rougher than muay thai

M

muayThaiPerson

Guest
did anyone know about an art named Thaiyuth? Its the father of muay thai. maybe grandfather. HIHGLY DEADLY and way more serious than muay thai. if you know any forgotten arts, post them and tell us a little bout them.
 
Originally posted by muayThaiPerson
did anyone know about an art named Thaiyuth? Its the father of muay thai. maybe grandfather. HIHGLY DEADLY and way more serious than muay thai. if you know any forgotten arts, post them and tell us a little bout them.

I could Be Mistaken ,,, I Thought Mauy Thai
Came from Kabri Kabrong????
 
well, I do quarterstaff fighting, which is kind of like bo staff, except a quarterstaff is longer, about a half inch thicker, and a heck of a lot heavier (usually oak or ash or mahogany). The style of fighting is fairly similar to bo. The movie "Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves" has a decent staff fighting scene.
 
Originally posted by muayThaiPerson
did anyone know about an art named Thaiyuth? Its the father of muay thai. maybe grandfather. HIHGLY DEADLY and way more serious than muay thai. if you know any forgotten arts, post them and tell us a little bout them.
I thought muay thai was used with krabbi krabong. From what I'm guessing, I would like to think that tahiyuth is muay thai... Just without the rules and limitations, designed for pure combat, like the other combat arts out there.


The ancient warriors needed to be skilled at both weapons and empty hand techniques. Winning was not an option; it was a necessity. You lose, you die! Once you understand this you will understand why the battle-tested arts of Thailand are no-nonsense and extremely brutal. It didn't start off as a form of entertainment; it was what kept a people of a nation alive.

The weapon system especially required extreme concentration. One false move and a blade would take your life away. This is why spiritual components are an integral part of the Thai fighting arts. Both Muay Thai and Krabi-Krabong require the Thai fighters to engage in spiritual dances (known as ram) to: "(1) pay homage and tribute to teachers and those whom gratitude was due. (2) consecrate a blessing on the performer, a morale booster, and as a shield against nervousness and fear. (3) show the origin of the boxer, what camp he belonged to, as each camp had its own distinct style" (Muay Thai - The Most Distinguished Art of Fighting by Panya Kraitus and Dr. Pitisuk Kraitus, 1998, page 82). In Muay Thai, the dance is known as ram muay or wai kru. In krabi-krabong, it is known as ram daab. Click here for more information on krabi krabong and the sacred Buddhai Sawan Institute of Bangkok, Thailand.
(Above Left) Krabi-Krabong practitioners going through their drills in a holy place.

(Above Right) In high-level performance, the spiritual drills pay off. One false move even in such an exhibition could prove fatal. Krabi-Krabong is extremely fast and during practice sparks can be seen from the contact of the blades.
Albeit Muay Thai was originally designed for battles against enemy nations in the ancient days, its practitioners have always used sport to test their skills. In the old days before the ring was introduced, fighters would have confrontations on the natural ground surrounded by enthusiastic spectators. Hands were wrapped with cloth in lieu of boxing gloves. Sometimes, the wrapping were dipped in finely crushed glass to create a mild abrasion. Contrary to what is portrayed by ill-informed Hollywood movies, these were not big chunks of sharp glass. Today, this old way of fighting may be observed at temple festivals in the more agrarian regions of Thailand. Because the fights took place on temple ground (wat), it is often called Muay Wat (temple boxing). Also because this was the way the famous Thai fighter Naikhanomthom beat ten of Burma's best fighters as a war captive in 1774, this type of Muay Thai tournament have been given an exotic name Muay Pama (Burmese Boxing) by the Thais. It is however, Thai in origin.
 
Krabi Krabong is the weapon art.

I really do not think it is appropriate to describe a MA as more deadly or more serious than XYZ or whatever art. It is not the art itself. Rather it is the practice of the art, that matters. If you got smacked in the nuts, does it matter whether it was from a MuayThai front kick, Shotokan front kick, Kyokushin front kick, Tang Soo Do front kick, ITF front kick, WingChun kick, or Chuck Norris Chun Kuk Do front kick (yes, CHucky Cheese has founded his own martial art now)? You can bet your ***, all the kicks are equally deadly and serious when your nuts got smashed. (Your nuts wouldn't know the difference. ) LOL

MauyThai seems "more deadly and serious" is mostly due to the lax of ring rules in the sport. You can have a Karate comp or a TKD comp that is just as "deadly and serious" if you adopt the MuayThai rules.
 
Originally posted by Johnathan Napalm


MauyThai seems "more deadly and serious" is mostly due to the lax of ring rules in the sport. You can have a Karate comp or a TKD comp that is just as "deadly and serious" if you adopt the MuayThai rules.

Good post...

Respectfully,
 

Latest Discussions

Back
Top