What about practicing martial arts with near-sightedness? I heard about retinal detachment.

Pier033

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Is it possibile to practice martial arts with near-sightedness? Do I risk retinal detachment?

Thank you for reading, have a good day.
 

Tez3

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You don't risk retinal detachment anymore than anyone else. Contact lenses are your friend, daily disposable ones are great. I am shortsighted as well as having astigmatism and have worn lenses for years.
 

Tony Dismukes

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Is it possibile to practice martial arts with near-sightedness? Do I risk retinal detachment?

Thank you for reading, have a good day.
Near-sightedness is not a problem. Im near-sighted and so are many of my students and training partners.

Ive been training martial arts for 37 years and I dont think Ive met anyone who suffered retinal detachment as a result of their martial arts practice. I suppose its theoretically possible as the result of a training accident that caused an injury to the eye, but thats not really a common occurrence.
 

Yokozuna514

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How near sighted are you ? If you can not effectively see a person standing an arms length away from you, you may want to consider sticking to a grappling art as opposed to a striking art. If you can wear contacts, that may help but remember that the contacts may move slightly when you move your head quickly so you may lose focus on your opponent initially until you get used to it. I agree with The other posters about the risk not being any greater for retinal detachment all things considered equally.
 

Dirty Dog

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Is it possibile to practice martial arts with near-sightedness? Do I risk retinal detachment?

Thank you for reading, have a good day.

I only have one eye, and it's quite near sighted. Isn't a problem. Retinal detachment is way way way down on the list of possible injuries from MA practice.
 

_Simon_

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My instructor had retinal detachment from a full contact tournament injury... a freak thing I think, but it can happen. Ended his tournament days, but probably such a rare occurrence.

Wouldn't worry about it happening, go train and have fun :)
 

Leviathan

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I had already considered the question as I am nearsighted as well.

If you're going for a martial arts with little or no contact to the head (karate shotokan, tai chi) it shouldn't be an issue.

If you go for contact, especially full contact (boxing, Muay Thai), that seems possible at least in theory. In practice though I have never heard of a boxer or Thai boxer (or soccer player) suffering something like that, even when competing at a fairly high level so I wouldn't worry too much about that. Or have you experienced some problem of that kind already? You suffer any serious condition with your eyes? Are you highly nearsighted?

Lenses are not always suitable. They were fine when I practiced karate shotokan but when I switched to Muay Thai I lost one lens during the first training (quite a few punches in the head) so I trained without any visual correction from then on. That worked fine.

If you had had eye surgery like LASIK I would be very cautious because that weakens the cornea but that's another topic.
 

Gerry Seymour

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I'm far-sighted, but enough that everything is blurry without correction, at any distance. I train as much as I can with my glasses, and just take them off for any free-sparring, resistive drills, etc. For basic drills, I can leave them on, take falls, etc. without issue. I've tried to get contacts, but I have trouble getting them in and out. My eyes only barely open enough for them, and in about an hour of attempts at the optometrist's office, I managed to get both in and one out (doc had to remove the other for me, because I had to get out of there), so I never got around to getting any.

I had a student who wore contacts, and never had an issue, except when I stole one from his eye (did it twice - apparently, I poke people in the eyes more than I thought). I had a training partner who simply opted for sports goggles, which I should probably do at some point.
 

JR 137

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I had already considered the question as I am nearsighted as well.

If you're going for a martial arts with little or no contact to the head (karate shotokan, tai chi) it shouldn't be an issue.

If you go for contact, especially full contact (boxing, Muay Thai), that seems possible at least in theory. In practice though I have never heard of a boxer or Thai boxer (or soccer player) suffering something like that, even when competing at a fairly high level so I wouldn't worry too much about that. Or have you experienced some problem of that kind already? You suffer any serious condition with your eyes? Are you highly nearsighted?

Lenses are not always suitable. They were fine when I practiced karate shotokan but when I switched to Muay Thai I lost one lens during the first training (quite a few punches in the head) so I trained without any visual correction from then on. That worked fine.

If you had had eye surgery like LASIK I would be very cautious because that weakens the cornea but that's another topic.
Theodore Roosevelt suffered a detached retina from boxing. Now youve heard of a specific case.

