Train with your dog?

Hmm. He was extremely obedient and attentive, but very intimidating at times. Great with cats, kids, and women, but you could not enter my house with hat or sunglasses on if you wanted to remain intact.
I would be very uncomfortable having anything in my house, capable of maiming/killing with me with which I couldnt reason with and without a well developed moral compass and was prone to instinctive violent behaviour...animal or human!
 
So I cant come for tea?
Are you reasonable? Do you have a well developed moral compass (Confucianism is my favoured framework but Ill take most of them)? Are you peaceful?

If you answer yes to all those questions, you are welcome for tea - bring biscuits圩or dunking.
 
I would be very uncomfortable having anything in my house, capable of maiming/killing with me with which I couldnt reason with and without a well developed moral compass and was prone to instinctive violent behaviour...animal or human!
Gyakato, I trust my dog. If you are a "dog person" you can find a breed to suit your needs or wants. Every dog will have it's personality and that's driven by training especially at the early ages.
I don't know you personally, so I won't even suggest you have a dog. I do suggest that everyone who could possibly have a dog in their life do so.
 
Are you reasonable? Do you have a well developed moral compass (Confucianism is my favoured framework but Ill take most of them)? Are you peaceful?

If you answer yes to all those questions, you are welcome for tea - bring biscuits圩or dunking.
Im pleading the fifth on at least two of those. I have three biscuits, because I saved them from when I was a good dog.
 
Dogs. They rock. They just do.
 
Does anyone train with your dog? My 10 month old wants to involve himself in my training. I'm thinking of working him into my routine.
Does anyone do this? Does it help? I'm new at Karate and the dog is a pup so we can learn together. Am I nuts?
When I've had young, playful dogs, I've used their playfulness to train hand speed, cover, footwork, framing (with larger dogs), ground movement (kneeling or moving on/from the back). Their sheer determination and agility (and willingness to slap me with their paws) makes a decent exercise out of something that's far more fun than most training drills.

I never tried to teach the dog a MA - just let them learn to play fight better, along with me. I worked on specific principles and variations (using grip escape movements to control the dog's head without gripping, for instance).
 
When I've had young, playful dogs, I've used their playfulness to train hand speed, cover, footwork, framing (with larger dogs), ground movement (kneeling or moving on/from the back). Their sheer determination and agility (and willingness to slap me with their paws) makes a decent exercise out of something that's far more fun than most training drills.

I never tried to teach the dog a MA - just let them learn to play fight better, along with me. I worked on specific principles and variations (using grip escape movements to control the dog's head without gripping, for instance).
I had a big red pit bull named Puck when I was in my late 20s. He was a serious dog that was extremely obedient but very intimidating when meeting men. My training brother Jason was Pucks best friend. After training my training brothers would come to my house for group dinner, Puck and Jason would go into the back yard and spar full contact. Jason punching and Puck attacking him. Jason would be bleeding and have ripped clothes Puck would have some lumps but both loved it. Nobody else could or would do that with Puck, but they had a special bond.
 
I had a big red pit bull named Puck when I was in my late 20s. He was a serious dog that was extremely obedient but very intimidating when meeting men. My training brother Jason was Pucks best friend. After training my training brothers would come to my house for group dinner, Puck and Jason would go into the back yard and spar full contact. Jason punching and Puck attacking him. Jason would be bleeding and have ripped clothes Puck would have some lumps but both loved it. Nobody else could or would do that with Puck, but they had a special bond.
Some dogs just love rough play. They're idiots. Like the kind of people who do martial arts.
 
Some dogs just love rough play. They're idiots. Like the kind of people who do martial arts.
I had a dog that used to love running and then ramming into family members at full speed. It was something she developed on her own. Not sure why she liked tackling us like that, but that was her thing. She loved the pool so if I was in it, I could expect her to jump on my head if I gave her the opportunity. She was a mid size dog so no biggie beyond her claws.

She liked to play rough, but it was never at the level of drawing blood. Very smart dog great climber of things, but extremely territorial. She didn't give an inch to anyone who wasn't a member of the house. She was the type of dog that had to be locked up when visitors came.

That eventually got out of hand. She was no problem for the family but we couldn't train that territory issue that she had and always worried if she was going to bite someone out of the blue because she sees fit to.

Not my dog but she looked like this one. My son was about 5 or 6 years old which meant his friends were on her menu, she only liked one of my sons friends. The rest were like how dogs can detect demons, and she could not stand anything about them. I just couldn't risk a law suit if she decided to try to take a chunk out of someone's kids. But back to your statement. Yeah some dogs like to rough house and sometimes they will be jerks about it.

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We have two Great Pyrenees, both turned 1 this month, plus a Border/Pyr who is 8, a 4 year old Cairn Terrier, and a cat. I play with them all a lot, but I do not train with them. Were I to spar with the Pyrenees, I'd probably lose. The small one is about 130 pounds. The Polar Bear is about 150.
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Update. Weighed them. Cooper, the small one, is 148 pounds. Bailey is 194.
 
I am not a dog person.
Get a greyhound, they are only part dog, the rest is cat and horse. Everything from their physiology to their behaviour is different from other dogs. They won't guard your house or you, they will sleep for 20 hours a day, don't smell because of low body fat and thin coat. When they run they literally fly, the only animal who can run faster and has the same gait is the cheetah. They will make you laugh and cheer you up when you are low. Their hearts are bigger than other dogs, literally and figuratively.

To everyone, please don't support greyhound racing, so many dogs suffer and did so people can bet. Rescue a greyhound and you'll never regret it
 
Get a greyhound, they are only part dog, the rest is cat and horse. Everything from their physiology to their behaviour is different from other dogs. They won't guard your house or you, they will sleep for 20 hours a day, don't smell because of low body fat and thin coat. When they run they literally fly, the only animal who can run faster and has the same gait is the cheetah. They will make you laugh and cheer you up when you are low. Their hearts are bigger than other dogs, literally and figuratively.

To everyone, please don't support greyhound racing, so many dogs suffer and did so people can bet. Rescue a greyhound and you'll never regret it
All this is true! You can adopt a 2-3 year old retired racer that will be a sweet 50 mph couch potatoe. They are generally very shy and never bark. Sweet and gentle even after trauma from racing.
 
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