Rolled ankle injury ;)

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_Simon_

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Well, congratulations. Sounds like you did well, even in a format you're not very familiar with.
Ah cheers! Yeah it meant alot to me, I've chronicled in my other thread my journey through the tournaments and the lead up to this one. Big sordid story haha.. and probably no more tournaments this year anyways.
 

Yokozuna514

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Have watched it back a few times, so you mean that just in general I was too airborne/not rooted when I tried to retreat
No I don't believe you were 'too airborne'. While it does look like the sequence was off when you pushed off your lead foot (foot not planted), I think the issue may have more to do with the 'way' you are retreating. When you go backwards it does two things:

1) It encourages your opponent to build momentum and confidence.
2) It causes more stress to you as you approach the end of the tatami.

Perhaps in point fighting, this retreat strategy is accepted however I favour a more tai sabaki approach to retreating. In other words, I move to the side (generally away from the power leg) which will cause your opponent to turn towards you and adjust. It also allows you to remain in striking range instead of 'bouncing' in and out.

There is nothing wrong with bouncing, by the way, but generally your feet should be parallel. When you have your lead foot pointing to your opponent and your back foot pointing to the side or behind you, the contact surface of each foot may strike the ground at different times and cause you to roll your ankle. My two cents.
 

jobo

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That's an overly simplistic understanding of what injury is. I managed just fine for weeks with a muscle torn 25% through in my forearm. But certain things - relatively small things - caused significant pain. I found out later that significant pain was me re-tearing any healing it had done. So, it wasn't healing. It wasn't getting better. What fixed it? Finding out (from a professional) what was actually wrong, how to avoid re-injury so it could heal, and finding the right exercises to help heal it (not just randomly continuing with what I normally did).

Your advice can work by accident, but it can also lead to worsening an injury.
Milkions of people " injure" themselves everyday playing sports or just walking about, only a very low % of those need a medical specialists, as the body is quite adapt at healing its self, of those a twisted ankle nust be a high % of the non requiring medIcal attention cases, you are dependent on the medical system you live with either wasting recourses or your own money.

That you were stupid enough to tear a muscle a quarter of the way thiugh and just as stupid to ignore the obvious trauma doesn't mean that every one with a minor injury should or requires to seek medical attention.

This is obviously a middle class,Good health insurance, first world affectation, the rest of the world doesnt run crying to a doctor over f next to nothing
 
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_Simon_

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No I don't believe you were 'too airborne'. While it does look like the sequence was off when you pushed off your lead foot (foot not planted), I think the issue may have more to do with the 'way' you are retreating. When you go backwards it does two things:

1) It encourages your opponent to build momentum and confidence.
2) It causes more stress to you as you approach the end of the tatami.

Perhaps in point fighting, this retreat strategy is accepted however I favour a more tai sabaki approach to retreating. In other words, I move to the side (generally away from the power leg) which will cause your opponent to turn towards you and adjust. It also allows you to remain in striking range instead of 'bouncing' in and out.

There is nothing wrong with bouncing, by the way, but generally your feet should be parallel. When you have your lead foot pointing to your opponent and your back foot pointing to the side or behind you, the contact surface of each foot may strike the ground at different times and cause you to roll your ankle. My two cents.

Ah yeah I see what you mean. And yeah I'm also a big fan of tai sabaki and moving off to the side, angling etc, I do incorporate a bit of that but at times it feels faster to retreat and reevaluate. Especially when being charged, but I'd love to work on getting moving off to the side even faster. But yeah for sure there are downsides to constantly retreating, even for oneself mentally.

Ah will keep that in mind too, cheers :)
 
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Milkions of people " injure" themselves everyday playing sports or just walking about, only a very low % of those need a medical specialists, as the body is quite adapt at healing its self, of those a twisted ankle nust be a high % of the non requiring medIcal attention cases, you are dependent on the medical system you live with either wasting recourses or your own money.

That you were stupid enough to tear a muscle a quarter of the way thiugh and just as stupid to ignore the obvious trauma doesn't mean that every one with a minor injury should or requires to seek medical attention.

This is obviously a middle class,Good health insurance, first world affectation, the rest of the world doesnt run crying to a doctor over f next to nothing

Lol.. okeydokey!


The body only heals itself if you let it. But some things do need attention, care and skill that you can't give it to heal.

Sometimes it's totally, 100%, absolutely okay to ask for help. Doesn't make one weak, stupid, or a crybaby.
 

jobo

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Lol.. okeydokey!


The body only heals itself if you let it. But some things do need attention, care and skill that you can't give it to heal.

