Single Sinawali

Rich Parsons

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Single Sinawali

The Basic Pattern is with two canes.

Right Hand Strikes a number 1, then a number 8.

Left Hand then Strikes a NUmber 1, then a Number 8.

See Stricking 1 -12 for a description of the strikes.


This pattern is also used in the Solo Baston Techniques and Drills.

The Striking pattern is :

Right Hand Strikes a Number 1

Then the Right hand strikes a number 8

Then the Right hand strikes a number 2

Then the Right hand strikes a number 9


This can be applied also with the left hand.

Any Additional thoughts ?????


:asian:
 
It's a useful stick drill.

But sometimes I think people work too hard at dragging empty-hand applications out of it, to be honest. There are some good ones to be found in it but others seem forced.
 
Any Additional thoughts ?????


Sure, there are many different exercises, principles and concepts, that can be applied within the single sinawali drill.


Try to insert stabs in the sinawali. Only one person is executing the stabs, the other person is still continuing the normal single sinawali.

Insert stabs from the outside:

try to insert a stab number 10 with the right hand instead a strike number 1.
The same on the other side, a left stab number 10 instead of a left strike 1.


Insert stabs from the inside:

after the 2 strikes with the right hand, the number one and 8, usually the strike 3rd strike is executed with the left hand as a left number 1. Instead of this, add a stab number 11 with the right hand and then strike the normal 4th, a number 8 with the left hand.
Now the left hand stabs a number 11, followed by a right hand number 8., then again the right 11 and the left 8 followed by another left 11.
You see, now instead of the first 4 strikes being right high, right low, left high, left low, you changed to left high (stab), right low (strike), right high (stab), left low (strike).
Then you have to find the way back to the normal single sinawali, which is too hard to describe via keyboard. Just try, I am sure you will find the way.

You can combine the normal single with the single with thrust from the outside and inside, while your partner still plays the standard single Sinawali.



Reversing the hands, also called the mirror principle.

Normally, the right hands of the partners meet and then the left hands. Try to reverse this, by letting the left hand meet the right and vice versa.

It goes like this:
Still your partner continues to execute the normal singel sinawali.
But you meet his first strike, the right number one with a left number 2, his right number 8 you meet with a left number 9. His left number 1 you meet with a right number 2 and his left number 8 you meet with the right number 9.
You can continue this or follow the right number 9 with a right number 1 and you are back to normal single sinawali.



Different hights, also called the complement principle.

Try to meet the high strikes of your partner only with the right hand, while you meet the low strikes only with the left hand and then vice versa.
It goes like this:
right numnber 1, left number 9, right number 2, left number 8 and vice versa:
left number 2, right number 8, left number 1, right number 9.



There is much more you can do in single sinawali:
The advanced single sinawali with or without stabs, the redondo concept, the half beats or off rhythem strikes with the right or left hand from the inside or the outside. There is the what we call the "principle of 16 single sinawali strikes", and of course the disarming techniques single stick against double, either without regarding the 2nd stick and also with regarding the second stick within the single sinawali. And there are of course the single stick and empty hand applications of the single sinawali


You can find the single sinawali with stabs in the Modern arnis brown belt video I offer, a lot of the other concepts you can find in the Sinawali video of Suro Mike Inay.
You can find them here and then click either on the "Inayan Eskrima" or the "Modern Arnis" button.



If there is interest, I can show some of this during the symposium.


I hope this helps a little.


Regards from Germany


Dieter Kn羹ttel
DATU of Modern Arnis
 
When the right hand does 1 then 8 - insert a lefthand 2 on the same beat as the 8, and vice versa for the left hand 9 - righthand 1.

It is essentially a half-beat, it teaches simultaneous block strike (as the right hand blocks down the left hand is attacking.

I said hand but it can be stick, or knife, etc...

Thanks

Andy
 
Originally posted by arnisandyz
When the right hand does 1 then 8 - insert a lefthand 2 on the same beat as the 8, and vice versa for the left hand 9 - righthand 1.

It is essentially a half-beat, it teaches simultaneous block strike (as the right hand blocks down the left hand is attacking.

I said hand but it can be stick, or knife, etc...

Thanks

Andy

Because the left hand chambers above the right hand during the execution of the right hand #1, it can also be understood as teaching a simultaneous block/strike (as the left hand blocks (from left to right), the right hand hand is attacking). Moreover, as the left hand recovers to chamber on the left side, it can also be interpreted as blocking to the outside; as the right hand begins to chamber above the left hand, it follows an uppercut motion that can be used as a strike (i.e., as the left hand blocks [from right to left] the right hand is attacking).

Best,

Steve Lamade
 
But sometimes I think people work too hard at dragging empty-hand applications out of it, to be honest. There are some good ones to be found in it but others seem forced.

I have to disagree....in part. There is a tendency on the part of some to try and relate any empty hand work to a cane drill and call it "empty hand arnis" to justify a complete art instead of simply integrating punching, kicking, and the like.

On the other hand I once saw Professor Wally Jay take ten minutes or so and break down the art of Judo strictly as a single siniwalli application or derivation. Humbling to say the least.
 
Originally posted by dearnis.com
I have to disagree....in part. There is a tendency on the part of some to try and relate any empty hand work to a cane drill and call it "empty hand arnis" to justify a complete art instead of simply integrating punching, kicking, and the like.

On the other hand I once saw Professor Wally Jay take ten minutes or so and break down the art of Judo strictly as a single siniwalli application or derivation. Humbling to say the least.

I agree that you need more then jsut the stick or knife translations to emptyhands.

I also found Prof. Wally Jay Humbling.
 