Its certainly not an everyday thing in boxing, but it happens enough to say so. I wouldnt worry about it if theres no previous retinal issues.

Near sighted, far sighted, et al wont realistically put anyone at further risk of retinal detachment. I guess you could be at increased risk of a detachment if you cant see right and are constantly getting hit in the head because of it, but thats a bit of a stretch. The issue with that stuff is the lens of the eye, not the retina. The retina is like a sheet of paper on the inside back surface of the eye. The lens is pretty much in the pupil.

Getting hit in the head can definitely detach your retina. Highly unlikely, but it can happen.
 

jobo

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How near sighted are you ? If you can not effectively see a person standing an arms length away from you, you may want to consider sticking to a grappling art as opposed to a striking art. If you can wear contacts, that may help but remember that the contacts may move slightly when you move your head quickly so you may lose focus on your opponent initially until you get used to it. I agree with The other posters about the risk not being any greater for retinal detachment all things considered equally.
if you practise with iut correction, then you signal processing will improve to compensate, if you practise in glasses and remove/ loose them in a fight you will really struggle to process the information as you depth perception will be all wrong and things will move to one side or the other or up or down or all of these
 

Xue Sheng

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Is it possibile to practice martial arts with near-sightedness? Do I risk retinal detachment?

Thank you for reading, have a good day.

Practiced Martial arts with near-sightedness for over 30 years with no issue. Then I had cataract surgery and got lenses implants. Then I got hit right in the eye and ended up with a detached retina. If I had still been near sighted I do not think it would have happened. I always bought glasses with safety lenses and was hit many times over the years with no issue, because the glasses took the hit and my eye didn't. But without the glasses I got hit, right in my open eye and a few days later the retina became an issue. I was never told prior to the detachment to stop training martial arts and it was not until the second detachment in the same eye that I was told training and getting hit in the head may not be something I should be doing on a regular basis by the guy who did my retina surgery.

But also take into account that I am not a doctor or an eye specialist so take what I say with a grain of salt. If you are truly concerned you need to talk to your eye doctor
 

jobo

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Unfortunately nearsightedness is a risk factor for retinal detachment (but not the only one):

Retinal detachment - Wikipedia
it doesn't really say that, it does say that severe myopia is a risk factor, that in excess of - 6 , but it's not at all clearly that myopia less than this is a problem or even why severe myopia is an issue, as the actual causes of my opiate are not clearly understood and vary substanialy from one individual to another. certain if partial detachment hment of the retina is what's causing your short sightedness, then it's an issue, if it's that you have a genetic problem with lense thickness it's hard to see how that a risk . I think a visit to an expert is required if your concerned or do something were you dont get puched r in the face a lot, which is a wise move for all sort of reasons besides not detaching you retina
 

Yokozuna514

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if you practise with iut correction, then you signal processing will improve to compensate, if you practise in glasses and remove/ loose them in a fight you will really struggle to process the information as you depth perception will be all wrong and things will move to one side or the other or up or down or all of these
It sounds to me as if you are saying that it is better to practice without correction than with glasses. Although, I would tend to agree with this statement I would add that is is better to have eye surgery like Lasik or to wear contacts (least favourite option) than to practice without correction at all if you are in a striking art. I am sure that you would agree that the ability to block successfully is contingent on being able to see the strike. If eyesight is poor at arms length distance not having some form of correction is going to make blocking more challenging than it has to be. If eyesight still allows you to see motion (but not clear vision) this can also be used against you in the form of fakes.

As a last resort you may be able to get by in a SD scenario but to spar over a long period of time without some form of vision correction is going to make practicing suck.
 

jobo

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It sounds to me as if you are saying that it is better to practice without correction than with glasses. Although, I would tend to agree with this statement I would add that is is better to have eye surgery like Lasik or to wear contacts (least favourite option) than to practice without correction at all if you are in a striking art. I am sure that you would agree that the ability to block successfully is contingent on being able to see the strike. If eyesight is poor at arms length distance not having some form of correction is going to make blocking more challenging than it has to be. If eyesight still allows you to see motion (but not clear vision) this can also be used against you in the form of fakes.

