What classics have you read?

Discussion in 'The Library' started by shesulsa, May 31, 2006.

  1. Jenna

    Jenna Senior Master

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    Wow some amazing lists you are all very well read in the best literature and NOT the loathsome Harry Potter or the awful and banal Da Vinci code pffft

    I will not list for fear of sounding pretentious but I will say Anna Karenina is my favourite for its power of emotion and her strength of integrity right to the end in her idealogical suicide and also Don Quixote because I have days where I am definitely Sancho Panza but if I am honest even more days where I am Don Quixote deluded in myself and seeing giants in windmills.....

    Yr most obdt hmble srvt,
    Jenna
     
  2. Carol

    Carol Crazy like a...

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    Dang. I love Harry Potter. Something evil about those books though, and I don't mean the witchcraft. Ms. Rowling's writing is absolutely addicting and I get sucked thoroughly in to the story...but...migod there is such an undercurrent of sadness to those stories that depresses me terribly. Even with that though...I can't wait for the next one. Go figure. Maybe it is the witchcraft ;)
     
  3. Shirt Ripper

    Shirt Ripper Black Belt

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    Steinbeck, Slaughter House 5, Catcher in the Rye, I prefer books about human performance however.
     
  4. Old Fat Kenpoka

    Old Fat Kenpoka Master Black Belt

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    Seems like some of you are interested in Science Fiction.

    Well, before I rediscovered the "Classics", I used to read tons of Sci-Fi. Quite honestly, most Sci-Fi is junk. But there is lots of good Sci-Fi. In my quest to find good Sci-Fi, I encountered two books about Sci-Fi and Fantasy written around 1979/80 by Baird Searles in the UK and some of his colleagues. He includes his recommendations for Sci-Fi and Fantasy Classics. I have read almost all of the books on this list and while some of them are very dated, they are, for the most part, very good.

    I particularly enjoyed the works of Olaf Stapledon with his sweeping trillion-year histories of evolution and galactic consciousness as well as Mervyn Peake's Gormenghast Trilogy with its truly strange characters. Enjoy.

    Reader’s Guide to Science Fiction by Baird Searles, et al. “the Five Parsec Shelf”
    1. Brian Aldiss Hothouse
    2. Poul Anderson Tau Zero
    3. Isaac Asimov The Foundation Trilogy
    4. J.G. Ballard Vermillion Sands
    5. Alfred Bester The Stars My Destination
    6. James Blish A Case of Conscience
    7. Ray Bradbury The Martian Chronicles
    8. John Brunner Stand on Zanzibar
    9. Edgar Rice Burroughs A Princess of Mars
    10. Arthur C. Clarke Childhood’s End
    11. Arthur C. Clarke The City and the Stars
    12. Hal Clement Needle
    13. Samuel Delany Dhalgren
    14. Philip K. Dick The Man in the High Castle
    15. Gordon Diskson Dorsai!
    16. Thomas M. Disch 334
    17. Harlan Ellison Dangerous Visions
    18. M. John Harrison The Centauri Device
    19. Robert A. Heinlein Citizen of the Galaxy
    20. Robert A. Heinlein The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
    21. Frank Herbert Dune
    22. William Hope Hodgson The Night Land
    23. Henry Kuttner The Dark World
    24. Henry Kuttner and CL Moore Earth’s Last Citadel
    25. Ursula K. LeGuin The Left Hand of Darkness
    26. Fritz Leiber The Big Time
    27. CS Lewis The Perelandra (Space) Trilogy
    28. HP Lovecraft At the Mountains of Madness
    29. A. Merritt The Moon Pool
    30. Walter Miller A Canticle for Leibowitz
    31. Michael Moorcock The Cornelius Chronicles
    32. Larry Niven Ringworld
    33. H Beam Piper Little Fuzzy
    34. Pohl and Kornbluth The Space Merchants
    35. Joanna Russ And Chaos Died
    36. Mary Shelley Frankenstein
    37. Cordwainer Smith Nostrilia
    38. EE Smith First Lensman
    39. Olaf Stapledon Last and First Men
    40. Olaf Stapledon Odd John
    41. Theordore Sturgeon More Than Human
    42. AE van Vogt The World of Null-A
    43. Jack Vance The Dying Earth
    44. Jules Verne From the Earth to the Moon
    45. Stanley Weinbaum A Martian Odyssey and Others
    46. HG Wells The Time Machine
    47. Jack Williamson The Humanoids
    48. Sydney Fowler Wright The World Below
    49. John Wyndham The Midwich Cuckoos
    50. Roger Zelazny Lord of Light


