Why HKD?

Kong Soo Do

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Why did you choose HKD as your martial art? What did/do you expect out of the art? What are your goals in the art? Has it met your expectations and/or would you change anything about the art if you could?​
 

WMKS Shogun

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I wanted something to compliment my Tae Kwon Do and a way to be able to include grappling in our curriculum with associated rank (because some people care about that). I learned to grapple first (through 12 years of wrestling), then moved to a year or so of Karate and Japanese Jujutsu before I finally settled on Tae Kwon Do. I first encountered Hapkido years ago through a friend and liked how well it blended with what I already knew while adding a lot of joint locks, holds, throws, and new ideas on blocks and evasions, as well as different ways of looking at kicks. Unfortunately, I did not have time to study both Tae Kwon Do and Hapkido at that time, but now have been able to remedy that. While I have only been a student of Hapkido for a few months, I an thoroughly enjoying what I am learning and look forward to learning more, both for my sake as well as that of my students'.
 

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I was impressed with Hapkido's ability to nullify the strength of an attacker and turn his own body against him. I also love how multifaceted Hapkido is, it's one of the few arts that has punching, kicking, and grappling in more or less equal parts.

It's an art that seems to be very unpredictable, often utilizing counter intuitive motion.
 

Dwi Chugi

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When I got into Hapkido I was already a black belt in Taekwondo. Even though my Taekwondo had some great self-defense techniques I felt Hapkido had so much more to offer in that area. I really like how the art is able to flow from one technique to the next. It complements most other arts or systems.

I visit quite a few martial arts studio's and using Hapkido I am able to keep up with them in their art with their rules. Hapkido, has a little bit of everything built in it. I don't feel it is a mixed martial art as much as it is a complete art. I have studied several arts and I can find Hapki techniques in each. In that, Hapkido has met my expectations.

My goal in the art is to continue to master Hapkido. To push hard and spread it to others. I think Hapkido has a bad rap with other systems of martial arts because sometimes we really do not support each other. I see Hapkido masters calling each other out on things that really should not be called out. By the way, I'm just making an observation and not calling anyone out.

The one thing I would like to see changed, is Hapkido kwans work together instead of against each other to let other systems know that Hapkido is one of the best street effective systems there is.

Just my two cents. Thanks for your time.
 

iron_ox

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Hello,

I tried Hapkido, or what I was told to don't as Hapkido, as well as a few other arts to get the best fit. I think the dynamic instructor got me hooked originaly, then meeting Grandmaster Fred Adams kept me on board. He always encouraged me to get as close to the founder of the art as I could, and I spent years doing just that.
I had the good fortune to be introduced to Grandmaster Lim Hyun Soo, one of Choi Dojunim's 4 ninth degree black belts, and I have not looked back since.
Hapkido needs a recognized hierarchy. There are all together too many medium and low ranking practitioners passings themselves off as masters, and this is surely damaging the art.
People are far more interested in trying to protect a domain rather than accepting they need to have more training under the right authority or that they got duped and are not doing Hapkido at all. I realize this is difficult, but if the art is going to survive, it is needed.
I am not saying there are not good varients out there that are good martial arts, but they need to be recognized as varients, or just something else, and not Hapkido.

As far as "calling out" other schools, if they don't Hapkido and claim to they need calling out.
 

Haakon

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I started doing TKD to first dan, it was fun I really liked it but wanted more grappling like the wrestling I did in high school. After TKD I did Aikido for a couple of years, it was Ok but I missed the punching and kicking and Aikido, at least where I trained, was to much peace and harmony and "grab my wrist". So I looked in to other styles, HKD looked like a good mix of punching, kicking, throwing, forms and weapons so I started HKD and have been doing it ever since.

I like the potential the art has for practical real world application. All of the pieces are there, the principals behind the techniques seem sound, add in some non-compliant practice against resisting partners with at least some what real world attacks and it should be about as good as any other art for practical defense, and it's a heck of a lot of fun to practice.
 

Dwi Chugi

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I think Hapkido has a bad rap with other systems of martial arts because sometimes we really do not support each other. I see Hapkido masters calling each other out on things that really should not be called out. By the way, I'm just making an observation and not calling anyone out.

The one thing I would like to see changed, is Hapkido kwans work together instead of against each other to let other systems know that Hapkido is one of the best street effective systems there is.