As a last resort you may be able to get by in a SD scenario but to spar over a long period of time without some form of vision correction is going to make practicing suck.
well not all conditions are operable and non essential surgery isn't a wise chose anyway. contact dont suit all people, I can't wear them until they invent vari focal contacts. , , or I have to wear reading glasses, which rather defeats the object.

but essentially what I'm saying is if you wear glasses out and about and lots of people do, then if you take you glasses of for a fight or lose them I the Malay, then your stuffed as far as judging speed, distance and exact trajectory. youl do far better if you've trained with out them, what you see may be a bit blurry, but at least it's where your brain tells you it is. a blurry punch is no harder to avoid than a focust one, provided that you sight does pre lude you from see three foot at all. or you have tunnel vision, it may even improve your vision as you concentrating on focusing the eye, theres a whole school of though that a lot of myopia, is caused by people in cities never trying to focus on anything more than 10 foot away, or nowadays more than 10 inches away. certainly once you start wearing glasses you going to get worse and worse as you work the eye less and less
 
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Yokozuna514

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well not all conditions are operable and non essential surgery isn't a wise chose anyway. contact dont suit all people, I can't wear them until they invent vari focal contacts. , , or I have to wear reading glasses, which rather defeats the object.

but essentially what I'm saying is if you wear glasses out and about and lots of people do, then if you take you glasses of for a fight or lose them I the Malay, then your stuffed as far as judging speed, distance and exact trajectory. youl do far better if you've trained with out them, what you see may be a bit blurry, but at least it's where your brain tells you it is. a blurry punch is no harder to avoid than a focust one, provided that you sight does pre lude you from see three foot at all. or you have tunnel vision, it may even improve your vision as you concentrating on focusing the eye
Agreed, not all conditions are operable. I am not sure I agree with non-essential eye surgery not being a wise choice. I won't go into all the different non-essential eye surgeries that when done can improve your standard of living but certainly Lasik corrective eye surgery improves long distance vision and I am sure the people that have had it done feel as if it was a wise choice.

Also not sure I agree with the follow up paragraph, ".....far better if you've trained without them....at least it's where your brain tells you it is.". It is not fun nor productive to train when you cannot see properly. Especially when your peripheral vision is blurry, it is not easy to react properly to strikes coming from the outside the clear field of vision. If you are in a SD situation and had no choice, then you will react to what you see. Will the you be more successful because you train under these conditions, I don't think so. The tendency to train within your scope of your vision is probably stronger than the ability to train outside of your scope. If that was not true why wouldn't everyone train with reduced scope of vision if there is little or no effect on performance. The field of vision is important and the the greater the field the better the ability to react, plain and simple.

I am also not certain about what you mean '..... improve your vision as you concentrating on focusing the eye'. Perhaps, in a SD situation this is a good way to cope without the use of glasses or contacts but I think it is the least effective way to deal with nearsightedness when it comes to using a striking art. I would always suggest to find the best way and most feasible way to correct your vision as it will enhance your experience and your performance in most cases.
 

jobo

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Agreed, not all conditions are operable. I am not sure I agree with non-essential eye surgery not being a wise choice. I won't go into all the different non-essential eye surgeries that when done can improve your standard of living but certainly Lasik corrective eye surgery improves long distance vision and I am sure the people that have had it done feel as if it was a wise choice.

Also not sure I agree with the follow up paragraph, ".....far better if you've trained without them....at least it's where your brain tells you it is.". It is not fun nor productive to train when you cannot see properly. Especially when your peripheral vision is blurry, it is not easy to react properly to strikes coming from the outside the clear field of vision. If you are in a SD situation and had no choice, then you will react to what you see. Will the you be more successful because you train under these conditions, I don't think so. The tendency to train within your scope of your vision is probably stronger than the ability to train outside of your scope. If that was not true why wouldn't everyone train with reduced scope of vision if there is little or no effect on performance. The field of vision is important and the the greater the field the better the ability to react, plain and simple.

