strength vs technique

Thor, the Mighty.

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hello all,

I posted this thread elsewhere too but was wondering what you guys thought of it, (being of an aikido background myself, i thought i would greatly appreciate you input).

The question is do you think strength will always win over technique or vice versa?

thanks for reading folks.
 

Jenna

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Helloooo :) Me, I think it would be difficult to argue here in the absolute sense. I think in general terms that while inadequate strength will be overcome by superior technique, inadequate technique will also be overcome by superior strength.

I would suggest that the key is to equip ourselves with both technique and the strength to specifically apply that technique. I think it is important that we equip ourselves with both but that we do so in the correct proportion [technique being naturally more important].

I do not believe there is any martial art that wins out solely through strength; technique is imperative for the strength in the in the strike / kick / throw / lock to be applied correctly, yes?

And but I think often in Aikido we can assume that technique will succeed regardless, whereas even a precisely applied Aikido technique cannot be applied without a measure of strength [no matter how little] to project our energy. I hope you would agree?

I have heard it repeatedly suggested that Aikido is different from other MA because it is entirely unreliant upon strength.. I think that is not an entirely informed viewpoint though I can understand how it is easy to arrive at that conclusion based [as I have heard and read] upon Youtubes of amazingly proficient old geezers with beards. I might suggest that those old geezers perhaps apply their own strength much more efficiently through techniques that have disavowed the extraneous and begin to approach a kind of technical purity ...Or maybe they just employ highly acrobatic ukes.. I am not exactly certain :D Either way, I like those old geezers on Youtube.. Morehei whatshisface and that other guy who I've forgot haha..

I would say that technique is of primary importance and but a measure of strength [in proportion to the practitioner] is requisite. I would suggest further that the same idea applies in all MA and fighting sports.

Janna x
 

theletch1

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Jenna has, once again, taken the words nearly out of my own mouth. Instead of lecturing here for the next page and a half on the subject I'll just suggest that you do a search in the aikido forum using the word "strength" and check out many of the threads on the subject. It'll give you an aikido specific view the topic.
 

K-man

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The problem of relying on strength is, there is always going to be someone bigger, faster and stronger than us, and although I don't think of myself as an old geezer, I do rely more on my brain than my muscles. Ultimately technique is the essential and the strength becomes much less important.
 

David43515

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Simple answer: It depends. Fights are too chaotic for an "A-always-beats-B" answer.

My own answer: I`ve always been lucky in that I`m a big guy, and strength and weight have been a deffinate advantage for years. But I`m 44 this year. I`m not as strong (or as flexable) as I was 10 years ago and it`s tough just to maintain, let alone improve on my strength. I learned from teachers that weren`t big guys, and I`m glad I did because they HAD to have good technique to make it work on big guys. That`s helped me learn to use technique to neutralize the strength of opponants, so I don`t have to use strength to win.

IMO, there ain`t no magic bullet. Being strong helps and it`s always important, but it`s not the answer to every problem. Good technique is ALWAYS important, but some techniques don`t work if you`re not strong enough to do them correctly. You gotta train both, there`s no way around it.

Now you have my sage advice. That and $2.50 will get you a cup of coffee.
 

tempus

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I always try for the best technique I can; However, when I mess up I do rely on some strength to fix my mistakes. Most of my fixes usually are solid strikes to a vital point to start some energy. If I am grappling, which I am bad at, I rely on a lot more strength. With all things being equal, in my opinion, strength should win. For example, early in my training a smaller guy, about 40 lbs lighter then me, tried to throw me in a leg sweep after I tried to hit him, and he messed up. Now both of us were planted back to back in a leg sweep position, and with no energy. He tried to sweep me using strength and unfortunatly blew out his ACL.

Now I do strength train regularly, just got a hold of a tractor tire, but I am turning 40 and things may start to change strength wise in the coming year. The reason I took Aikido in the first place is that when I am in my very later years I am going to have to rely on something more then strength. Hence the never ending training for perfection in technique.

-Gary
 

dancingalone

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Strength undoubtedly helps although most sensei will frown on you being too 'stiff' and hard in practice since they want you to develop your sensitivity and refine your technique.
 

Manny

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Nice question, I am a big guy so my physical strenght has helped me a lot inside the dojo/dojang, mostly when we do close quarters combat, however I know that against a person with the same level of strength than I have or larger I will have to rely in technique too.

I remeber one time when doing some kind of wrestling (shyrum) in dojang with a smaller kid, this kid is a fierce one and always try to catch me offguard and some times I help him to fight me cause I want him to learn how to defend himself from a big guy, well returning to my point.. I let this kid to take me to the ground and let him pin me in the ground and ofered little resistence but when I wanted to stand up this little fellow did not allow me, he just pined me well on the ground, no matter how I tried to get up I couldn't so I pinch a nerve with my free hand, that was the only way to get free of this little fellow.

My friend told me it wasn't fair, I told him in the streets there is not such thing and that he needs to be prepared for wath ever, so I taught him some presure points.

Some times it's not necesary so much force but a clean tecnique, so I think thechnique is the best way to go.

Manny
 

5rings

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I remember years ago my sensei saying that the beginner students where always dangerous to work with because they used too much strength and didn't fully understand the techniques. I remember this was very much so when doing rondori, working with them was like trying to teach a bear how to dance. But some of the students where rather big and if their movement was stopped cold......strength was always a defining factor, I think the idea was to use their strength against them, to connect to the attack and extend your own ki.
 

5rings

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Strength undoubtedly helps although most sensei will frown on you being too 'stiff' and hard in practice since they want you to develop your sensitivity and refine your technique.
Yes more about connection, extending ki & grounding...than strength alone. Some style's of Wu Shu do the samething but "Aikido" is in a complete class by it self.
Always try to think outside the Taditional Box.
 

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