:)


There are all together too many medium and low ranking practitioners passings themselves off as masters, and this is surely damaging the art.
People are far more interested in trying to protect a domain rather than accepting they need to have more training under the right authority or that they got duped and are not doing Hapkido at all. I realize this is difficult, but if the art is going to survive, it is needed.
I am not saying there are not good varients out there that are good martial arts, but they need to be recognized as varients, or just something else, and not Hapkido.

As far as "calling out" other schools, if they don't Hapkido and claim to they need calling out.
 

Doomx2001

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For me, I got into Hapkido out of necessity. The Bujinkan school I was training at had moved away after about 10 years or so of training (and they have since moved back two years later.) I wanted at first, to find a Aikido school as they do joint locks and it wouldn't be that big of a transition from Bujinkan to Aikido. Also, by nature, my 'spirit' has been more 'soft'. And whenever I did my Bujinkan techniques, I looked like someone doing some internal style of Kung Fu. So I figured Aikido would be a natural fit, until I could train again in Bujinkan in which at some point I would continue training in both schools.

It didn't work out like that. And I'm glad it did.

I ended up looking into Hapkido schools, of which I had limited knowledge. I was always turned off by the acrobatic kicks. I remember watching Bong Soo Han dvds, and in pure wonder, watching him do 'magic' on peoples wrist with these little joint locks, bringing his opponent to their knees. My reaction was, 'I don't know about that', being skeptical. It wasn't until years later after watching that DvD did I find out that there is definately some merit too it.

I found a Hapkido school 50 miles from where I live. And I thought, "Can I really drive that far, everyweek, back and forth?". I was hungry, hungry to train. So I made the drive to the school. I observed at first. The whole time I wanted so bad to jump in, I'm not much on spectating. If I have to watching someone else have fun, I'd rather go home, LOL! In the middle of class, I worked up the nerve to ask If I could train, which I did, after signing a waiver.

I found that I enjoyed learning those acrobatic/high/unrealistic kicks as they limbered up the lower half of my body, making my legs more responsive to move. I still don't like acrobatic kicks for practical purposes as that would get you killed on the street, but for health reasons, I do enjoy them.

Later, in that class, I was introduced to Hapkido techniques. A knifehand armbar. Even though in my mind, I questioned the practicallity of learning defense against a wrist grab. I wasn't a woman who is going to be grabbed by a abusive boyfriend, nor was I the kind of man to stand there and let someone grab me that way. But, I've learned in my time of training in martial arts, sometimes there is a reason for everything, and you have to give things the benefit of the doubt, and give it a try.
I've since come to appreciate wrist grabs for a few reasons after some research:

1. They were probably used by Samurai and their other Asian counterparts as weapon retention. As all Japanese are right handed, they draw with their right hand toward their left side where the sword is at, this hand in turn, would be grabbed by the opponent to keep him from drawing his sword. Wrist grabs is good training for law enforcement as they have to get close to people they may not percieve as a threat, and then out of nowhere, they are attacked as the assailant tries to grab the officers gun.

2. Wrist grabs is good training for women as they are more likely to be grabbed by a abusive boyfriend, family member, or rapist.

3. I have seen some guys get pissed, grab the other guy to pull him in to punch him with his free hand so he won't have time to back up. It does happen, but not often.

4. Wrist grabs is a 'baby step' way of introducing someone to joint locks. Giving the practitioner time to focus on skill rather than just speed.

5. Defense against Judo.

Needless to say further, I am now a fan of Wrist grabs. :) HAHAHA! Its funny. But true.
But it took time for me to realize all that. That every single technique in a series ( technique sets such as Son Mok Soo, Eue Bok Soo, Ju Mok Kibon Sool...etc) are actually a stepping stone to the next, allowing me to build quick dependable skill. Its hard to see that in beginning which is why I think so many people drop out of Hapkido these days.

On to the other questions. What I hope to get out of Hapkido is what I have been getting out of Hapkido. The great thing about Hapkido is that it teaches you how to defend yourself against any grab on you body (wrist, sleeve, middle sleeve, shoulder, collar, label, belt, various grabs from behind...etc), from punches, and from kicks, as well as weapon defense. A better name for Hapkido, perhaps, is the Korean Total Self-defense System, LOL! But that is true, it is, it's all about how serious you take your training. Also, compared to Bujinkan, I have time to 'get a technique down'. In the Bujinkan, every class you learn something new, and it is never the same thing as last class. I love the fact that you never get bored with Bujinkan, and that it helps you to work 'flow'/reaction more, but with Hapkido, in most schools you work on series of techniques before moving on. The Bujinkan way is different, and I love, but I also love the Hapkido way of teaching. So I get the best of both worlds.