I am also not certain about what you mean '..... improve your vision as you concentrating on focusing the eye'. Perhaps, in a SD situation this is a good way to cope without the use of glasses or contacts but I think it is the least effective way to deal with nearsightedness when it comes to using a striking art. I would always suggest to find the best way and most feasible way to correct your vision as it will enhance your experience and your performance in most cases.
well it's all situation where someone is trying to punch you in the face, but most certainly sd were any sane person will remove their glasses before some one removes them for them , it may suck until your brain corrects its self, but that the point, it will correct its self, it's clearly depends on how bad your eye sight is picking up objects traveling at speed for 50 yards away is a problem, picking up a blurry punch from three foot away should not be, l get your self a dart broard , take you glasses of, and in a short time it will make little difference to your accuracy or throw a ball against a wall and catch, you be surprised how quickly you learn to compensate

the eye is like any other muscle, if you dont work it, by forcing it to focus it will deteriorate, consequently, there a good chance to improve it if you do, with in certain bounds obviously
 

Yokozuna514

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well it's all situation where someone is trying to punch you in the face, but most certainly sd were any sane person will remove their glasses before some one removes them for them , it may suck until your brain corrects its self, but that the point, it will correct its self, it's clearly depends on how bad your eye sight is picking up objects traveling at speed for 50 yards away is a problem, picking up a blurry punch from three foot away should not be, l get your self a dart broard , take you glasses of, and in a short time it will make little difference to your accuracy or throw a ball against a wall and catch, you be surprised how quickly you learn to compensate

the eye is like any other muscle, if you dont work it, by forcing it to focus it will deteriorate, consequently, there a good chance to improve it if you do, with in certain bounds obviously
I think I can agree with you when you say your brain will compensate for eyesight in a SD situation. Amazing things can happen when the fight or flight response is triggered. However, I am not sue the suggestion of practicing on a dart board without your glasses will translate the same way (or reasonable way) as getting corrective eye surgery that will assist in enhancing your 'field of vision' as opposed to the the specific focus of your vision. Perhaps if the training only consisted of straight shots that were starting from a point of vision that you saw clearly but most training scenarios involve having to see strikes coming from all angles so the bigger and clearer the 'field of vision' the better. I am really not certain that the brain can compensate for that. That is pretty much all I am saying.

I do get that you can concentrate on focusing your eyes so that the image is sharper but I am not sure this is better than having the surgery or wearing corrective lenses.
 

Leviathan

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it doesn't really say that, it does say that severe myopia is a risk factor, that in excess of - 6 , but it's not at all clearly that myopia less than this is a problem or even why severe myopia is an issue, as the actual causes of my opiate are not clearly understood and vary substanialy from one individual to another. certain if partial detachment hment of the retina is what's causing your short sightedness, then it's an issue, if it's that you have a genetic problem with lense thickness it's hard to see how that a risk . I think a visit to an expert is required if your concerned or do something were you dont get puched r in the face a lot, which is a wise move for all sort of reasons besides not detaching you retina

I am quoting Wikipedia, risk factors:

Posterior vitreous detachment, injury to the eye, inflammation of the eye, short sighted, previous cataractsurgery[1]


So yes, it says nearsightedness is a risk factor.

Why is it so? A nearsighted eye has an enlarged eyeball and as it seems not all parts grow in exactly the same proportions. Excessive growth of the eyeball can somehow "tear it apart". Ok that's exaggerated rhetoric to try to give you a picture.

Nearsightedness is associated with quite a few complications (glaucoma, cataract, intraoccular pressure etc.). Retinal detachment is not the single complication that could - rarely - occur.

The risk of a retinal detachment is present in other sports, especially tennis or squash because the small ball can badly hurt your eye if it lands on it. Unlikely but possible.
 

jobo

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I am quoting Wikipedia, risk factors:

Posterior vitreous detachment, injury to the eye, inflammation of the eye, short sighted, previous cataractsurgery[1]


So yes, it says nearsightedness is a risk factor.

Why is it so? A nearsighted eye has an enlarged eyeball and as it seems not all parts grow in exactly the same proportions. Excessive growth of the eyeball can somehow "tear it apart". Ok that's exaggerated rhetoric to try to give you a picture.

Nearsightedness is associated with quite a few complications (glaucoma, cataract, intraoccular pressure etc.). Retinal detachment is not the single complication that could - rarely - occur.

The risk of a retinal detachment is present in other sports, especially tennis or squash because the small ball can badly hurt your eye if it lands on it. Unlikely but possible.
no its says severe myopia is a risk factor if you bother to read the text, and not all short sighted ness is caused by the thing you describe, diagnosing your condition using wiki media is not a wise thing to do

I got hit in the face with a football and went blind for two weeks, completly blind
 
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