Starting Martial Arts After 50

gpseymour

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Agree. That is simple math that all the weight loss programs out their try to persuade you otherwise. I do believe some people burn calories easier/quicker than others for reasons I wish I knew the answer to. I would be a zillionaire.
There's some good evidence that we also absorb them at different rates. Something I read recently shed light on two instances:
  1. Pre-cooked, cooled, then reheated pasta and bread apparently deliver fewer calories to the body than fresh does. Something about how the structure changes (amino acids, I think, but that may be me mis-remembering) in the cooling process.
  2. Gut flora seems to also have a significant impact on what we process/absorb from foods.
And then we add in the fact that fat cells produce hormones (I think it was a hormone...might be a different biochemical) that encourage the body to store calories as fat. So calories in vs. calories out is entirely valid, but there are so many factors involved that any two people following exactly the same regimen (both food and activity) are likely to get different results - sometimes dramatically different.
 

jobo

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Agree. That is simple math that all the weight loss programs out their try to persuade you otherwise. I do believe some people burn calories easier/quicker than others for reasons I wish I knew the answer to. I would be a zillionaire.
uts easy to cure obesity, just have a famine and a petrol shortage. or move to sub Saharan Africa and live on 5 dollars a day, that will sort it out, or just live on that much where you are now

if you look at the countries that have obesity problems of which the USA is by far the worse youl see there a strong correlation between how ritch the country is and how many fat people there are. after the USA, then it's the g7 biggest economies that quickly follow. it's a toss up if it's an abundance of food or car ownership, prob3bl6 a bit of both

people are literally being killed by wealth
 

gpseymour

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uts easy to cure obesity, just have a famine and a petrol shortage. or move to sub Saharan Africa and live on 5 dollars a day, that will sort it out, or just live on that much where you are now

if you look at the countries that have obesity problems of which the USA is by far the worse youl see there a strong correlation between how ritch the country is and how many fat people there are. after the USA, then it's the g7 biggest economies that quickly follow. it's a toss up if it's an abundance of food or car ownership, prob3bl6 a bit of both

people are literally being killed by wealth
You're close, but off by a bit. In wealthy countries - especially the US - the cheapest foods are more processes, generally higher in fat and salt. So obesity in the US is generally higher among those in the lower income brackets, because they have trouble affording the more healthful foods. Obviously, that's not accurate in all cases, but in some areas it's almost impossible to get good food. They're referred to as "food deserts", where there's maybe a couple of convenience stores (not selling fresh produce or much of healthy food at all) within reach.
 

jobo

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You're close, but off by a bit. In wealthy countries - especially the US - the cheapest foods are more processes, generally higher in fat and salt. So obesity in the US is generally higher among those in the lower income brackets, because they have trouble affording the more healthful foods. Obviously, that's not accurate in all cases, but in some areas it's almost impossible to get good food. They're referred to as "food deserts", where there's maybe a couple of convenience stores (not selling fresh produce or much of healthy food at all) within reach.
we've had this discussion before, the people in food deserts will get fit walking to the supper market to buy fresh food, , and as a general rule the more nutritious a foood the cheaper it is to buy, but the longer the preparation .

you can live quite well on mostly chick peas, in fact I great big % of the world do just that, and their really cheap. but then so is cabbage and rice and mutton and home made veg soup with a bit of mutton in it.

and when I was last there a decade ago, there was a significant amount of over weight middle class people in nice cars,
 
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JR 137

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we've had this discussion before, the people in food deserts will get fit walking to the supper market to buy fresh food, , and as a general rule the more nutritious a foood the cheaper it is to buy, but the longer the preparation .

you can live quite well on mostly chick peas, in fact I great big % of the world do just that, and their really cheap. but then so is cabbage and rice and mutton and home made veg soup with a bit of mutton in it.

and when I was last there a decade ago, there was a significant amount of over weight middle class people in nice cars,
The US is the exception to the “the healthier it is, the cheaper to buy” rule. I remember seeing a video that said this (and many other things) in my sports nutrition class in grad school a while back. In practically every country, a meal made from scratch is far cheaper than a processed and boxed up meal; in the US, crappy frozen food isle stuff is cheaper.

