13 Grand Preservers?

astrobiologist

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Hey all,

I'm new to Chi Kung and Tai Chi Chuan. I have this short beginners book that I bought on Chi Kung. Near the end of the book there is a set uf exercises called the 13 Grand Preservers. I really like this set of exercises, they focus on taoist breathing and the movements are soft yet very energetic.

Has anyone ever heard of this set of exercises before? I think it is Shisan Bao-Tong in the mandarin (that may be pretty far off though). The book references Wang Ziping as the provider of this set, yet I haven't found any information online about his having created or shared it.
 

Xue Sheng

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Hey all,

I'm new to Chi Kung and Tai Chi Chuan. I have this short beginners book that I bought on Chi Kung. Near the end of the book there is a set uf exercises called the 13 Grand Preservers. I really like this set of exercises, they focus on taoist breathing and the movements are soft yet very energetic.

Has anyone ever heard of this set of exercises before? I think it is Shisan Bao-Tong in the mandarin (that may be pretty far off though). The book references Wang Ziping as the provider of this set, yet I haven't found any information online about his having created or shared it.

What is the title of the book and who is the author?

And do you mean this Wang Ziping

EDIT

Is it this book
 

JadecloudAlchemist

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Your book is this one?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0804817219/ref=sib_dp_pt#reader-link

I have seen the form before.

I reckon that by the 13 Grand Preservers, you refer to "Shi San Tai Bao" or "Sap Sam Tai Poh" in Cantonese, the hard chi kung (qigong) exercise whereby the practitioner can take unarmed as well as armed attacks without sustaining injury. This is an advanced chi kung exercise in Choy-Li-Fatt and some other "external" Shaolin styles. It is a very good exercise for combat efficiency, and will also promote health and vitality, but it is different in nature and purpose from the flowing energy and mind concentration of Taijiquan.
- http://www.shaolin.org/answers/ans98b/dec98-2.html

There is a good amount of Wang Ziping http://www.yongnian-taiji.co.uk/wangziping.html

I don't know where Wang Ziping learned his qigong
 

Xue Sheng

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I don't know the form and I have never seen it but I did a bit of checking and I found what JadecloudAlchemist already posted

13 Grand Preservers.... Shi San Tai Bao" (Mandarin) or "Sap Sam Tai Poh" (Cantonese).... hard qigong form... found in Choy Li Fut ... other Shaolin styles... yadda yadda yadda...DAMN :mad: he beat me to it :uhyeah:

I doubt that it originated with Wang Ziping but since he learned many styles in his lifetime I would not be surprised that he taught it.

Also it is considered and advanced form and if this is true I do not recommend it without a teacher or with out a lot of experience in Qigong. I also would not start with Taoist breathing if you have no prior experience with it.
 
OP
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Thank you all for the responses so far!

The book I have is "Beginning Qigong" by Stephen Comee. It is a very short read and does not go too much into depth about the nature of qi, but it includes several postures and instructions on breathing.

Though I am fairly new to QiGong, I have been practising several methods of breath control for a few years. I would very much like to find an instructor in Taijiquan and Qigong. Until then, I have to rely on the books and DVDs that I own. If anyone has any advice for my training or for how to properly perform a qigong set such as the one I have described, I would appreciate it.

Graham
 

JadecloudAlchemist

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I had the book I paided $1.00 or so.

I think the book took some Chinese published material and translated it.

It would explain the drawlings. The book which I think is still in book store has a decent amount of Qigong exercises I find the books moving forms to be difficult to follow.

Ken Cohen's the way of Qigong is an excellent introductory/novice book
and list a good amount of different popular Qigong forms.

I don't know the 13 grand preservers form and it has been a good 4yrs or so since I owned the book so I don't even remember the form.

However practicing slow in a relax manner,pay attention to what you are doing. Qigong for the most part is done carefully and slow. Be very careful with different breathing methods. Each one is designed for a particular reason,some contradict,some are build up forms. The subject of Qigong is vast with many forms,breathing patterns,theories and sub catagories.
 

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Is this forum still active? I hope so. This has been the only place I've found any information about this at all.
I have been working on this set for almost 9 years and there is one movement I've always gotten caught up on; 'a palm divides the flowery mound.'
If anyone would be willing to help and compare notes I'd really appreciate it.
Thank you for your time
 

Oily Dragon

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Is this forum still active? I hope so. This has been the only place I've found any information about this at all.
I have been working on this set for almost 9 years and there is one movement I've always gotten caught up on; 'a palm divides the flowery mound.'
If anyone would be willing to help and compare notes I'd really appreciate it.
Thank you for your time
Three and Ten Preservers/Protectors/Guardians.

Where did you learn it?
 

Appledog

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Hey all,

I'm new to Chi Kung and Tai Chi Chuan. I have this short beginners book that I bought on Chi Kung. Near the end of the book there is a set uf exercises called the 13 Grand Preservers. I really like this set of exercises, they focus on taoist breathing and the movements are soft yet very energetic.

Has anyone ever heard of this set of exercises before? I think it is Shisan Bao-Tong in the mandarin (that may be pretty far off though). The book references Wang Ziping as the provider of this set, yet I haven't found any information online about his having created or shared it.

Hi I am a 4th generation in the Wang Ziping lineage. Luckily our lineage has produced out a lot of decently qualified teachers but I don't know this person off-hand. I'll have to buy that book and figure out what it is that he is teaching. Anyways we don't call it thirteen grand preservers, just shi san taibao or stump qigong.

It is not usually taught on it's own or in isolation for various reasons. For one, I think people would find it incredibly boring. Also it is somewhat advanced, I guess, in it's own way. I was not shown it until after I had learned many other sets and forms. I feel that if you are going to pick up qigong from our lineage you should start with the 20 or 24 postures therapeutic qigong, as it is the most visible contribution. This '13 preservers' exercise, on the other hand, I don't understand why or how it would be taught on it's own. Certainly if you do not do the ya tui gong exercises you probably will not get much from this kind of exercise either.

Anyways you may notice that this 13 taibao shares the same name as 13 taibao from shuai jiao. They're not related, as far as I can tell, but totally different sets. If there was a specific question I would be happy to share my thoughts.
 

Appledog

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I think the book took some Chinese published material and translated it.

It would explain the drawlings. The book which I think is still in book store has a decent amount of Qigong exercises I find the books moving forms to be difficult to follow.
That would explain a lot. The book probably sucks but I'll check it out anyways. I recommend Lam Kam Chuen's "Chi Kung: The Way of Energy". It is one of the most accessible books on qigong I have seen.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Anyways you may notice that this 13 taibao shares the same name as 13 taibao from shuai jiao. They're not related, as far as I can tell, but totally different sets. If there was a specific question I would be happy to share my thoughts.
憭芯 Taibao is the prince's teacher. He helps the prince to become emperor. In MA, 13 Taibao can help you to develop better MA skill.

The 1st time I went to China (1980). I met my teacher's young brother. He asked me whether I have learner 13 Taibo and 24 Shi. I then realize how important that the old generation considered those training should be.
 

Appledog

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We call this one fisherman carries the boat.
fisherman.jpg
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Hi I am a 4th generation in the Wang Ziping lineage.
Who is your teacher from the 3rd generation of Wang Ziping? I know Wang's daughter and his granddaughter.

The referee in this picture was Wang Ziping. He was the referee when my teacher competed in that national CMA tournament.

Chang_tournament.jpg
 
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