When taking on students...

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Firona

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As a master of a martial art I have come to a point where I want to take on students. The question I want to ask is: Is it better for a student to have some martial arts background or none at all? I have two students at the present time, one of them is a blue belt in Tae Kwan Do (feel free to slap me if that is misspelled) and the other is a fourth cu (cue?) from Aikido. Both of them are doing quite well but I was wondering if the situation changes for someone who has never done martial arts before. Another question was how do you deal with the other martial arts teachings getting in the way of your own? I was hoping to get some speculation or some experienced answers on these topic so this seemed like the place to find it. Thanks peeps.
 

Ceicei

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What style are you teaching? Regardless of whether they are experienced previously with other martial arts or not, they still need to learn your style's basics before going into the more complex moves. The students need to understand that in learning your style, they will need to "empty their cup" first and be willing to learn. That said, they will, of course, bring their knowledge of other styles with them and that will be evident. Different styles have different ways of doing stances, footwork, and handwork. For them to learn, they need to start from the beginning. Once they gain more experience with your style, they will be able to meld their two styles together to make it work for them.

- Ceicei
 

TigerWoman

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I would agree with Ceicei about emptying their cup...they have to start at your beginning. My daughter after 9 years of TKD was learning Kung Fu and had to do just that, she realized. She noticed the stances were much deeper although we were taught and were used to fairly low stances in our school, it still wasn't the same. So, if they want to learn a new style, they really have to start at the beginning. I have been thinking the same thing, willing to start at the beginning. But not too much to pick from around here.
Karate or Taekwondo mostly. What is your style? TW
 
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Firona

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Sorry I didn't specify before what style I use. I have been practicing martial arts for about ten years now and I have developed a style called Maelstrom. It's a unity of opposites based martial art that teaches principals based on the bodies energy (Ki) and the different states of the mind. I will be publishing a book on it in a few years if I can get enough students to make it...noteable hehe.
 

TigerWoman

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Firona, I had to look, after you stated you were in martial arts for ten years. Your birth date shows you are 17. I would be careful about saying you are a master unless you have the credentials to prove it. In TKD that wouldn't be until age 25 at least and that is starting at age 5 or 6. Even then, it would be difficult to acquire adults and even parents who would be looking for experience in teaching their little ones. I hope I don't sound harsh but I wouldn't consider someone so young a master of anything at this stage in their life. We already have a thread about this in "Taekwondo Years Rank". If you have students already, you are doing well however. I hope you continue to study yourself though...best wishes, TW
 

Ceicei

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Would you please explain more about Maelstrom? From what you said, it seems to be more of a philosophy, or does it also emphasize some certain physical motions?

- Ceicei
 
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Firona

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In answer to whether or not I am a master: I know it sounds little pompous and really seems as though I am one of those 'invincible' teenagers, the truth is I am a highly skilled martial artist. My father and uncles all studied martial arts so I was practicing from a young age in many different styles (Taekwando, Judo, Karate, and a little Jiu Jitsu) So far I am undefeated in any formal match including three fights with instructors (a first dan of karate and two third dan in aikido) So I hope it doesn't sound like i'm bragging, or lying for that matter, but I am qualified. Believe me, don't believe me, it doesn't really matter. As for Maelstrom, the idea is as thus: an idea. Mostly I find that a martial art is built around the basis of the mind and principles rather than moves. I always tell people who ask about it "You can have the sharpest blade but it will do no good until you know how to use it," Essentially when learning Maelstrom I teach about using energy and understanding movements on top of improving reaction time and such initially. Once a student has learned the principals I move them into actual moves which are in four categories. Earth: which teaches about grappling and taking blows Air: Quick movement and avoiding hits Fire: Devestating attacks and chaotic movements and Water: disabling and peaceful movement. This can all be taken more in depth, talking about how earth and water are defensive and air and fire are offensive but I will spare you from my ramblings. So in answer to your question (I guess my ramblings got you anyway) Maelstrom has a strong philosophical edge which I emphasize because that is all that really makes it different. I hope that helped to clear things up.
 

hedgehogey

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Well, since you're so skilled, when exactly are we going to see your "maelstrom" in a no holds barred tournament?

Also: You claim knowledge of TKD, judo, jiujitsu and karate. Where and when did you learn these styles?
 