Sometimes it's totally, 100%, absolutely okay to ask for help. Doesn't make one weak, stupid, or a crybaby.
No the body generalky heals its self, its sort of a design function that got us frpthrough about 4 milkions years of twisted ankles, before then invented the ct scanner.

Have you actually been to the doctors yet, you seem to be in agreement with the get ut checked out cry babies, whilst not having the motivation to actually get of your bum and go
 

Yokozuna514

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Ah yeah I see what you mean. And yeah I'm also a big fan of tai sabaki and moving off to the side, angling etc, I do incorporate a bit of that but at times it feels faster to retreat and reevaluate. Especially when being charged, but I'd love to work on getting moving off to the side even faster. But yeah for sure there are downsides to constantly retreating, even for oneself mentally.

Ah will keep that in mind too, cheers :)
What I am suggesting when you are in these types of matches and want to incorporate tai sabaki movement, you need to think of yourself like a matador. A matador that retreats backwards will be run over. A matador that dodges to the side remains close enough to plant the sword. To do this effectively, you need to control the middle by keeping your hands up (elbows in front of your body). When the charge comes, your hands/forearms can deflect the punch or kick as you move to their back side. Your opponents momentum will put them in the perfect position for you to strike. I have found this to work very well against aggressive opponents but my application is in Kyokushin sparring. Food for thought.
 

JR 137

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That's really helpful, thanks heaps mate. Yeah I'm actually not very used to point sparring (coming from Kyokushin sparring for 8 years), so it's a different style of moving and footwork, but yeah I totally get what you mean. And the fact he was moving in towards me meant I had to react quickly and probably didn't get a chance to get into a proper stance before retreating, hence the roll hey!

I'll have to work on drilling that when I train for my next one, appreciate the insights :)

The final score was 4-2 my way. Ended up winning my next bout too and the state title which I was stoked about... I must have forgotten about my ankle for the rest of the day haha (adrenaline helped).
Adrenaline always helps. At one tournament, I roundhouse kicked a guy who blocked it; I full power kicked the point of his elbow with my instep. It hurt a little but not much. Fought two more matches after that without thinking about it. After I changed and watched some classmates compete, it started to throb. When got home, I couldn’t take my shoe off without taking the laces completely out. The adrenaline wore off.

I went to urgent care the next day. The doctor looks at it and says “if that’s not broken, I don’t know what is.” It wasn’t broken, just severely bruised. I walked like Frankenstein for a good week or two. Andrenaline’s am interesting thing.
 

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And I've just gone back to look at the vid of the fight in which it happened, managed to find the exact frame where it happened haha, ouch.. right foot flexed and turned in, must have got caught on the mat...
0e0c746e3d6ea5c552bbba499c8e3ee4.jpg
89ccc7a8db42b5425f6541a4d188f790.jpg

Yeah he came in suddenly and I have no idea what happened, but I moved back and must have gotten caught. I think he actually stomped down onto my hip haha.

Posted the vid here anyway, we might all learn something about "how sports injuries occur" haha. The exact moment it happens is at 0:36s


Edit: I actually just watched it back in 0.25x speed (forgot you could do that on YouTube)... yeah ouch, looks like it just got caught or something as I moved back..
That hurts just to look at.
 

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Milkions of people " injure" themselves everyday playing sports or just walking about, only a very low % of those need a medical specialists, as the body is quite adapt at healing its self, of those a twisted ankle nust be a high % of the non requiring medIcal attention cases, you are dependent on the medical system you live with either wasting recourses or your own money.

That you were stupid enough to tear a muscle a quarter of the way thiugh and just as stupid to ignore the obvious trauma doesn't mean that every one with a minor injury should or requires to seek medical attention.

This is obviously a middle class,Good health insurance, first world affectation, the rest of the world doesnt run crying to a doctor over f next to nothing
You entirely miss the point. Quite on purpose, I assume, based on your obvious trolling bits in there. Obvious troll is obvious.
 

gpseymour

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Lol.. okeydokey!


The body only heals itself if you let it. But some things do need attention, care and skill that you can't give it to heal.

Sometimes it's totally, 100%, absolutely okay to ask for help. Doesn't make one weak, stupid, or a crybaby.
It's okay. He's trolling. He occasionally does stuff like this to get an argument.
 
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_Simon_

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No the body generalky heals its self, its sort of a design function that got us frpthrough about 4 milkions years of twisted ankles, before then invented the ct scanner.

Have you actually been to the doctors yet, you seem to be in agreement with the get ut checked out cry babies, whilst not having the motivation to actually get of your bum and go

Cool, maybe I just haven't evolved properly! (Yeah and those folk probably got eaten by lions [emoji14] )

Nup heading in next week probably. Was going to see what some proper rest this week does to it.
 