    Reader’s Guide to Fantasy by Baird Searles, et al. “Seven League Shelf”
    1. Poul Anderson The Broken Sword
    2. L. Frank Baum The Wizard of Oz
    3. Peter S. Beagle The Last Unicorn
    4. Ray Bradbury Dark Carnival
    5. Lewis Carroll Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
    6. Lord Dunsany The King of Elfland’s Daughter
    7. Charles G. Finney The Circus of Dr. Lao
    8. Alan Garner The Wierdstone of Brisingamen, The Moon of Gomrath
    9. Jane Gaskell The Atlan Saga
    10. Kenneth Grahame The Wind in the Willows
    11. H. Rider Haggard She
    12. William Hope Hodgson The House on the Borderland
    13. Robert E. Howard Conan
    14. M.R. James Ghost Stories of an Antiquary
    15. Rudyard Kipling The Jungle Books
    16. Fritz Leiber Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser
    17. CS Lewis Till We Have Faces
    18. HP Lovecraft The Shadow over Inssmouth
    19. George MacDonald Gifts of the Christ Child
    20. Patricia McKillip The Riddle-Master Trilogy
    21. A. Merritt The Ship of Ishtar
    22. Naomi Mitchison To the Chapel Perilous
    23. Michael Moorcock The Elric Saga
    24. CL Moore The Black Gods Shadow (Jirel of Joiry)
    25. Edith Nesbit The Five Children and It
    26. Mervyn Peake The Gormenghast Trilogy
    27. Edgar Allan Poe The Fall of the House of Usher
    28. Bram Stoker Dracula
    29. JRR Tolkien The Chronicles of Middle-Earth
    30. TH White The Once and Future King
    31. Charles Williams War in Heaven
    32. Robert Wise & Phyllis Fraser Great Tales of Terror and the Supernatural
    33. Austin Tappan Wright Islandia
     
  5. OnlyAnEgg

    OnlyAnEgg Senior Master

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    Ah, Jenna, my dear, dark angel! I must disagree! My youngest (13 year old femme) is an avid fan of that 'loathesome' Potter child. Though the path of Rowling, I have successfully introduced her to Tolkien, Orwell and Herbert. He is a fine introduction.

    My eldest was very fond of R.L. Stine's tween horror-tripe; but, her love of reading allowed me to send her the way of Orwell, Barker, Camus and others.

    As for Brown's stories...eh *shrug* He's really quite clever, though deceitful.

    So, by those treacly-sweet pathways, my children are become versed in modern classics.
     
  6. tkd_jen

    tkd_jen Purple Belt

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    I too must applaud the Harry Potter series for "re-introducing" many kids (and their parents) to reading. I am 28 and this spring read all the Potter books. I just kinda needed a nice, easy read requiring not too much thought. However, back to the topic at hand...some of my fave reads:

    East of Eden
    To Kill a mockingbird
    The Catcher in the Rye
     
  7. matt.m

    matt.m Senior Master

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    I have read so many classics that i cannot tell of them all. However, I would like to read the story of Moby Dick again. The greed and symbolism is just fantastic.[​IMG]
     
  8. Kreth

    Kreth Grandmaster

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    I just finished it last night. I found the ending rather abrupt and anticlimactic, considering the amount of detail that Melville put into the writing.
     
  9. shesulsa

    shesulsa Columbia Martial Arts Academy

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    I thought that was part of the point of the book, tho ... such enormity and detail only to find it wasn't such a big deal after all?
     
  10. Kreth

    Kreth Grandmaster

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    Interesting thought. The writing style just seemed very bare at the end, though. To give an idea... On Palm OS, Moby Dick runs just over 2900 pages. The climactic battle with the white whale only consisted of about 60 pages.
     
  11. Jenna

    Jenna Senior Master

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    Hey Egg-san :) well I would never take away the fact that the huge corporate Potter machinery has indeed drawn many a clever child and many an inquisitive adult too to reading and this on the face of it is a laudable thing if that were the intention and not solely to clear profits and bolster stock prices but there is something disagreeable about Rowling and what is made of her "poor me" background bleh....

    But the point I would want to make is that I find the whole machinations of Rowling through Bloomsbury distasteful and yes! loathsome and this great self-propelling PR machine has unfortunately pushed the classics of this very thread and those you mentioned yourself off any shelves they may have sat on before and worse than that there are a great many children who hang on EVERY word of Rowlings HP and are so wholly engulfed in the story and character and probably films too that they have no inclination whatsoever to read ANYTHING else until the next HP installment and they are certainly not at fault because what chance has Moby Dick as mentioned by Kreth and others when who ever heard of a Call me Ishmael T Shirt or a White Whale school satchel or a Moby Dick PS2 game?? And while I am ranting happily to myself I will say that despite their claims to be searching for new writing talent publishers I notice are simply seeking "the next" HP and this I think has narrowed their focus WAY down to the lowest common denominator so while HP takes up the top five shelves of our bookshops then down below are the Rowling wannabees oh as well as the blethering and nastily plagiaristic Da Vinci I mean pffft

    I am sorry for going off on one I would guess I have a problem with corporatism and what I would see as the absolutely undeniably legal and acceptABLE and acceptED monopolisation of young peoples reading habits when I would have thought we should have been encouraging a BREADTH of reading not just in young people of school age but in us all but hey shoot me for H8n on the hallowed Potter I am bulletproof anyway, ha!

    Yr most obdt hmble srvt,
    Jenna
     

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