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Firona

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Well that's why I started this thread in the first place. I have just started teaching it to other people and I am still figuring out the basics of working with students.
 

jfarnsworth

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Firona said:
As a master of a martial art I have come to a point where I want to take on students.
OK, I give. That answer comes from the other thread you started somewhere else.
The question I want to ask is: Is it better for a student to have some martial arts background or none at all?
It shouldn't matter either way. If they have no skills then an instructor should be able to teach them correctly from day one. If they already have skills a skilled instructor will have to take a little more time to corrrect errors in which the new M.A. may have.
I have two students at the present time, one of them is a blue belt in Tae Kwan Do (feel free to slap me if that is misspelled) and the other is a fourth cu (cue?) from Aikido.
What art are you teaching? Also, it's Kyu.
Both of them are doing quite well but I was wondering if the situation changes for someone who has never done martial arts before.
Read first post.
Another question was how do you deal with the other martial arts teachings getting in the way of your own? I was hoping to get some speculation or some experienced answers on these topic so this seemed like the place to find it.
Teaching is training. To teach is to learn and understand the material better. If you think that is getting in the way of your own training then maybe you should teach for 1 year and practice on your own. Re-evaluate yourself 1 year later and see if you gained any insight into the M.A. in which you study/teach.
Thanks peeps
Hopefully you found this post insightful. :asian:
 

Rob Broad

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Firona

I am sorry but nobody is a master in 10 yrs as you stated that is about as long as you have trained. Regardless of whether you have beat a 1st Dan and karate and some 2nd Dans in Aikido, that does not constitute that you are a master. Most styles have a significant point where the title master is put upon on the istructor in most styles of karate it is at 5th Dan in TKD it is at 4th Dan. If you follow North America's accelerated times for advanced belts it is still impossible for you to be considered a master. Most styles have a period of 2 yrs from 1st Dan to 2nd Dan, then 3 yrs from 2nd Dan to 3rd dan, 4 yrs from 3rd Dan to 4th Dan that is 9yrs after 1st Dan then there is another 5 yrs from 4th dan to 5th Dan that puts it up to 13 yrs already. Unless you were born in a Gi and had a belt for an umbilical cord don't call yourself a master.

There are many threads on this forum about peole starting thier own stykes I woudl suggest you spend some time in some formalized martial arts schools and get some life experience before trying to create your own style.
 
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Firona

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eck why does this keep coming up? The point of the thread was not to say, "Look at me I am the young masta!" it was to get some insight on teaching. I know that I am young and 'inexperienced' but you have to trust that I am not your average teenager. In any case, when posting let's not say that I have no life experience and let's not say that I haven't got the experience let us just assume that perhaps, in the future even, I will be taking on students and want to know about teaching.
 

Rob Broad

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To get the experience to be a good teacher, go to a repuatbel school and learn how to teach. Then you will know the advantages and disadvantages of working with peopel who have experience in other arts.
 

Han-Mi

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Well, I had a long post but AOL screwed up so ill just have to give you the cliff notes.

I am 20, I have 13 years experience in traditional TKD and suplemental training in many of the other hard styles. I was a first dan when I was 15 and my second when I was 17. I did no understand my real potential until I was at least 18 and I did not understand the significance of what I knew. I can only assume that you are a normal teen and do not have the mental capacity to know what the MA's truly are about. I understand that age is not everything but, it is a factor. I only get down on you to discourage your use of the word master when refering to yourself. You will not be taken serioulsy until you give that up. It doesn't matter who you beat, it is possible that their trainging was of poor quality and attained rank because they paid for it. Trust me, you will be better off if you never call yourself a master.

Assuming you are a prodigy among prodigies, do not overload your students, only explain what they will be able to comprehend, you can always elaborate later. It will not be easy to attain new students with your limited experience and not having a style or lineage that can be researched but, they will come if you provide a good service. Do not be impatient and try to figure out other things to equate your teachings to, give your students reference points that they are familiar with. Try having an instructor, that you respect, watch you teach and give you suggestions.

A couple of questions:
Do you have any formal training from instructors other than your family?

If so: who, what, where, when, how long?

If not: Why not? your family had to learn it like that.


It sounds to me like you do not have proper trainging, or you would probably be more modest and would not be teaching other students when you still have so much to learn.

