Yoseikan budo or muy thai

Animal6

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I currently practice jjb and krav maga but I have to move soon and where I go there is no krav maga. I wonder to complete the jjb which would be better between yoseikan budo and boxing-muay thai.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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I currently practice jjb and krav maga but I have to move soon and where I go there is no krav maga. I wonder to complete the jjb which would be better between yoseikan budo and boxing-muay thai.
By JJB do you mean brazilian jujitsu, or is that another art and I'm just having a mindfart?

This might be answered by that, but what do you mean by "complete"? Do you mean to further your knowledge of that art, or become more well-rounded?
 
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Animal6

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By JJB do you mean brazilian jujitsu, or is that another art and I'm just having a mindfart?

This might be answered by that, but what do you mean by "complete"? Do you mean to further your knowledge of that art, or become more well-rounded?
I mean bjj ( jjb is in French sorry). Yoseikan budo is a mixture of karate, judo, boxing and aikido created by Hiroo Mochizuki. As you say I want to be more well-rounded.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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I mean bjj ( jjb is in French sorry). Yoseikan budo is a mixture of karate, judo, boxing and aikido created by Hiroo Mochizuki. As you say I want to be more well-rounded.
Cool, had a feeling that's what it was.

Regarding budo vs. muay thai, that's really a personal option more than anything. And is going to come down a lot to the vibe of each place and how well they mesh with you. A couple things to keep in mind though (and keep in mind this is based on generalizations of the styles):

- Muay Thai is more specified. You'll get pretty close to none of the grappling aspect, and that means that you probably won't have too much training (from there) in learning to transition between standup and ground grappling. You'd have to learn that at bjj, on your own, or find someone with more experience who can teach you that.
- Yoseikan budo will probably be more similar to krav maga in terms of material. And it should also teach you those transitional steps allowing you to use your bjj more easily.
- From my experience, a large portion of krav is learning to have an aggressive mindset. I would guess that any art that incorporates aikido will not have that, and is likely to encourage pretty much the opposite mindset. So if that aggression is something you liked about krav, then that's something to keep in mind.
- I would guess that if I were to go to 100 muay thai schools and 100 yoseikan budo one's, on average, the quality of training at the muay thai one would be higher. This is for a couple reasons, but the main ones are that a competition-focused style reinforces good training methods, it's more popular in general meaning more people are likely trying it out/a larger pool of practitioners, and being more specified to standup striking means that they can focus further on that area.
- Keep in mind with that last one, that if someone were to ask about muay thai vs. krav maga, I'd say a similar thing that the average quality of muay thai is higher than Krav maga. So it's not exactly a guarantee, just something to keep in mind.

Without trying the schools in general, there's not much more I can really recommend. If you have a website for each place, and/or videos, we could look at those, but websites aren't a perfect indicator of the schools either.
 

O'Malley

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Both will make you a more complete fighter. If I were to compare the two, Muay Thai will give you better striking ability (as it's the focus of the art), while YB will give you a bit of everything. YB could possibly teach you better how to transition from striking to grappling, and you'd be able to use your BJJ more in YB (I think they also have some judo ground grappling).

In the end, both are very solid choices. Try a couple of classes of both and pick the one you like most.
 

O'Malley

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Cool, had a feeling that's what it was.

Regarding budo vs. muay thai, that's really a personal option more than anything. And is going to come down a lot to the vibe of each place and how well they mesh with you. A couple things to keep in mind though (and keep in mind this is based on generalizations of the styles):

- Muay Thai is more specified. You'll get pretty close to none of the grappling aspect, and that means that you probably won't have too much training (from there) in learning to transition between standup and ground grappling. You'd have to learn that at bjj, on your own, or find someone with more experience who can teach you that.
- Yoseikan budo will probably be more similar to krav maga in terms of material. And it should also teach you those transitional steps allowing you to use your bjj more easily.
- From my experience, a large portion of krav is learning to have an aggressive mindset. I would guess that any art that incorporates aikido will not have that, and is likely to encourage pretty much the opposite mindset. So if that aggression is something you liked about krav, then that's something to keep in mind.
- I would guess that if I were to go to 100 muay thai schools and 100 yoseikan budo one's, on average, the quality of training at the muay thai one would be higher. This is for a couple reasons, but the main ones are that a competition-focused style reinforces good training methods, it's more popular in general meaning more people are likely trying it out/a larger pool of practitioners, and being more specified to standup striking means that they can focus further on that area.
- Keep in mind with that last one, that if someone were to ask about muay thai vs. krav maga, I'd say a similar thing that the average quality of muay thai is higher than Krav maga. So it's not exactly a guarantee, just something to keep in mind.

Without trying the schools in general, there's not much more I can really recommend. If you have a website for each place, and/or videos, we could look at those, but websites aren't a perfect indicator of the schools either.
Yoseikan Budo is a competitive style. The methodology is very different from krav maga and your argument about quality control in competitive styles applies to Yoseikan Budo as well.
 

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