaneous Attacks – Partner (circling, take turns attacking, defend and counter, alternate)
Break


Class 25
Curriculum
Escaping the Hammer (hammerlock, arm whip, negative body posture, pulling by the extended arm)
Checking on the Inside and Outside of the Arm (|knowledge factor|, placement and counters)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Learning the Hammerlock – Body (basic straight hammerlock, applying the lock, submitting with shoulder pressure, off hand checking)
Walking with the Hammerlock – Partner (applying the straight hammerlock with off hand pressing check, walk opponent down the floor, increasing intensity)
Whipping and Dragging by the Extended Arm – Body (practice rolling/whipping/pulling the extended arm to change the opponent's position)
Alternating Hammerlock Techniques – Partner (attack with hammerlock, {step out of lock/turn/counter with hammerlock}, alternate)
Break


Class 26
Curriculum
Checking the Storm (overhead club attacks, club evasion, shielding, chicken front kicks)
Heavy Clubs and Light Sticks (|knowledge factor|, differences/strengths/weaknesses/methods of execution)
Break
Dynamic Drills
Overhead Attacks with the Club – Pads (striking down with energized arm/whipping arm)
Club Evasion – Partner (h/p, slow speed, chasing with vertical/horizontal club attacks, escaping with footwork, no contact)
Chicken Front Kicks – Shields (form, accuracy, speed, power)
Spontaneous Club Defense – Partner (attack with vertical/horizontal club attacks, {step back/counter with strikes/impact disarm}, reset and repeat)
Break


Class 27
Striking Combinations
Hand/Hand – Air (palm/punch, bks/punch, punch/handsword)
Hand/Foot – Pads (circling partner holds one pad high/one pad low, jab/fk, bks/sk)
Foot/Foot – Shields (circling, one foot – fk/wk, sk/rk, wk/wk, two feet – fk/fk, fk/rhk, sk/rk)
Foot/Hand – Body (h/p, static, circling, attack with foot/hand combinations to a dumb opponent, light contact)
Break
Striking Counters
Two Strike Defense – Partner (attack with a punch, {step back and defend/counter hand/counter foot}, step back and defend/counter hand/counter foot, alternating slow speed)
Striking from Cover Position – Partner (h/p, medium speed, partner attacks with light contact hands, {cover and evade/watch for opening/explode to centerline with strikes}/cover and evade, alternating)
Sticky Hands with Kicks – Partner (controlling inside/outside position, circling and changing levels, attacking with controlled low line kicks)
Striking Out of Grapples – Partner (engage with any control maneuver, {isolate grapple and strike away/engage with any control maneuver}, alternating)
Break


Class 28
Pattern Review
Elbow Set – Air (3 repetitions, increasing intensity)
Kicking Set 1 – Air (3 repetitions, increasing intensity)
Short Form 1 – Air (3 repetitions, increasing intensity)
Break
Technique Review
Yellow Techniques – Air (twice each with intensity and focus)
Yellow Techniques – Body (twice each with contact and timing)
Orange Techniques – Air (twice each with intensity and focus)
Orange Techniques – Body (twice each with contact and timing)
Break


Class 29
Striking from the Ground
Punching and Kicking While Prone – Air (laying on the back practicing punches/palms/handswords/backnuckles and heel/side/front/wheel kicks in place)
Circling with Strikes While Prone – Shields (static drill, rotating 360 degrees on back with kicks and punches to a circling partner, both directions)
Jamming and Checking with the Legs – Body (slow speed, rotating on back, partner stepping in, extend and contact between the knee and ankle, partner steps back/circles/advances)
Dying Cockroach – Group Activity (control intensity, slow speed, one student on back, group circling with shields, prone student kicks and strikes to shields, group moves in and out)
Break
Stand Up Grappling
Grabbing and Pushing – Partner (simulating escalation to engagement with vocal stimulus, practice grabbing and pushing/pulling with the grab, {grab the grab/base}, alternate)
Moving by the Head – Body (clinch position/side headlock, controlled manipulations, moving the body forward/back/around, flowing between the two positions, {clear the airway/base}, continuous)
Tackle Techniques – Partner (controlled dynamic drill, student practices controlled tackle to hold/takedown/lift while defender checks and pushes the tackler away while stepping off line)
Wrestling to the Hammerlock – Partner (controlled dynamic drill, crossed wrist grab, students practice flowing back and forth to the hammerlock position, increasing intensity with gradually increasing resistance, [practice caution around the joints, technique/form/angle/leverage])
Break


