Two teachers or just one?

SapphireStar

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Would it cause more problems for me to work with two different teachers?

I'm willing and want to work my hind end off, going 4x week to classes. Only problem is, due to schedules and one teacher under a "no compete" contract, I can only go once or twice a week with either one or the other.

Am I going to create more confusion for myself? They both teach the same thing. Does anyone think it's possible to split my time and successfully learn and work well with 2 teachers? Thanks for anyone's ideas.
 

Emma

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I train with two different instructors, as I can't make it every week to class on the same day due to work. I find they teach very similar material, but that is mostly due to the fact that one is the other ones instructor as well. Having said that, they do some things differently, so I can try a technique both ways, and decide which one works best for me.:)
 

Hand Sword

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Coming off a semester where 1 of the classes was taught by 2 professors, 1 every other class. It was excruciating! 2 different people, even with the same subject differ in little details. And it is the little nuances that make things and relationships what they are. If just beginning, I would recommend picking just 1 instructor. Take your time. No need to rush things. It will all come in time. One of the most difficult things to do is restrain the desire and energy when undertaking a new and exciting activity. You just want to absorb it ALL at once.
That's a great thing! Piece by piece. Step by step! Good luck!
 

Tez3

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Are they the same school or two different ones? You mentioned a 'no compete' contract which makes me think they are two different schools?
 

Laus

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Its hard to say without knowing more about your situation. Are these two instructors in the same school, teaching the same art or different ones? How far along are you in your training?

If they are teaching in two different schools but are teaching the same style, then I would say no. Every instructor has their own peculiarities about how they want things done so you'll likely end up satisfying neither of them, and while its not really about them, you probably won't get quality instruction if you tick them off.

If they are teaching in the same school, I am not sure how that would be a violation of your no-compete clause. I suppose it would depend if one is working under the direction of the other or if they just happen to share a space.

If it were two totally different arts, I'd say go ahead, assuming you already have a solid foundation in one so as to avoid confusion. There is still the problem of your instructor - if he/she does not approve you will only be creating problems for yourself.

At any rate the first thing I would do is to to talk to your current instructor. Depending on his relationship to the other and how far into your training you are he may or may not approve, but you need to know that before you can proceed.
 

Bruno@MT

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Are they teaching similar things?
If so, I am going to argue that if they go about teaching their stuff in different ways, with technical variations as well, you're better off with just one. Otherwise what you will learn will be neither one or the other, but a mix. Depending on what that is, it will not help you in the long run.

In traditional Japanese systems, it is not done to study the same art under a different teacher if that teacher belongs to a different organization or different independent branch. For example I am a Genbukan student. I could train in any of our Genbukan schools (assuming both my sensei and the other one agree) or even move to Japan for a while and study in hombu dojo under Tanemura soke. But under no circumstance am I allowed to formally study in e.g. a Bujinkan dojo.

Studying a different art is not a problem, though as a courtesy you are supposed to discuss this with your sensei first so that he knows. Even Tanemura soke himself still studies under another sensei.
 

Stac3y

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I train under multiple instructors in the same school using the same curriculum. It can be frustrating due to differing details, but can also sometimes be very helpful--if I'm not getting something the way one instructor teaches it, one of the others may have an explanation that works for me. YMMV.
 
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SapphireStar

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Thanks, everyone, for great opinions.

Long story short - teacher has his own school, but gives introductory classes currently at a wellness spa. Therein lies the no-compete contract. I love this teacher, but am limited to what I can learn at the spa; i.e. no other people to practice with, can't progress much here beyond beginner - which I did not know at the start. That's why I wanted both places - spa and school. But, it's a no go from the spa owners. :angry: :tantrum:

Then I thought I'd go to a completely different school and keep the classes at the spa until teacher's contract there expires, then go up to his school. Not sure if there's a time frame of no contact after the contract or what. Am going to discuss with teacher and make a decision after that. :confused:

After seeing the opinions here, I think it's best I work with just one teacher and one facility; due to the differences in techniques and more so the respect factor. That's going to be the hard part, deciding which one to work with. :idunno:

I've got an awful lot to learn yet... about everything :duh:


ADDENDUM: Briefly want to clarify that teacher was not trying to poach me away from the spa for his own school. It just came up in conversation after I mentioned how much I love the class and want to learn more. I hate to admit, wasnt exactly professional of him to mention it, but he was only trying to help a student who wanted more.
 
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Newbie

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I would say at the very beginning, just use the one instructor for one art and trust him/her enough to guide you to do things there way...if you feel this isn't working and someone elses instruction is better then by all means change, but starting out in an art getting instruction from two different schools could be confusing.

By all means once you are at a higher standard, then there's nothing wrong with branching out and adding what others may have to offer too.

As for training under different instructors for different arts, i think it's a good thing, it's good not to stay in your comfort zone and see how other people do things.

Back to your question though, if you are just starting out in something i would find whichever one it is you are most comfortable with and stick with it
 

shane

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I think it depend upon the situation that how you can get from the tow or one teacher..
 

xfighter88

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Just realize you are the consumer. If the full service dojo will help you improve more than the part time dojo at the spa don't sweat it. No sense spending money on an inferior product out of respect.

P.S. I am not saying that the spa guy is an inferior instructor just that where he is selling his product constrains your potential as a student.
 

Kenpo17

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It all depends on the school and the instructors. I have had up to four instructors at once, and I have had up to six instructors work along with me. The curriculum they all teach is the same and is set by the school itself not the individual instructor (or should be). Now, with each instructor, they may add or delete manouvers from what you were originally taught, but as for the overall curriculum you should have no problems.
 

tayl0124

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Stick with one teacher and work your *** off. Remember you don't have to have a teacher in front of you to tell you what you are doing. Practice your basics until you feel like passing out. Basics will really make or break your karate.
 
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