Originally posted by dearnis.com
On the other hand I once saw Professor Wally Jay take ten minutes or so and break down the art of Judo strictly as a single siniwalli application or derivation. Humbling to say the least.

I would have enoyed seeing that!

I find some of the applications I've seen in Modern Arnis to be forced--attempting to fit it into single sinawali, like a square peg in a round hole. Maybe a more enlightened practitioner could show me how it isn't forced, as you suggest, or perhaps it's that my mind isn't open enough, but while I definitely like the "it's all the same" philosophy and make great use of it, I can't see single sinawali as a "universal pattern" as the Kenpoists might put it. (I don't think you're suggesting that it is.) There's good stuff in there and a good lesson to be learned in extracting things from it, but I can't see in it some of the things others see in it.

If it works for them, great!
 
Synonyms for Single Sinawali (Not all MA):

Hi-Lo (Modern Arnis)
4-Count (Various styles)
Baguhan-"The Novice" from Complete Sinawali, by R. Galang
 
Going along with Datu Dieter,

Here are some other cool variations from the book, Complete Sinawali by R. Galang

#1 - #2 Follow through strikes
R. #1 - #2
L. #1 - #2

#1 - #2 Downward Figure-Eight strikes
R. #1 - #2
L. #1 - #2

- you can also change directions or one does downward while the other does upward but when we did this more hands were hit!!! :uhyeah:
 
Palusut, I have the book by Master galang. I will reread it after reading your post.
 
mike dizon said:
Palusut, I have the book by Master galang. I will reread it after reading your post.

Hi Mike,

Please see pages 36 and 39 for the reference point that I used.

Best regards,

Palusut
 
Because of the nature of disarms, a defender might obtain the opponents stick and have to use it with a Bakal grip. This drill helps to introduce the Bakal grip to Single Sinawali.

To work on getting comfortable with the Bakal group, try single sinawali using Bakal vs Bakal and Sak-Sak vs Bakal.

When working Sak-Sak vs Bakal, make sure to remind the Sak-Sak person that they are aiming at targets, not the top of the stick (where your hand is now if you are using the Bakal grip). Some people have a habit of targeting the top of the stick instead of their target and this behavior will get old really quick with this drill. :mad:

Notice the subtle changes of range, angle, and body positioning.

Please note the following for references:

Sak-Sak - normal, natural, or hammer grip.
Bakal - Reverse or ice-pick grip.

Give it a shot,

Palusut
 
Palusut said:
Because of the nature of disarms, a defender might obtain the opponents stick and have to use it with a Bakal grip. This drill helps to introduce the Bakal grip to Single Sinawali.

To work on getting comfortable with the Bakal group, try single sinawali using Bakal vs Bakal and Sak-Sak vs Bakal.

When working Sak-Sak vs Bakal, make sure to remind the Sak-Sak person that they are aiming at targets, not the top of the stick (where your hand is now if you are using the Bakal grip). Some people have a habit of targeting the top of the stick instead of their target and this behavior will get old really quick with this drill. :mad:

Notice the subtle changes of range, angle, and body positioning.

Please note the following for references:

Sak-Sak - normal, natural, or hammer grip.
Bakal - Reverse or ice-pick grip.

Give it a shot,

Palusut

Curious...what would you be working on with the bakal grip?

I am asking because I see value in the grip for blade, but not stick. I could see value in doing sinawali's with it to work on blade translations of some sort, but I am having trouble seeing value in it for stick applications.

:asian:
 
I think that Palusut was referring to the possibility of ending up with that grip after a disarm wherein you have grabbed the opponent's stick that way, and now need to react. Best to have trained it, if you may need to use it.
 
Tulisan said:
Curious...what would you be working on with the bakal grip?

I am asking because I see value in the grip for blade, but not stick. I could see value in doing sinawali's with it to work on blade translations of some sort, but I am having trouble seeing value in it for stick applications.

:asian:

Good questions Paul!

A bakal grips could be a result mainly three scenarios:
- A disarm of the opponent's stick.
- Acquiring a stick or a dropped stick in the heat of battle.
- Style. There are some systems that use it.
- Self defense applications - translates well to sai, tonfa, police-stick, umbrellas, canes, beer bottles, etc.
- Pressure point applications.

- All these translate to solo baston pretty well.

Like anything else, it's good to work it in occassionally, so that you are familiar with it if you ever need it.

Palusut
 
Palusut said:
Good questions Paul!

A bakal grips could be a result mainly three scenarios:
- A disarm of the opponent's stick.
- Acquiring a stick or a dropped stick in the heat of battle.
- Style. There are some systems that use it.
- Self defense applications - translates well to sai, tonfa, police-stick, umbrellas, canes, beer bottles, etc.
- Pressure point applications.

- All these translate to solo baston pretty well.

Like anything else, it's good to work it in occassionally, so that you are familiar with it if you ever need it.

Palusut

Cool...thanks for your answers!

:asian:
 
Palusut said:
Good questions Paul!

A bakal grips could be a result mainly three scenarios:
- A disarm of the opponent's stick.
- Acquiring a stick or a dropped stick in the heat of battle.
- Style. There are some systems that use it.
- Self defense applications - translates well to sai, tonfa, police-stick, umbrellas, canes, beer bottles, etc.
- Pressure point applications.

- All these translate to solo baston pretty well.

Like anything else, it's good to work it in occassionally, so that you are familiar with it if you ever need it.

Palusut


Opps forgot to change numbering to 5. :asian:
 
Another great reference for bakal grip techniques is the 1980's tape series where GM Preses used the payong dos manos style for a ton of techniques which he demonstrated right and left-handed techniques based on how he rotated the stick.
 
Palusut,
Thanks for the tips with the Ray galang book. Had great time with the material.
 

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