Class 30
Striking and Grappling in Combination
Holding and Hitting – Partner (h/p, static drill, grab and strike with the off hand, {cover})
Sticky Hands with Off Hand Striking – Partner (h/p, slow to med, touch contact strikes to the body)
Knees and Elbows in the Clinch – Partner (h/p, slow to med, touch contact, strikes to the body/head, {cover/base}, continuous)
Striking from Inside a Bearhug – Partner (partner holds and maintains a bearhug practicing evasive movement and defensive head position, {practice controlled hammerfists/stomps}, continuous)
Break
Back and Forth Drills
Advancing and Retreating with Linear Strikes – Line Drill (with a partner, short lines, hard blocks and evasion)
Covering to Counter – Partner (controlled strikes to the head and body, {cover/wait for opportunity/explode to centerline with linear strikes}, cover and alternate)
Close/Far to Arm Grapples – Partner (flowing with increasing resistance, students engage with sticky hands/pummeling and flow to grab/arm hold/shoulder lock/elbow trap/hammerlock, back and forth)
3 Hit Kenpo – Partner (static alternating, attack with a right step through punch, {defend/counter/counter/counter/pause}, defend/counter/counter/counter/pause, increasing intensity, both dumb uke)
Break


Class 31
Partner Training
Striking the Pads – Circling (partner holds pads hi/mid/low/stacked and attacks with pads, kick/punch/knee/cover/evade)
Striking the Shields – Line Drill (partner advances and retreats with shields, advance and retreat with light to medium contact linear strikes)
Striking the Body – In Place (horse stance/fighting stance, circle with touch/light/medium contact strikes to body/limbs, {tense/breath/deflect/absorb)
Striking with a Partner – Circling (h/p, slow speed, hand/foot combinations one at a time, {evasion/hard blocking}, reset and repeat)
Break
Defending from the Ground
Walking the Outline – Partner (circling a prone partner with strikes/stomps/kicks, static, face up/face down, prone partner slowly moves on ground circling/rising halfway/rolling, continue controlled striking)
Circling on the Ground – Partner (circling a prone opponent and advancing, {spinning face up to keep legs between head and opponent and jamming with the legs}, continuous)
Defending Against the Leg Grab – Partner (engaging with grabs to the ankle, {sloughing/striking/rolling away}, regrabbing, continuous, dynamic)
Dying Cockroach – Group Activity (control intensity, slow speed, one student on back, group circling, prone student kicks and strikes to legs and body and jams with legs, group moves in and out, prone student waits for opportunity and attempts to rise, continuous)
Break


Class 32
Basics Practice
Striking from the Ground – Shields (static, hands and feet from prone/each hip/hands and knees)
Advancing with Linear Kicks and Punches – Line Drill (long lines, advancing with foot maneuvers and straight punches and kicks, {retreating with hard blocks}, down the floor and alternate)
Mount Escape to Guard Pass – Body (start in bottom position of mount, practice rolling mount escape to top position in guard/elbow wedge guard pass to side mount/step over to mount, alternate)
Simple Club Evasion – Partner (dynamic, slow speed, h/p, club strikes and thrusts, no contact evasion checking and guarding to the club side, continuous)
Break
Curriculum Review
Striking Combinations (hand and foot combinations from a fighting stance)
Knowledge Factors (White Dot Focus/Black Zone Awareness:Black Dot Focus/White Zone Awareness, Complimentary Angle, Pulsing Method, Rate Yourself 1-10 (where you were, are, want to be, could be), 3 Ways to Add Power (Back Up Mass, Opposing Force, Marriage of Gravity), Obscure Zones, Checking on the Inside and Outside of the Arm, Heavy Clubs and Light Sticks)
Techniques in the Air (running lists)
Patterns in the Air (elbow, kicking 1, short 1)
Break


TEST



So that's it. 32 classes, designed to last four months. I think that following my Yellow Belt Curriculum this would result in a pretty competent Orange Belt. Let me know what you think.