Then add the convenience factor. Many families here have 2 full-time working parents. It’s easier to serve something quick when you’ve gotten home at 6 from a long day at work and have to feed a family of 5 or 6. And it’s cheaper.

Being rich isn’t making us as fat as you think, although it has something to do with it. Being frugal and convenient is a far bigger culprit. And while we’re certainly living in paradise compared to most of the world (as are you), most people here are struggling by our standards. The middle class is shrinking. The economy is allegedly better than it was 10 years ago, yet for many people it really isn’t. I’m still not making as much as I was 10 years ago. I know many people who can say the same thing.
 

gpseymour

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we've had this discussion before, the people in food deserts will get fit walking to the supper market to buy fresh food, , and as a general rule the more nutritious a foood the cheaper it is to buy, but the longer the preparation .

you can live quite well on mostly chick peas, in fact I great big % of the world do just that, and their really cheap. but then so is cabbage and rice and mutton and home made veg soup with a bit of mutton in it.

and when I was last there a decade ago, there was a significant amount of over weight middle class people in nice cars,
Yeah, again, that assumes it's both safe and feasible to walk to fresh food. Sometimes, it's more than 10 miles. While that's walkable, the time needed isn't reasonable for someone who is probably already working two jobs. You seem to not get the distances that can exist in the US without reasonable public transport. And then there's the safety issue. Walking late in some food deserts is a pretty bad idea.
 

gpseymour

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I’m still not making as much as I was 10 years ago. I know many people who can say the same thing.
If I get the job I'm currently trying for, I'll probably get close to what I was making almost 20 years ago.
 

JR 137

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If I get the job I'm currently trying for, I'll probably get close to what I was making almost 20 years ago.
If I get the one I’m going for (and have a great chance as my prospective boss and interviewer is a good friend), I’ll be about even with my 2009 salary after a year (the job has defined pay grade steps). Somehow the recession ended a few years ago. Sure. Because the cost of living hasn’t gone up in the 12 years in between those. That’ll hopefully be a $12k raise from my current job.

Remember when our parents told us if we got a college degree we wouldn’t have to worry about making ends meet?
 

dvcochran

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If I get the job I'm currently trying for, I'll probably get close to what I was making almost 20 years ago.[
If I get the one I’m going for (and have a great chance as my prospective boss and interviewer is a good friend), I’ll be about even with my 2009 salary after a year (the job has defined pay grade steps). Somehow the recession ended a few years ago. Sure. Because the cost of living hasn’t gone up in the 12 years in between those. That’ll hopefully be a $12k raise from my current job.

Remember when our parents told us if we got a college degree we wouldn’t have to worry about making ends meet?
May I ask what kind of work you will be doing? Just curious.
 
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mrt2

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I wish you luck on your brown belt test! I'm in a similar position, having resumed training recently. I try not to be presumptuous, and I know there are as many opinions on dieting as there are people with opinions. Perhaps more, because of people changing their minds. But I do believe two things hold true, calories in need to be less than calories out to lose weight, and the best diet is the one you can maintain over time.
This has been a good year of training. My fitness has improved and I am going into this summer in better shape than I have been in 10 years, which is a good thing. Well, I know there are areas where I need to do better, like sugar, simple carbs, and lunches out. I am hopeful that making these changes, along with the natural increase in physical activity that happens every summer will help with the weight loss. But I have lost and gained weight enough times to know obesity is a long term problem that never really goes away. You just get better control of it at times, and at other times, it gets control of you. I lost a lot of weight in high school and kept it off until I went off to college, when I gained a lot of weight. More recently, I lost a lot of weight 15 years ago and kept it off for 5 years, then gained a lot of it back after I had an injury that kept me away from the gym for a few months. For the last 10 years, weight loss and gain has been a bit seasonal, losing a bit of weight in the summer months, gaining it back in the winter. Part of my coming back to martial arts was to get back to the notion of staying in shape year round.