Yes, that's the cliff notes, can you imagine what I wrote the first time?

It just happened again... I HATE AOL!!!!!

ME--> :whip:<--AOL
 

Han-Mi

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Oh ya... you style sounds like a compilation album from Kung fu. Where did you get your idea to create this style?
 

John Bishop

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"Maelstrom" appears to be a video game, not a martial art.

From Google:

Maelstrom 3.0

You pilot your ship through the dreaded "Maelstrom" asteroid belt -- suddenly your best friend thrusts towards you and fires, directly at your cockpit. You raise your shields just in time, and the battle is joined.
The deadliest stretch of space known to mankind has just gotten deadlier. Everywhere massive asteroids jostle for a chance to crush your ship, and deadly shinobi fighter patrols pursue you across the asteroid belt. But the deadliest of them all is your sister ship, assigned to you on patrol. The pilot, trained by your own Navy, battle hardened by months in the Maelstrom, is equipped with a twin of your own ship and intimate knowledge of your tactics.
The lovely Stratocaster R&R facility never sounded so good, but as you fire full thrusters to dodge the latest barrage you begin to think you'll never get home...

 

DeLamar.J

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Firona said:
As a master of a martial art I have come to a point where I want to take on students. The question I want to ask is: Is it better for a student to have some martial arts background or none at all? I have two students at the present time, one of them is a blue belt in Tae Kwan Do (feel free to slap me if that is misspelled) and the other is a fourth cu (cue?) from Aikido. Both of them are doing quite well but I was wondering if the situation changes for someone who has never done martial arts before. Another question was how do you deal with the other martial arts teachings getting in the way of your own? I was hoping to get some speculation or some experienced answers on these topic so this seemed like the place to find it. Thanks peeps.
You being master of a martial art, I have nothing of value to say to you that you dont already know. :bow:
 

Robert Carver

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You wouldn't by chance be related to a former member that went by the username "Lonewolf" would you? He had the same arrogant attitude and even named his style of Jujutsu after a Japanese anime series.

You have a LOT to learn. After 32 years of training, I would never presume to refer to myself as a "Master" of anything. Heck, I have an obi that is older than you are.

Grow up and go get some real training. :rolleyes:
 
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Firona

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We are getting down to word usage now people. My intention is not come off arrogant, as I have said in another post, and my intention was not to advertise my theories on the martial arts, as said in another post. Yes, using the word 'master' was a mistake but at the time it was easier than typing 'someone who has just come to the point of knowing a good deal about a martial art and wanting to share knowledge with other people' I appologize to anyone I have offended in these past posts. One point I would like to bring foreward is, you have no right to assumed I have 'a lot to learn' nor to you have any right to be insulting me in private messages. Those of you who message me telling me you have so much more experience and that I should go and join a 'true' martial art school, well I am not sure if you have noticed but you are the arrogant ones. I am sorry I had to have a little tantrum in here but it should be known that I am not the antogonist here, I am just asking a simple question.
 

Brother John

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Firona said:
As a master of a martial art I have come to a point where I want to take on students.

Firona-Please understand, I know where you are coming from. I'm now entering my 25th year of training in the martial arts...and like you...in more than one system. BUT: having been around the block as you have, you Must understand that we martial artists REALLLLLLY take the term MASTER seriously. Some of us have known or trained with those who've earned the title. Virtually NO ONE who earned it, uses it in refering to themselves. That's probably why you've gotten the reaction that you have.

Being 'able' and being 'knowledgable' is a part of the equation for being a martial arts expert...but mastership is WAY beyond that! Way. It takes time and a full well rounded experience of every facet of your art/system. If you are just now wanting to get into instructing...then there's an aspect of your art that you don't yet know...let alone understand or have experience in; and I challenge you that IT is the most challenging facet of any art. You really learn your style all over again. Because not only do you have to impart your knowledge, but you will have to put it in such a way that those who aren't as much of a prodigy as you will gain and grow from it. And this process is repeated over and over in many different ways.

I encourage you to continue in your line of thinking. STUDY the art of instructing DEEPLY. Continue to find new ways to forge your different disciplines into a unified whole... BUT HOLD OFF on either:
1. Claiming you have "created" a new art.
2. Claiming you are a 'master' of anything besides your own opinion.

Trust me!

Your Brother
John
 
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