-Rob
 

Cyriacus

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Now, Im not Expert on Kenpo. In fact, I dont Practition Karate.
But ive got to ask, rather than just reading and Ignoring;

Might it not make sense to have "Advancing with Linear Kicks and Punches" as one of the First Classes, to show them that Fundamental Action, rather than just showing it to them towards the very end? And because of all the Bag Work and Drills, and Body Striking and the like, it could perhaps benefit them to be doing Linear Advances properly, rather than in a less refined manner.

Now, like i say. I may be missing something here. And feel free to tell me if i am. Because i may well be.
But i just cant help but think that it would be better for them to be performing Advancing Linear Techniques properly during Drills, as oppose to Learning the Proper Methodology afterward, and using weird Stance Based Advances instead; Or some kind of Walk-Up.
 
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Thesemindz

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Thanks for reading. If you look at the top, you will see that this is the second level of curriculum. Following this progression, they've already been through four months of training, which has already covered proper striking methods, stances, and movements. By the time they reach this level of the curriculum they should have developed at least some passable striking technique (at least as good as your average Yellow Belt that is). The purpose of practicing drills like "Advancing with Linear Kicks and Punches" is two fold. First to disguise the basic practice. They're really just practicing kicks and punches and stances and movements, again. Second is to develop the more complex skill of moving and striking at the same time. The progression is designed to constantly reinforce already established material while adding to and evolving it over time.

Another reason you see this slightly later in the curriculum is because I'm teaching a comprehensive skill set that involves far more than just kicking and punching. The students are learning how to use and respond to grabs, pushes, punches, kicks, holds, takedowns, chokes and strangulations, and weapons. So the curriculum is designed to progress through those skills as they go. That's why it begins with grabbing and pushing drills and escalates to punching and kicking, instead of starting with punching and kicking.

As to the practice of "weird Stance Based Advances," that is an important part of what I teach. Punches and kicks are only as effective as the stances they are executed from and the movements that are used to bridge the gap to the opponent. So we practice those stances, both moving and in place, and then layer the striking over the top. You have to learn to stand before you learn to walk, and learn to walk before you learn to run. At least, that's how I teach karate. If you go back and look at the previous curriculum, you will see that the very first class is standing/moving in place/moving the limbs/moving the limbs and body. It's a progression to move them forward.

When I was coming up we used to walk lines in the karate school all the time. The purpose is to practice using the stances and foot maneuvers to make a consistently effective and stable mobile platform for engagement. I practice stance walking with my hands down, with my hands up, and striking. I'm a big believer in isolating and then reintegrating the various aspects of complex skills.

Thanks for your comments. I'm happy to answer any questions you have. And remember, this is just an idea. This really is somewhat representative of what I teach, I've taught every one of these drills in one form or another over the years, but I've never had a class broken up this specifically by rank, all white or all yellow. I've always taught classes with multiple ranks together, so you have to spin the plates a little and can't focus solely on perfect skill progression for one student at the perfect pace. But if I could, this is how I'd do it. More or less. And I'm always looking for ways to improve, so I appreciate the questions and the feedback. Thanks again.


-Rob
 

WC_lun

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My personal opinion is that you are approaching teachng in a too digital manner. Students are individuals. It is great to have a sylibus so there is some structure, but it is also very important to focus on the student's needs. Teaching what students need at a particular time to progress them will screw up the best of laid plans, but the students get more out of it...and so do the techers. Not eery student needs the same thing at the same point in thier study. Cookie cutter plans don't work well in my experience as a student and teacher of martial arts. We aren't teaching math :)

Good luck with your training and teaching!
 
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Thesemindz

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My personal opinion is that you are approaching teachng in a too digital manner. Students are individuals. It is great to have a sylibus so there is some structure, but it is also very important to focus on the student's needs. Teaching what students need at a particular time to progress them will screw up the best of laid plans, but the students get more out of it...and so do the techers. Not eery student needs the same thing at the same point in thier study. Cookie cutter plans don't work well in my experience as a student and teacher of martial arts. We aren't teaching math :)

Of course. And I agree completely. I've never had a class plan that survived first contact with the students. Attendance, relative skill level, and the speed at which students are absorbing and understanding the material all require adjustments to be made on the fly. As well, sometimes I may evolve to a more advanced drill if the students are catching on quickly, or simplify things to something smaller and easier if they are struggling. The purpose of having a class plan written out for every step of their training isn't to rigidly control their progress. It's to have a guide to work with as I move forward, and to set consistent expectations for each rank moving forward.