I think it is a combination of factors that go into why people (even those who have had bariatric surgery) can't lose significant body weight and keep it off permanently. My personal opinion is, if you are ever overweight at a young age, the chances are it will be an issue your whole life. At least if you live here in the US. One of the reasons why I hate to see kids as young as 8 or 9 who are already obese because I know that even if they manage to lose weight as teenagers, they will likely struggle to maintain that weight as they grow older..
 

gpseymour

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Remember when our parents told us if we got a college degree we wouldn’t have to worry about making ends meet?
Had I actually done that, I'm not sure it would have changed much. I had mono my last semester in college (after about 6 years) and had to drop two classes I needed to graduate: macroeconomics and psych senior seminar. I did all the work for both, but missed too many classes to be able to do the final exam (in econ) or participate in the final discussion (in senior seminar). But my degree would have been in General Psychology, which wouldn't help much for the kinds of jobs I've tended to prefer. I am always leaning on my psych background, and continue to learn more there. Frankly, if I'd had the time and money over the last 10 years, I'd have finished that degree and gone on to do a masters, mostly because I always wanted to. I did go back and start working on a business degree about 10 years ago with an online college, but the cost was too high and the quality of classes too low (nearly all the content was discussion among the students, most of whom didn't appear to have even read the text...just reading the text was by far the most useful part of the class).
 

gpseymour

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This has been a good year of training. My fitness has improved and I am going into this summer in better shape than I have been in 10 years, which is a good thing. Well, I know there are areas where I need to do better, like sugar, simple carbs, and lunches out. I am hopeful that making these changes, along with the natural increase in physical activity that happens every summer will help with the weight loss. But I have lost and gained weight enough times to know obesity is a long term problem that never really goes away. You just get better control of it at times, and at other times, it gets control of you. I lost a lot of weight in high school and kept it off until I went off to college, when I gained a lot of weight. More recently, I lost a lot of weight 15 years ago and kept it off for 5 years, then gained a lot of it back after I had an injury that kept me away from the gym for a few months. For the last 10 years, weight loss and gain has been a bit seasonal, losing a bit of weight in the summer months, gaining it back in the winter. Part of my coming back to martial arts was to get back to the notion of staying in shape year round.

I think it is a combination of factors that go into why people (even those who have had bariatric surgery) can't lose significant body weight and keep it off permanently. My personal opinion is, if you are ever overweight at a young age, the chances are it will be an issue your whole life. At least if you live here in the US. One of the reasons why I hate to see kids as young as 8 or 9 who are already obese because I know that even if they manage to lose weight as teenagers, they will likely struggle to maintain that weight as they grow older..
I haven't seen enough solid evidence on this to fully satisfy me, but what I have seen tends to agree. We now know that genetics is more than whether you have a given gene - they can be "activated" (my term, maybe not the correct technical term) and "deactivated" during our lives. It seems there's probably some of this going on with childhood obesity. And artificial sweeteners are probably making the problem worse.
 

DocWard

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Remember when our parents told us if we got a college degree we wouldn’t have to worry about making ends meet?

My Dad wanted me to go into HVAC or welding. But Nooooooo... I had to go to college... I'm glad I went to college, though, because I have an amazing wife I met there, and two wonderful daughters. How can I regret that? Otherwise, I think I would have been much happier either career active duty military, or as a park ranger or something of the sort. I know I can say that despite all I didn't like about it, I enjoyed being a medic and an NCO in the National Guard, complete with deployments, better than being a lawyer.
 

dvcochran

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I'm hoping to be working as an implementation consultant for a bank-oriented tech firm, on a loan origination platform. It's a half-technical job.
I different circles of course, it sounds similar to the program directors I often deal with. They launch new products and product changes.
 

gpseymour

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I different circles of course, it sounds similar to the program directors I often deal with. They launch new products and product changes.
In this case, it's helping a new bank client implement the new system. There's some project management, some back-end configuration, and some client training.
 
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mrt2

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So I passed my brown belt test. It was a small group of testers in our group. Just 4 people in the higher group, and since I was the oldest and highest ranking student, I had to lead the group. There is no place to hide when you are leading a group of just 4 students. I made a small mistake in one of my linear forms, and the master caught it and made me do it again by myself. But that was the worst of it. The rest of the test went off pretty smoothly.

Now I need to up my game,
 

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