What I would like to change about Hapkido, regardless of Hapkido style, is the mentaility. People have watered down the art for the sake of student rentention. When you water down Hapkido, all you have then is Japanese Aikido with flashy kicks. Hapkido, is 'SUPPOSED TO HURT'! I have a saying, 'If it don't hurt, then it an't Hapkido'. Pain compliance is part of what makes joint locks work, other than good footwork, and unbalancing your opponent.
But, back to 'mentality', what I mean is this:
In ANY Brazilian Jujutsu school, a white belt in Brazilian Jujutsu can mop the ground with people who Karate, Kung Fu, Aikido, and even Hapkido. Why? Because they train with the mentality of using this in the street or in the 'cage'. They think about things like how to avoid being taken down, how to take down, how to avoid being pounded on the head...etc.
Most martial arts including most Hapkido styles are more interested in looking 'pretty', so called tradition, and retaining sensitive students than offering true Mudo. Real Traditional martial arts is about, well, basically killing or maiming your opponent before he gets the chance to do the same. I see Brazilian Jujutsu schools work an armbar until it almost reaches the breaking point before someone taps, and in some Hapkido schools people tap as soon as they are grabbed. Ridiculas.

So I would want to change the mentality and the explantions behind techniques. When I train in Hapkido, I train to defend myself, and if something don't feel effective, I ask why? Becasue I don't want to get my butt kicked and face smashed on the ground because I've been too busy learning Ballet instead of true traditional martial art. That is what I would change. And if we could do that, Hapkido would be heading more in the right direction, instead of becoming a product of McDojo's.

One of the other questions that Kong Soo Do had was what were my expectations. I've learned not to have any. That way you will accept a martial art for what it is, instead of what it is not. And with that train of thought, I can walk into any dojo or school, and get something out of it. I've learned to appreciate all martial arts because of this 'thinking'.

Good questions.

- Brian
 
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Dwi Chugi

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What I would like to change about Hapkido, regardless of Hapkido style, is the mentaility. People have watered down the art for the sake of student rentention. When you water down Hapkido, all you have then is Japanese Aikido with flashy kicks. Hapkido, is 'SUPPOSED TO HURT'! I have a saying, 'If it don't hurt, then it an't Hapkido'. Pain compliance is part of what makes joint locks work, other than good footwork, and unbalancing your opponent.
But, back to 'mentality', what I mean is this:
In ANY Brazilian Jujutsu school, a white belt in Brazilian Jujutsu can mop the ground with people who Karate, Kung Fu, Aikido, and even Hapkido. Why? Because they train with the mentality of using this in the street or in the 'cage'. They think about things like how to avoid being taken down, how to take down, how to avoid being pounded on the head...etc.
Most martial arts including most Hapkido styles are more interested in looking 'pretty', so called tradition, and retaining sensitive students than offering true Mudo. Real Traditional martial arts is about, well, basically killing or maiming your opponent before he gets the chance to do the same. I see Brazilian Jujutsu schools work an armbar until it almost reaches the breaking point before someone taps, and in some Hapkido schools people tap as soon as they are grabbed. Ridiculas.

So I would want to change the mentality and the explantions behind techniques. When I train in Hapkido, I train to defend myself, and if something don't feel effective, I ask why? Becasue I don't want to get my butt kicked and face smashed on the ground because I've been too busy learning Ballet instead of true traditional martial art. That is what I would change. And if we could do that, Hapkido would be heading more in the right direction, instead of becoming a product of McDojo's.

One of the other questions that Kong Soo Do had was what were my expectations. I've learned not to have any. That way you will accept a martial art for what it is, instead of what it is not. And with that train of thought, I can walk into any dojo or school, and get something out of it. I've learned to appreciate all martial arts because of this 'thinking'.

Good questions.

- Brian

Doomx2001,

Great Post! I have already put into effect real live training at my Dojang. I believe it is the true way to teach what could one day save a life.

Keep up the good work.
 