I'm not trying to set up a concrete structure with no room for deviation. I'm trying to plan ahead. I could just wing it, I have, but I believe that the students and I get more out of our training time together when I have done the thinking and planning before hand and when the classes and lessons and drills are structured in a progressive manner. I could just go in to class each time and pick something that I want to work on or that the kids are having a challenge with, and over time they'd get better at karate and we'd all keep training and growing. That's more or less the system I came up in, with some very limited structure provided by the existence of the kenpo techniques and patterns. But I believe that every karate school is better off with instructors that plan their classes. Full stop. We are all better off if we do the planning ahead of time. That doesn't mean everything will go according to plan. But it means we have a plan, and I believe that's better than the alternative no matter how talented the instructor or student.

It's like doing a fire drill or planning for a home invasion. You don't expect the real thing to be just like the drill, but having a plan is better than not. At least you know which direction to run when things go sideways. That's all this is. A roadmap. It doesn't mean it can't be adjusted. Of course, it will be adjusted. It must be adjusted. But having a class plan means having something to adjust. Not having a class plan means you're making it up as you go, and I don't see that as a better alternative.


-Rob
 

Cyriacus

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Thanks for reading. If you look at the top, you will see that this is the second level of curriculum. Following this progression, they've already been through four months of training, which has already covered proper striking methods, stances, and movements. By the time they reach this level of the curriculum they should have developed at least some passable striking technique (at least as good as your average Yellow Belt that is). The purpose of practicing drills like "Advancing with Linear Kicks and Punches" is two fold. First to disguise the basic practice. They're really just practicing kicks and punches and stances and movements, again. Second is to develop the more complex skill of moving and striking at the same time. The progression is designed to constantly reinforce already established material while adding to and evolving it over time.

That makes more sense - Much Obliged.

Another reason you see this slightly later in the curriculum is because I'm teaching a comprehensive skill set that involves far more than just kicking and punching. The students are learning how to use and respond to grabs, pushes, punches, kicks, holds, takedowns, chokes and strangulations, and weapons. So the curriculum is designed to progress through those skills as they go. That's why it begins with grabbing and pushing drills and escalates to punching and kicking, instead of starting with punching and kicking.

Interestingly, ive never heard of that approach. It may also be a good thing, so as to keep Beginners from doing things that are perhaps above their level of Understanding. Ill often see people who are shown a Front Kick, and immediately try and move it anywere above Solar Plexus Height; And succeed only in Tweaking their Hamtrings. I can see this kind of Progression being Logical.

As to the practice of "weird Stance Based Advances," that is an important part of what I teach. Punches and kicks are only as effective as the stances they are executed from and the movements that are used to bridge the gap to the opponent. So we practice those stances, both moving and in place, and then layer the striking over the top. You have to learn to stand before you learn to walk, and learn to walk before you learn to run. At least, that's how I teach karate. If you go back and look at the previous curriculum, you will see that the very first class is standing/moving in place/moving the limbs/moving the limbs and body. It's a progression to move them forward.

I can see some Students not being Patient enough for that stylus - Which is a good thing, since someone who really wants to learn Kenpo would see the Seniors doing things, and think "Hey, if i just go up one more Belt, ill be Learning stuff like that". And so begins the chain of "Ill be learning this when im promoted!", which pretty much lasts until youre a Black Belt, and can keep Students nice and Motivated :D

When I was coming up we used to walk lines in the karate school all the time. The purpose is to practice using the stances and foot maneuvers to make a consistently effective and stable mobile platform for engagement. I practice stance walking with my hands down, with my hands up, and striking. I'm a big believer in isolating and then reintegrating the various aspects of complex skills.

Now that i can relate to. Where i train TKD, we spend about 10 minutes just going up and down the Hall, first with just the Stances, then Punches, then Kicks, then Blocks. It took me almost 6 Months to work out why, but when i did, it made sense.

Thanks for your comments. I'm happy to answer any questions you have. And remember, this is just an idea. This really is somewhat representative of what I teach, I've taught every one of these drills in one form or another over the years, but I've never had a class broken up this specifically by rank, all white or all yellow. I've always taught classes with multiple ranks together, so you have to spin the plates a little and can't focus solely on perfect skill progression for one student at the perfect pace. But if I could, this is how I'd do it. More or less. And I'm always looking for ways to improve, so I appreciate the questions and the feedback. Thanks again.