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_Simon_

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What I am suggesting when you are in these types of matches and want to incorporate tai sabaki movement, you need to think of yourself like a matador. A matador that retreats backwards will be run over. A matador that dodges to the side remains close enough to plant the sword. To do this effectively, you need to control the middle by keeping your hands up (elbows in front of your body). When the charge comes, your hands/forearms can deflect the punch or kick as you move to their back side. Your opponents momentum will put them in the perfect position for you to strike. I have found this to work very well against aggressive opponents but my application is in Kyokushin sparring. Food for thought.

Cheers, great thoughts :)
 
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Ah yeah just an update here (as I'm sure you've ALL been literally hanging on the edge of your seats to know the state of my life/ankle!), went to the docs few weeks ago and I had an x-ray done, have an ultrasound booked for next week (3 weeks from when I had the docs appointment, ultrasounds are so hard to book here haha, such long waits). Haven't heard back anything about the x-ray so I think the ultrasound will be more informative.

Ankle has gotten a bit better but it's still hurting and not right.
 

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Yeah. It’s been a bit too long to simply be an ankle sprain IMO.

Then again, it could be what’s commonly called a “high ankle sprain” aka syndesmosis sprain. Those take quite a while to heal vs the traditional ankle sprain, aka anterior talofibular ligament sprain.

But watching the video, it’s not how a high ankle sprain usually occurs. High ankle sprain usually occurs with a foot somewhat planted and twisting around it. Stranger things have happened though. I’ve seen things and thought because the mechanism of injury, it would be a classic whatever injury, only to get proven completely wrong by imagining.

I remember one of my former team orthopedists giving me a very hard time about mis-diagnosing an ankle fracture that ended up needing surgery. The doc looked at me and said “how could you possibly mistake that? How long have you been doing this job?” He was a real a-hole. So I said “well, his mechanism of injury was (insert long jargon here) and he walked off the field on his own and didn’t complain of pain for 2 hours. I can show you the video if you’d like. And I’ve been doing this job for 10 years now, thank you.” Doc looked at us, shrugged his shoulders, and said “no idea how you broke that by doing what he said. No idea how you walked off on your own. No idea how it didn’t bother you that much for 2 hours. But I guess stranger things have happened.”

I really hated that doctor. But he’s honestly one of the best orthopedic surgeons there is. And he won’t hesitate to tell anyone who asks either :)
 

JowGaWolf

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Ah yeah just an update here (as I'm sure you've ALL been literally hanging on the edge of your seats to know the state of my life/ankle!), went to the docs few weeks ago and I had an x-ray done, have an ultrasound booked for next week (3 weeks from when I had the docs appointment, ultrasounds are so hard to book here haha, such long waits). Haven't heard back anything about the x-ray so I think the ultrasound will be more informative.

Ankle has gotten a bit better but it's still hurting and not right.
Wish you the best of luck with that. It's been about 2 months right?
 
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Yeah. It’s been a bit too long to simply be an ankle sprain IMO.

Then again, it could be what’s commonly called a “high ankle sprain” aka syndesmosis sprain. Those take quite a while to heal vs the traditional ankle sprain, aka anterior talofibular ligament sprain.

But watching the video, it’s not how a high ankle sprain usually occurs. High ankle sprain usually occurs with a foot somewhat planted and twisting around it. Stranger things have happened though. I’ve seen things and thought because the mechanism of injury, it would be a classic whatever injury, only to get proven completely wrong by imagining.

I remember one of my former team orthopedists giving me a very hard time about mis-diagnosing an ankle fracture that ended up needing surgery. The doc looked at me and said “how could you possibly mistake that? How long have you been doing this job?” He was a real a-hole. So I said “well, his mechanism of injury was (insert long jargon here) and he walked off the field on his own and didn’t complain of pain for 2 hours. I can show you the video if you’d like. And I’ve been doing this job for 10 years now, thank you.” Doc looked at us, shrugged his shoulders, and said “no idea how you broke that by doing what he said. No idea how you walked off on your own. No idea how it didn’t bother you that much for 2 hours. But I guess stranger things have happened.”

I really hated that doctor. But he’s honestly one of the best orthopedic surgeons there is. And he won’t hesitate to tell anyone who asks either :)
Ah right, yeah you'll get them types ;).

I did read that sprains can awhile to heal, and I figure because I have to walk on it all the time it's not exactly going to be a quick heal. But will see what the ultrasound says. It's definitely getting better, just really really slowly, just still hurts and still doesn't feel like I've got full range of motion yet.
 
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