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iron_ox

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So Shelby,

What do you we do with 1st degree black belts Dan issueing 9th dan certificates? Do we just presume that type of behavior is OK? Do you have much experience with a variety of so called Hapkido "styles"? If so, do really think that even those of dubious origin be given credence?
Should we all just smile and pretend behavior like that mentioned above doesn't matter? Your thoughts.
 

Instructor

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Whatever differences the various orgs might have with one another surely the best way to resolve them is with communication and cooperation.
 

iron_ox

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Whatever differences the various orgs might have with one another surely the best way to resolve them is with communication and cooperation.
How does one cooperate with those that are simply not being honest at all? That have taken Hapkido from its Founder, Choi Dojunim, and turned it into a mish-mash of "styles"?
 

Instructor

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People will often dissapoint you in life, sad but true. The art however is sound. In any art you will have a movement towards the source wanting to maintain purity and a movement from the source wanting to innovate.

Sad to say you will also have copycats that are just trying to line their pockets. The best thing to do is to teach and study your art and try to be above board yourself. Lead by example and let the chips fall where they may.
 

Dwi Chugi

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So Shelby,

What do you we do with 1st degree black belts Dan issueing 9th dan certificates? Do we just presume that type of behavior is OK? Do you have much experience with a variety of so called Hapkido "styles"? If so, do really think that even those of dubious origin be given credence?
Should we all just smile and pretend behavior like that mentioned above doesn't matter? Your thoughts.

I never heard of a 1st Dan issuing 9th Dans. I am surethings like that have happened. I have heard of Korean Masters coming to theUSA and inflating their ranks. I pick onthe Koreans because that is what I have experience with. I never said this was ok for people to issueranks that they do not have. I neverimplied this was ok either. At least Ido not think I implied that I thought it was ok. If I did imply it was ok toinflate your rank, I am denouncing it now.
I personally dont look at rank as how good someone is. I look at rank as a process that one person (anygiven master) gives another person (any given student) to make them feel goodabout themselves. In psychology, we callthat a token economy.
As my good Friend Brian says: Dan Ranking without meritor authority is bad and unethical. Butsaying you are preparing someone for street-defense and simply teaching them techniquesthat have been passed down as a tradition and not live training or adapting to themodern world, is much worse.
Have I dabbled in other systems to make my MuSool Hapkidobetter? You bet you! Why? Well, first inthe spirit of Grandmaster Choi, I want to make sure my Hapkido keeps up withthe fighting styles of today.
I ask you, have you ever thrown an outer wristthrow? Have you ever thrown an outerwrist throw sparring? Do you spar? Haveyou ever thrown it in a combative situation? I HAVE. I have thrown it in sparring in Hapkido,rolling at a Jiujutsu school and fighting at a Krav Maga school. On top of that, I threw it on someone while Iwas working a personal security detail with the country band Montgomery Gentry. I know my outer wrist throw works because Iventure outside of my Hapkido bubble. Ialso know my standing straight arm bar works, my goose neck wrist lock, my hipthrow or my hammer lock because I use it with partners that are not from my art. Furthermore I have students go to otherprograms and use MuSool Hapkido so they know it works for them. I also have students that use MuSool Hapkido aspolice officers and correction officers.
I feel I am a traditionalist Hapkidoin. I am not the same traditional Hapkido of JungKi Hapkido or Sin Moo Hapkido, or Dynamic Hapkido or Combat Hapkido or anyother traditional Korean or American Hapkido system. They all come from different lines of Kwansand I respect them but I do not always agree with what I see with the videos theyput out or the instruction they give. Ido not bad mouth them openly. I will say something if I see a video of a Hapkidoguy throw someone without touching them because that truly gives us a bad name.
I do have some experience with other Hapkido Kwansbesides my own. Some are better thanothers. If I am at one of their schools or if someone from another kwan is atMuSool Academy, I give my opinion on what I think is best in a street defensivesituation. If they wish to listen, they learn. If they do not listen, calling them out over the World Wide Web is notgoing to change them. I have also pickedup things that I thought was useful and added it to MuSool Hapkido.
We are not the HAPKIDO Police. All I can do is teach what I believe is thebest self-defense system in the world. Igo to other martial arts and share with them what I feel is great Hapkido. A lot of systems think we are a joke and thatHapkido Sucks. I try to change theirmind and I do pretty good job at convincing them that not all Hapkido is thesame.
I am not an Orthodox Program. I do not teach the way Grandmaster Choitaught and never claimed too. I probablydid not learn how the first generation students of Grandmaster Choilearned. I do believe fighting styleshave changed from the late 1940s to today. I think some of the authentic Hapkido that worked in the 1950s and 60swont work for todays fighting styles. Fightingsystems and styles changed in the 1970s and again in the 1990s. I think if your Hapkido does not change withit, then you may be teaching an authentic martial art that may not work when alife is on the line.
Look at the traditional martial sports of Judo andTaekwondo. Both of those systems havechanged over the years. The way youwould defend against those arts in the 1960s are different than the way youwould defense against them today.
Just my two cents worth.
 

