Bujinkan v. Genbukan?

Discussion in 'Ninjutsu' started by Hudson69, Oct 8, 2009.

  1. Chris Parker

    Chris Parker Grandmaster

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    For a final point, I would recommend looking to the quote from Kyoshi Troy Wideman in Bruno's signature. That says it better than most.
     
  2. Hudson69

    Hudson69 Brown Belt

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    I think it is less of adapting (other arts techniques) to a single art than it is adapting miscelaneous techiniques from various systems based off of a personal preference. If you or I just jive with the mental/philosophical/physical aspects from one system or have a lop-sided amount of time in one system I think it might cause us to look at new techniques through EPAK or Ninpo colored glasses but for the most part I think that it is based more off of who you are and what you are comfortable with along with your ability to perform a technique in the situation presented. For those persons dedicated to one school/system they have nothing to compare anything too unless seeing a foreign systems technique they can see similarities or break down the mechanics into their systems movements.

    my opinion only and I am tired (almost off shift) so this might not flow so no chip on my shoulder, just my .02.
     
  3. Chris Parker

    Chris Parker Grandmaster

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    The problem there is that you are phrasing everything around it being a conscious decision, and that is not what you are actually dealing with. That's why I was talking about your unconscious beliefs as to what is powerful in a martial art, and that is not necessarily what you are most experienced in. You may just jive with things consciously, but under pressure, that may or may not be what comes out.

    Essentially, it needs to "jive" with your unconscious beliefs in this regard, not your conscious understanding or preference. Ideally, it will be your "prefered" system, but not always. And "a bit of this and a bit of that" approach to cross training is of no use without that base for it to work off of. But forget the idea of this being anything to do with conscious decision making, because that is one of the first things to go under pressure.
     
  4. Kajowaraku

    Kajowaraku Green Belt

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    Personally, I enjoy cross-training because it allows me to test and refine my taijutsu in new circumstances, and against people trained in different ways of doing things. Obviously the intention shouldbe made clear to the other party from the start. To give just one example: joining a judoclub for a few trainingsessions to see what and where you need to step up your training can be a good way of revealing your weak points. Obviously this is not something to be done too often, and certainly not something to be done when still unexperienced, or you'll end up confused and your MA will be weaker for it. Basicly what it can do for the more experienced (read: rooted in his art) practioner, is to force you to apply your art in situations you cannot really simulate in training. What i mean is this:

    You often get instructors giving the narrative of "what to do when attacked by a person of a specific martial art (let's use tae kwon do for an example). you get the following:

    The teachers invites his uke to attack him with a "taekwondo kick". Usually the uke will not be properly trained in typical taekwondo kicks, so the resulting kick will almost always be sloppy, probably reinforced by prejudice on account of the uke too (who probably thinks taekwondo is less effective as his own art (or i guess he'd be doing TKD)). Teacher executes countertechnque. After demonstration and explaination, students start to practice this. However, chances are really high most of them are clueless on how to properly deliver a roundhousekick or an axekick (since it's not ninpo, as Chris pointed out).

    Obviously, training this way doesn't really give you any meaningful preparation in dealing with a person that has actually trained in TKD. A practioner of TKD can kick fast, alternate the directions of his attacks rapidly, dashes about and can usually deliver quite an impact with a kick too. So, if you really want to see what your art can do for you in such circumstances, train with a real TKDka, and you'll get a much better idea.

    clearly, it's just an example, and the same goes for any other other martial art, like Judo, karate or whatever. Point is, it creates opportunities to rediscover your own art, and find ways to adapt it to different circumstances. Clearly, if you're going to do this, you shouldn't go on pretext you're interested in learning the MA you're shamelesly using to further your ninpo training :). Truth and honesty matter.123
     

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