Really knowing your aikido

brothershaw

Purple Belt
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To all aikido praticioners, how often if ever do you try to use your aikido against another martial artist. I am not talking about sparring or point sparring, but attempting to use your technique/s against another trained martial artist who is resisting/ and attacking so you gain some perspective of how difficult or easy some things may be to do.
Always and only practicing with people of your style and your school can tend to give you a comfort zone that only relates to your style or school.
I know some people study aikido for self defense and i am looking for honest answers. This is not meant to be an inflammatory question.
 
We'll I do jujitsu and Arnis also, so yes I use my aikido.

Does it work, yes. Does it fail, yes. Do I learn from working out in other styles yes, but as time passes they blend, and they fit together.

/Yari
 
I don't do Aikido, I am a karate man. But my best friend does Aikido and we spar very often. He catches me off guard often and will throw me around, vice versa. However after he throws me one time I learn how to roll out of the move and that move is not very effective anymore.
 
There's an interesting article on this ("Uke-from-Hell") in one of the Aikido magazines--Aikido Today? Aikido Quarterly? I just saw it on the newsstand this evening!
 
If I remember right, O-Sensei once said that "80% of Aikido is atemi," or something like that. In the earlier years of Aikido, atemi was a standard part of executing many techniques, but that has now been brushed to the side.
Could it be that atemi is what helped make those techniques so effective in yesteryear?
 
Originally posted by yilisifu
If I remember right, O-Sensei once said that "80% of Aikido is atemi," or something like that. In the earlier years of Aikido, atemi was a standard part of executing many techniques, but that has now been brushed to the side.
Could it be that atemi is what helped make those techniques so effective in yesteryear?
Absolutely YiliSifu,

O-Sensei's involvement with religion, definitely had some negative effects in the latter years. In the early years it was more like Daito Ryu, and his Dojo was called the "Hell Dojo".

Beginning to intermediate students must always depend on multiple atemi specially in between the spinning techniques until their timming and techniques mature.

Respectfully,
 
Originally posted by arnisador
There's an interesting article on this ("Uke-from-Hell") in one of the Aikido magazines--Aikido Today? Aikido Quarterly? I just saw it on the newsstand this evening!


I've just recieved the mag. and havn't had a chance to read it yet. But I'm looking forward to it.

/Yari
 
Originally posted by kenmpoka
Absolutely YiliSifu,

O-Sensei's involvement with religion, definitely had some negative effects in the latter years. In the early years it was more like Daito Ryu, and his Dojo was called the "Hell Dojo".

Beginning to intermediate students must always depend on multiple atemi specially in between the spinning techniques until their timming and techniques mature.

Respectfully,

I would say that atmei is a natural part of Aikido, even if you an "expert". But you wouldn't be dependant upon the atemi as you would as a beginner.

/Yari
 
I have not practiced with others outside of aikido, but I have noticed in going to seminars in other states, that just practicing my aikido style with another aikido style aikidoka brings to light a lot of problems! A difference in attacks and a difference in uke and ukemi, as well as in a difference in nage and technique. I think in our dojo, we are all very 'cooperative' with each other until we get to a certain stage of practice where we can be a little less cooperative, and actually challenge nage more.

I think the hardest one for me to adjust to is when doing shomenuch nikkyo or ikkyo URA, that if uke doesnt bend their arm, it totally throws me off. I need that arm bent to bring them around. In our dojo, we are taught as uke to bend the arm a bit to keep the elbow from being hyper-extended or hurt. But it also makes the technique much easier to me. So I think I have it down pretty well until a newcomer or a visitor comes and doesnt bend their elbow. I think it is good to practice with different dojos and styles within aikido - but I imagine I am quite a ways off from being able to do competent technique with a non-aikidoist!

But I look forward to the day when I can! It will be interesting to learn from another art.

Peace!
 
Originally posted by arnisador
There's an interesting article on this ("Uke-from-Hell") in one of the Aikido magazines--Aikido Today? Aikido Quarterly? I just saw it on the newsstand this evening!

OK, now I've read it.

It's a good article. It's about how to handle uke's that dont react that nicly. It uses the 9-11 attack to show how the real life situation is applied for aikido.

What I got from the article was that randori or free techniques should be an important part of aikido pratice, because there you get closer to reality.

I would say that it's a good read for all MA.

/Yari
 
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