oftheherd1

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Why did you choose HKD as your martial art? What did/do you expect out of the art? What are your goals in the art? Has it met your expectations and/or would you change anything about the art if you could?​

I studied TKD briefly in the mid-60s. I liked what I was taught, but was unable to continue. In the mid-70s, while in Korea, I saw it demonstrated along with many other MA on a TV program, and frankly, thought it was largely bogus at first. The third time I was in Korea, I discovered it at the on-post gym. By then I had learned that it was a for-real MA and was very interested in an art that taught what it did. I was delighted and began immediately. I have never looked back.

What I expect out of the art is what I was taught. It includes how to protect and subdue (primarily defensivly, but offensively as well), and how to keep myself in shape. It includes use of gi (ki, chi, or whatever term you prefer), but doesn't include any mysticism about it.

It has met my expectations and more.

I am a 2nd Dan, with training in all the techniques to 3rd dan, but haven't tested that and probably never will. I don't think I know enough to have any standing to suggest changes, at least in the Hapkido I learned, as I learned it. It is a very good art, and teaches defenses against all types of attacks. Its philosophy doesn't seek combat, but doesn't shy from it when defense is needed, nor worry about damage to an opponent when used.

I think the explanation of why to start with wrist grabs above is good, and needed. I so often hear put downs for the "hey, grab my wrist," when it is justifiable as defense against swordsmen, starting with basics, and just heartfelt exuberance at good grappling. It is a good thing to like and believe in the MA you are studying, but if you can only justify its existence by putting down other MA, that is sad, and doesn't show good thinking.

My two cents.
 

iron_ox

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People will often dissapoint you in life, sad but true. The art however is sound. In any art you will have a movement towards the source wanting to maintain purity and a movement from the source wanting to innovate.

I think the art is sound, but the reality is that Hapkido is often seen very poorly through the eyes of other arts with no central structure, and far too much variance on history, technique and even purpose.

Sad to say you will also have copycats that are just trying to line their pockets. The best thing to do is to teach and study your art and try to be above board yourself. Lead by example and let the chips fall where they may.

I think this is a bit of a cop out. Do you not think that it is of great importance to be able to call out people that openly damage the art? Without naming anyone, look at the actions of a Florida man that all but destroyed a large organization in 2002.
 

iron_ox

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I never heard of a 1st Dan issuing 9th Dans. I am surethings like that have happened. I have heard of Korean Masters coming to theUSA and inflating their ranks. I pick onthe Korean’s because that is what I have experience with. I never said this was ok for people to issueranks that they do not have. I neverimplied this was ok either. At least Ido not think I implied that I thought it was ok. If I did imply it was ok toinflate your rank, I am denouncing it now.

I don't want to engage in pointing out which organization is headed by a first dan, and issuing 9th dans...its easy to find out, if you are interested, I can PM you. And no, you never implied that is was OK, but it is prolific in Hapkido...and something that absolutely undermines the art.

I personally don’t look at rank as how good someone is. I look at rank as a process that one person (anygiven master) gives another person (any given student) to make them feel goodabout themselves. In psychology, we callthat a token economy.

Rank in an art that issues should give someone an idea of hierarchy - the fact that Hapkido rank is issued by many who do not have it is a problem, and something that should be openly addressed.

As my good Friend Brian says: Dan Ranking without merit or authority is bad and unethical. But saying you are preparing someone for street-defense and simply teaching them techniques that have been passed down as a tradition and not live training or adapting to the modern world, is much worse.

Choi Dojunim modified his art right from the beginning, unfortunately many never bothered to learn what he was actually teaching. All of Hapkido is "live training" (in my opinion a silly buzz word to try and make a sporting art closer to a self defense art) - but again, there is a huge gap in knowledge when people think that wrist grabs, as an example, are not part of a larger picture that teach motion and energy for better defensive fighting.