Ideas are the Foundations of Great things. Whats really Important is to be Flexible. For example, one Class might not be enough to learn something, despite predicting that it would be. The ability to mesh whatever was lost back in, to ensure the Student doesnt fall behind, could be good. In fact, if its your own School, if a Student couldnt catch on to something, if they failed to Grade, you could notch them back up where they fell down, give them a Week to make sure they remember it of their own accord, then Grade them, specifically. But only once - This is more of a "Ok, so this didnt sink in right away" type thing.
Like teaching a Kata, only the Student mistakes one single movement in it.


-Rob
But ultimately, im inclined to agree that this would make for a good Foundation. On its own, it may not be the best Orange Belt initially. But in my mind, and the way i see things, every Rank is a Foundation for the next. You dont REALLY start Learning more than Foundations until youre a Black Belt. Now, that doesnt make anything less useful, of course. But if you told a White Belt to smash a board, theyd probably manage. Theyd also hurt their hand. Ask an Orange Belt the exact same thing, and theyd also manage, perhaps without hurting their hand. But it wont be too Technically testamental.
Assuming a similar logic is applied here (Which it is, based on what you were saying about Stand before you can Walk, and so forth), this will make for a very good Purple Belt, when the time comes; Also assuming that the Orange>Purple is as thorough as this.

And the Flexibility thing, to adapt to certain Students, is already covered by the other respondant, in different words.
I think really, Structures like this one are pure Guideline. Exactly what you end up doing will always vary. But youll at least have an idea of what youll be doing, and im sure that youd have left over time to play with anyway.

Truly do i love these types of Conversations.
Much Obliged
-Cyriacus
 
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Thesemindz

Thesemindz

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Here's the way I look at it. I'm teaching a technical skill. If I went to a welding school the instructor wouldn't say, "welding is an amorphous thing that comes with time. I don't plan for what I'm going to teach when, I just come in and see what my welding students are struggling with that day and I work on those skills, or whatever I'm thinking about when I come in to the school. Welding is a skill they'll develop with time, and I don't want to teach them the secret welding techniques too soon." No, a welding instructor would have textbooks, and specific activities, and a planned curriculum. It would all be right out there in the open, and the students would know exactly what to expect from their study. And the welding school would generate consistently capable welders with a consistent level of proficiency.

Now, he might make changes from class to class and student to student, and he might have to spend more time on some lessons and less time on others based on how the class is progressing. But in general, he has a plan and he knows what he's going to teach each day when he walks in to the welding class.

I've taught karate both ways. I've winged it, based on what I was working on and what the students needed, and I've taught meticulously planned progressive classes. Both have their pluses and minuses. But I think I'm better off with a plan. And for what it's worth, I've had great success teaching classes in this manner. My ground fighting curriculum was very successful as well as my karate fighting curriculum. I don't expect the students to absorb it all the first time through. I expect them to get a general idea of how to do the drill, and to get better with each successive class and rank. So I expect White Belts to be sloppy, and Yellow Belts slightly less so, and no matter which drill we're doing they should be better as Brown Belts than as Blue Belts.

The reality is that if they stay in karate they'll do these classes over and over again for the rest of their life. I still am. And as they mature in the art they'll gain new insights from each repetition and drill. But in order for me to do my best as an instructor I have to have planned out ahead of time what material I am going to teach, in what order, with what associated training exercises. Then I work my plan to the best of my ability, making changes as I go according to context. Kind of like how you would use your karate in a self defense situation.

Some students will never be able to move beyond the most basic material. I've worked with students with mental and physical challenges that required very specific tailoring of the material to their abilities. But I believe that students rise to our expectations of them. If we think they're too dumb or unskilled to do karate, then that is exactly what they will be. But if we explain that this is a difficult skill, and that we don't expect them to get it right away, and then we begin practicing then soon they are able to do things they never could before. Isn't that the point? To push our students and ourselves beyond what we are already capable of?

There's another step here too. Each time I teach I learn from the experience of teaching those classes and drills and I take that information and try to write and teach better classes the next time. I learn from my classes. My students should be the beneficiaries of that knowledge. Each time I teach a class, I should learn something that makes that class better the next time. If I'm just teaching the same classes, over and over and over again, then I lied to my students when I said there's always more to learn and deeper levels of understanding and execution. If I'm going to preach the benefits of endless repetition and constant improvement, then I need to demonstrate them in my own practice.


