The use of Gray's Anatomy

Brother John

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How many of you have made a real study of anatomy and it's implications into your practice/use of Kenpo???
Just wondering...
Your Brother
John
 
I do, though I usually have to get help from friends. I keep pestering my parents (dads a doctor, moms a PT) for clarification on where muscles attach, or how the nerves connect that aren't well shown in Grays. Two of my fellow instructors are nurses as well, one of which has done alot more exploration of anatomy than I have.

I've been mostly working on the arms and head so far, I haven't explored the torso and legs as much. My copy of Gray's Anatomy has little post-its on the pages for reference.

Lamont
 
Originally posted by Brother John

How many of you have made a real study of anatomy and it's implications into your practice/use of Kenpo???
Just wondering...
Your Brother
John

Mr. Duffy used to use a Gray's Anatomy Coloring Book as a teaching aid. It is of course very well illustrated.

I keep meaning to get one. His is very old, and that last time I looked at one for me it was like $30.00. I may ask for one for Christmas though now that you have reminded me.
 
The three resources I normally use are a 33 pg book called Human Anatomy in Full Color by John Green, The Anatomy Coloring Book by Kapit & Elson and a 2 video set I picked up at Sigung LaBounty's suggestion called The Video Atlas of the Human Anatomy.

I like the Anatomy coloring book because it tells you about the natural movement of the body and certain issues that joints may face. The Video Atlas is the weirdest thing I had ever seen. The dude was explaining the shoulder area and the ligaments and muscles,etc.....So I'm watching him use this dummy and then I'm like wait a minute that's not a dummy that is an actual part (I should say cross section) of an arm and shoulder...it is very graphic in explaining and SHOWING the muscles, joints, sockets, etc....if you have the stomach for it, it is an education. I found it on some obscure used college text reseller on the internet for cheap.

jb:asian:
 
... takes on a whole new meaning when you are talking about learning anatomy, eh? I started with NCKKA material, material in other Martial Arts books, and actual pressure point / medical anatomy charts. Then got the coloring book before Brown Belt, circa 1982-1983 and for Black actually got a Grey's Anatomy.

More than I can ever learn, or rather, more than I am willing to spend the time learning. Alas, I lost Grey's in a divorce in 1993 and have been unwilling to cough up the $$$'s to purchase a new one. I still highly recommend it as the definitive reference source.

I require my students to at least have a "working knowledge of applied kinesiology as referenced in Infinite Insights.

-Michael
UKS-Texas
 
The Video Atlas is the weirdest thing I had ever seen. The dude was explaining the shoulder area and the ligaments and muscles,etc.....So I'm watching him use this dummy and then I'm like wait a minute that's not a dummy that is an actual part (I should say cross section) of an arm and shoulder...it is very graphic in explaining and SHOWING the muscles, joints, sockets, etc....if you have the stomach for it, it is an education.

Heh, I remember when my mom was in PT school (I was about 10 or so), and she brought home a cadaver arm to do homework. Both really cool and disgusting at the same time.

Mr. Billings,

You can pick up Grays at B&N or Amazon for under 20 bucks, a good investment, or an expensive paperweight depending on how you look at it. :)

Lamont
 
After most kenpo lessons, I'd head home and check out the Anatomy Coloring Book to learn a little more about the targeting of strikes. I've also found some lecture notes on biomechanics (specifically, the lever actions of major bones and muscles) helpful when looking at joint locks, arm bars, and hyperextensions.

Using the reference books definitely adds another dimension to the kenpo learning curve....

Tad
 
Brother John,

Most Excellent topic!!


After studying the Martial Arts (although I'm a Kenpo newbie) for quite a while the subject of anatomy becomes more necessary.

I have Grays on the "short list" of my birthday presents to add to my reference library, along with a just a few Mosby manuals, and American Red Cross books.


and not only from the lethality applications ..............


The ability to have knowledge of anatomy also allows to assist a fellow martial artist (+ family, friends, and GASP... even stangers!) who may become injured in your presence.


Healing is more significant than hurting for the well balanced Martial Artist.

:asian:
 
You need use the anatomy knowledge together with physics, i.e. the knowledge of the juncture alone is not enough to throw someone, you must know how to apply the momentum (sorry, english is not my mother tongue and I don't know how to explain this)
 
Dang!

Its not bad enough Seig lies down and goes to sleep while I'm instructing, now he's beating on the kinder, genteler Stick Dummy for "Caring & Sharing"

I got the Grays anatomy book for my B-day, and just have to get the coloring book too. Be fun to track this stuff on my Century "Bob" dummy.

Why physics to throw somebody in Kenpo?

If this sounds stupid sorry,
it is not meant to be a flame,

I've had this limb destruction thing going for a couple years now that I just can't kick..........
 
To know for example how to apply properly a leverage.
To know why the back up mass works, action-reaction principle. To know the principle of the conservation of movement, thus putting that to work to your advantage.
But unless you think anatomy is only necessary to know pressure points, in which a small pressure gets a lot of response, there's a lot of physics involved in martial arts as well
 
Originally posted by Kenpomachine

You need use the anatomy knowledge together with physics, i.e. the knowledge of the juncture alone is not enough to throw someone, you must know how to apply the momentum (sorry, english is not my mother tongue and I don't know how to explain this)


My friend,

Your English is very good, no need to apologise for it.

Les

PS
Good to see another European kenpo exponent on the forum, welcome
 
Thanks for the welcome, Les :)

I knew your patch remind me of something and DANG, one of the fomer students of my instructor is the representative for the AKKI in Spain, David P矇rez de Lara. Great guy :)
 
Originally posted by Kenpomachine

Thanks for the welcome, Les :)

I knew your patch remind me of something and DANG, one of the fomer students of my instructor is the representative for the AKKI in Spain, David P矇rez de Lara. Great guy :)


It sure is a small world.

Where abouts in Spain are you?

My parents live in Gran Canaria.

Les
 
I'm from Madrid, though I'd rather be in the Canarias now ;)

Luc穩a
 
We keep a skeleton with rubberbands representing nerves, to show location of nerve strikes. We also, like in jujitsu, do fall and throw training for throwing techniques. We have also recently added a joint lock (2) person kata to practice obtaining and transitioning differant holds and joint locks. We do 14 differant joint locks on each side ending in a throw. If you would like to see the Joint Lock Kata it is on Joe Simonet's Beyond Kenpo tapes. Excellent tapes by the way.
 

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