Have I dabbled in other systems to make my MuSool Hapkido better? You bet you! Why? Well, first in the spirit of Grandmaster Choi, I want to make sure my Hapkido keeps up with the fighting styles of today.

Choi Dojunim died in 1986, he taught actively until 1984 - his art was far more "current" than you might imagine.

I ask you, have you ever thrown an outer wrist throw? Have you ever thrown an outer wrist throw sparring? Do you spar? Have you ever thrown it in a combative situation? I HAVE. I have thrown it in sparring in Hapkido,rolling at a Jiujitsu school and fighting at a Krav Maga school. On top of that, I threw it on someone while I was working a personal security detail with the country band Montgomery Gentry. I know my outer wrist throw works because I venture outside of my Hapkido bubble. I also know my standing straight arm bar works, my goose neck wrist lock, my hip throw or my hammer lock because I use it with partners that are not from my art. Furthermore I have students go to other programs and use MuSool Hapkido so they know it works for them. I also have students that use MuSool Hapkido as police officers and correction officers.


Yes, I have had a few run ins over the years. I have taught and trained for more than 30 years, on four continents, I have owned a security company (and got training from a raft of security professionals - not just Hapkido training), and done security work in the US and Europe. I am ranked in several styles, and trained at dozens of non-Hapkido schools. Did I answer your question?

I feel I am a traditionalist Hapkidoin. I am not the same traditional Hapkido of JungKi Hapkido or Sin Moo Hapkido, or Dynamic Hapkido or Combat Hapkido or any other traditional Korean or American Hapkido system. They all come from different lines of Kwans and I respect them but I do not always agree with what I see with the videos they put out or the instruction they give. I do not bad mouth them openly. I will say something if I see a video of a Hapkido guy throw someone without touching them because that truly gives us a bad name.

As a point of information, I am a member of the Jungki Kwan, I teach Hapkido, not "Jungki Hapkido"... But I agree that there is plenty of video out there that also makes me scratch my head.

I do have some experience with other Hapkido Kwans besides my own. Some are better than others. If I am at one of their schools or if someone from another kwan is at MuSool Academy, I give my opinion on what I think is best in a street defensive situation. If they wish to listen, they learn. If they do not listen, calling them out over the World Wide Web is not going to change them. I have also picked up things that I thought was useful and added it to MuSool Hapkido.

Hopefully you would not "call out" anyone that did not deserve it - but if they have no true lineage in that art, hopefully you would feel the need to warn others.

We are not the HAPKIDO Police. All I can do is teach what I believe is the best self-defense system in the world. I go to other martial arts and share with them what I feel is great Hapkido. A lot of systems think we are a joke and that Hapkido Sucks. I try to change their mind and I do pretty good job at convincing them that not all Hapkido is the same.

If you don't feel the need to be a watchdog for the art, so be it, that is not a requirement. Do you find it odd what you make in the last part of your statement? If its called Hapkido, it should....in reality...all be what similar if not the same?

I am not an Orthodox Program. I do not teach the way Grandmaster Choi taught and never claimed too. I probably did not learn how the first generation students of Grandmaster Choi learned. I do believe fighting style shave changed from the late 1940’s to today. I think some of the authentic Hapkido that worked in the 1950’s and 60’swon’t work for today’s fighting styles. Fighting systems and styles changed in the 1970’s and again in the 1990’s. I think if your Hapkido does not change with it, then you may be teaching an authentic martial art that may not work when a life is on the line.

I agree that your idea is correct, but the art of Choi Dojunim changed and progressed throughout his lifetime. And I say this to everyone - if they have never actually seen Choi Dojunim's art, it is odd they think it needs modifying or correcting.

Look at the traditional martial sports of Judo and Taekwondo. Both of those systems have changed over the years. The way you would defend against those arts in the 1960’s are different than the way you would defense against them today.

I don't know much about Judo, but next time you are in Scotland, go and meet Taekwondo IX Dan Rhee, Ki Ha. He might change your mind about TKD being for sport at all...not really his thing, and amazing exponent.

Great post, Mr. Creech, but I believe that anyone that is involved in Hapkido should care about how the art is portrayed based on how other organizations rank and include their lineage. Not a requirement, and teaching well is the most important thing, and teaching great self-defense really matters even more than that, but there is no time to bury our heads in the sand and act like anyone can say whatever they want about this art without being able to back it up.
 
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