-Rob
 

Cyriacus

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Here's the way I look at it. I'm teaching a technical skill. If I went to a welding school the instructor wouldn't say, "welding is an amorphous thing that comes with time. I don't plan for what I'm going to teach when, I just come in and see what my welding students are struggling with that day and I work on those skills, or whatever I'm thinking about when I come in to the school. Welding is a skill they'll develop with time, and I don't want to teach them the secret welding techniques too soon." No, a welding instructor would have textbooks, and specific activities, and a planned curriculum. It would all be right out there in the open, and the students would know exactly what to expect from their study. And the welding school would generate consistently capable welders with a consistent level of proficiency.

Definately - Noone should, even if they can, learn something too fast. For example, it took me nearly an Entire Year to work out why and how Tuls (ITFTKD) and Kata worked. 6 Months ago, i could have learnt any of these Tuls, and memorised it. But i wouldnt have understood it, and would therefore have gained nothing from it. Too much too fast is great for Show, but teaches little. Let alone Technique.

Now, he might make changes from class to class and student to student, and he might have to spend more time on some lessons and less time on others based on how the class is progressing. But in general, he has a plan and he knows what he's going to teach each day when he walks in to the welding class.

Exactly what i mean by a Guideline :)

I've taught karate both ways. I've winged it, based on what I was working on and what the students needed, and I've taught meticulously planned progressive classes. Both have their pluses and minuses. But I think I'm better off with a plan. And for what it's worth, I've had great success teaching classes in this manner. My ground fighting curriculum was very successful as well as my karate fighting curriculum. I don't expect the students to absorb it all the first time through. I expect them to get a general idea of how to do the drill, and to get better with each successive class and rank. So I expect White Belts to be sloppy, and Yellow Belts slightly less so, and no matter which drill we're doing they should be better as Brown Belts than as Blue Belts.

Agreed.

The reality is that if they stay in karate they'll do these classes over and over again for the rest of their life. I still am. And as they mature in the art they'll gain new insights from each repetition and drill. But in order for me to do my best as an instructor I have to have planned out ahead of time what material I am going to teach, in what order, with what associated training exercises. Then I work my plan to the best of my ability, making changes as I go according to context. Kind of like how you would use your karate in a self defense situation.

Furthermore, it can take someone a long, long time to realise that the seemingly Basic, Beginner Techniques are often the most Complicated, despite their apparent Simplicity.

Some students will never be able to move beyond the most basic material. I've worked with students with mental and physical challenges that required very specific tailoring of the material to their abilities. But I believe that students rise to our expectations of them. If we think they're too dumb or unskilled to do karate, then that is exactly what they will be. But if we explain that this is a difficult skill, and that we don't expect them to get it right away, and then we begin practicing then soon they are able to do things they never could before. Isn't that the point? To push our students and ourselves beyond what we are already capable of?

We had a White Belt, where i Train. He was, for One Year, before he even attempted to Grade. But he was the best damn White Belt on the floor, when he finally had his, shall we say, Revelation of Understanding. I definately agree.

There's another step here too. Each time I teach I learn from the experience of teaching those classes and drills and I take that information and try to write and teach better classes the next time. I learn from my classes. My students should be the beneficiaries of that knowledge. Each time I teach a class, I should learn something that makes that class better the next time. If I'm just teaching the same classes, over and over and over again, then I lied to my students when I said there's always more to learn and deeper levels of understanding and execution. If I'm going to preach the benefits of endless repetition and constant improvement, then I need to demonstrate them in my own practice.

Endless Repetition is the Foundation of Reflex, and Automatic Deliberation. But im sure we could both Preach to that effect, so ill save some time.


-Rob

Technique especially, takes time. For example, about a Month ago, i thought my Reverse Punches were good. Now i cant believe i thought that then. In a Month, i may well think the same of now. Your Technique is NEVER Perfect. You can only Improve. And spend many, many Years improving.


And then Teach it all to some Students over the Course of about Six Years, and have them hopefully surpass you, and rinse/repeat the entire cycle with their own Students :)
 

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I understand the need for structure while teaching. It definitley makes things much easier for both the student and the instructor.

I am not trying to be flippant or rude, but shouldn't a codified fighting system include the structure to teach it? Otherwise, in my opinion, it wouldn't be very good to teach to others for the very reasons you have mentioned.
 

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