Ship Pal Gae

white belt

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Any practicioners of an art called "Ship Pal Gae" out there? I am to understand it is a Korean Kung Fu like system with a Taoist foundation. I learned some forms, years ago, from a mixed MA style and I wonder if this is where they came from. They were simply called Pal Gae 1, 2, 3,etc. No, they are not the TKD patterns I now practice. These forms are more like sets of a yoga, Qi Gong type of exercise. A LOT of joint rotations.

Thank you,
white belt
 
Maybe I should ask the CMA practicioners. This set of movements is quite different than the standard linear forms.

white belt
 
I have only seen the word "Ship" in regard to Korean MAs in one instance. I've seen the older poomse Sip Soo, spelled Ship Soo before. I have know idea if this is in any way related to the forms you are interested in, however!
 
ship is the Korean (Chinese derived as opposed to pure Korean) word for 10, pal or p'al is 8, shipp'al is 18. I don't know what gae means.
 
Thanks for the info. I am pretty sure that the Korean name PAL GAE is the same as the Chinese name BA GUA. So SHIP PAL GAE means Eighteen Trigrams (?). There are eighteen movements in each form. Each movement would then represent a different trigram from the I-Ching.

Thanks again,
white belt
 
I recall hearing from one source that i cant remember that shi pal gae may be a korean version of praying mantis ( northern).
Also the 18 refers to 18 skills I believe.
 
Originally posted by white belt
Any practicioners of an art called "Ship Pal Gae" out there? I am to understand it is a Korean Kung Fu like system with a Taoist foundation. I learned some forms, years ago, from a mixed MA style and I wonder if this is where they came from. They were simply called Pal Gae 1, 2, 3,etc. No, they are not the TKD patterns I now practice. These forms are more like sets of a yoga, Qi Gong type of exercise. A LOT of joint rotations.

Thank you,
white belt

Ship Pal Gae (18 Weapons) refers to the Muye Dobo Tongji which is supposedly the oldest documentation of Korean martial arts available (Turtle Press has copies in English). Basically it was supposed to break it down as 17 weapon froms and 1 empty hand form. There was a system out there called the Oom Yung Doe aka Chung Moo Quan, which claimed to teach this as well. To be honest, in my extensive research of Korean martial art history, I have never come across any system of this sort. The system is either a kung-fu system that someone slapped on a Korean name on it or just a hybrid system that someone made it up. Did they teach any history to you? I would be interested in knowing.
 
Sip Pal Gi is a Korean style of Kung-Fu. In Korean, it is normally spelled "sip", but is pronounced as "ship", thus the different spellings in English.

You may want to check out Master Henry's web site at:
http://www.classicmartialarts.com

He teaches TangSooDo, TaeKwonDo, and SipPalGi. He would be the best person to ask specific questions to.

Hope this helps
 
I was thinking that if you honestly want some insight into Ship Pal Gi you may want to pick-up on a copy of Journal of Asian Martial Arts for this quarter (Vol 12, #4). There is a stellar article in there, starting on page 8, about historical Korean martial arts manuals and the latter half of the article speaks to the nature of Ship Pal Gi both in historical context and modern interpretation. FWIW

Best Wishes,

Bruce
 
I have never heard of this style, "Ship Pal Gae." I'll ask about it.

I do know that we have a 6th or 7th Dan form requirement in Chayon-Ryu called, "Ship Pal," which is a Chuan-fa form from Chan Chun, Manchuria. I'm not ranked high enough to learn the form yet.

R. McLain
 
I found out that "Ship Pal Ki" is another name used for Kung-fu in S. Korea. One noted instructor was Master Lee, Poe-hang who started teaching kung-fu in Seoul in the 1960's - through I don't know if he called his style "Ship Pal Ki." As an FYI: He taught/teaches the form So Ho Yon that was mentioned in other, previous post topics. I don't know if Master Lee, Poe-hang is still instructing.

I made a mistake about the form "Ship Pal" in my other post. "Ship Pal" is a karate form, not a chuan-fa form as I previously posted.

R. McLain
 
I found out that "Ship Pal Ki" is another name used for Kung-fu in S. Korea. One noted instructor was Master Lee, Poe-hang who started teaching kung-fu in Seoul in the 1960's - through I don't know if he called his style "Ship Pal Ki." As an FYI: He taught/teaches the form So Ho Yon that was mentioned in other, previous post topics. I don't know if Master Lee, Poe-hang is still instructing.

I made a mistake about the form "Ship Pal" in my other post. "Ship Pal" is a karate form, not a chuan-fa form as I previously posted.

R. McLain

Here's something that seems to go along with your statement. It's a website to a school in OK that teaches Nornern Long Fist Kung Fu. Check it out. I wonder if this is really typical of "Ship Pal Gi".

www.kungfu-wushu.com
 
I was thinking that if you honestly want some insight into Ship Pal Gi you may want to pick-up on a copy of Journal of Asian Martial Arts for this quarter (Vol 12, #4). There is a stellar article in there, starting on page 8, about historical Korean martial arts manuals and the latter half of the article speaks to the nature of Ship Pal Gi both in historical context and modern interpretation. FWIW

Best Wishes,

Bruce

That article can be downloaded at:

Part 1: http://www.taekwon.com.ar/a.pdf
Part 2: http://www.taekwon.com.ar/b.pdf
Part 3: http://www.taekwon.com.ar/c.pdf
Part 4: http://www.taekwon.com.ar/d.pdf

Swallow
 
Any practicioners of an art called "Ship Pal Gae" out there? I am to understand it is a Korean Kung Fu like system with a Taoist foundation. I learned some forms, years ago, from a mixed MA style and I wonder if this is where they came from. They were simply called Pal Gae 1, 2, 3,etc. No, they are not the TKD patterns I now practice. These forms are more like sets of a yoga, Qi Gong type of exercise. A LOT of joint rotations.

Thank you,
white belt
right here
Sip Pal Gi (short for Sip Pal Ban Byung Gi) can be translated as The 18 Weapons System or The 18 Skills System. The other name that most Koreans recognize is So Rim Kwon Bup (Shaolin Quan Fa in Chinese) which means Shaolin Fist Method in Korean.
The system is authentic traditional Northern Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu. When the Shaolin Temples in China were being burned many monks fled for refuge in other countries. Many of the monks from the Shantung Province fled to Korea. Shantung Province in China is famous for its Praying Mantis and this is why many Kung Fu systems taught in Korea claim to have a Northern Praying Mantis lineage. full info here
 

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