Three concepts on the utilization of forces

gpseymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
25,951
Reaction score
7,639
Location
Hendersonville, NC
Actually their are about half-a-dozen ways to "borrow" your opponent's force in the striking art of Wing Chun.

1. Collision Principle: slip or deflect the incoming punch with your counterpunch so your opponent's forward momentum adds his force to yours as he collides with your fist.
2. Pivot Principle: You receive the incoming force with one arm pivoting with the force and return it simultaneously punching with the other arm, as in tan-da sau with a turn.
3. Rebound Principle: You parry, rebounding off the incoming strike borrowing its power to bounce directly into a counterstrike, as in pak-da or pak-sau to fak sau.
4. Borrowed Response: You jerk down on an opponent's arm and they resist, lifting your arm up adding power to your strike to a high target as in jut-da punching the face.
5. Augmentation Principle: They punch, you deflect and pull, augmenting their force with yours, leading them into a throw, or pulling them into a wall, post or other hard object!
6. Spring Principle: They charge in, with their force bending and compressing your limbs, so when released your arms snap back like bent bamboo, adding their force to your own as in bong-sau to fak-sau. This springy energy is at the core of the WT lineage I trained. It is how we understand the old kuen kuit: Loi lau hoi sung, lat sau jik chung.

BTW these ideas are my own breakdown of what I learned from LT back in the early 80s and put into an article I wrote for Inside Kung-Fu at that time. Golly, remember when people read magazines? :D
Just an aside, #5 is nearly identical to how I teach working with over-extension to lead an attacker into a throw/takedown.
 

Transk53

The Dark Often Prevails
Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2013
Messages
4,220
Reaction score
835
Location
England 43 Anno Domini
Isn't that what I just said?

I can get away with using dead force (inefficient exertion) if I have enough strength advantage to overcome their skill. But there are more efficient ways to use that strength.

Agree. I am lucky enough to be very strong and take quite a bit to body. IE, if they slammed in to me. But yes not so efficient, or wise on many levels.
 

Latest Discussions

Top