Q&A with Ken Good

Brian King

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Interesting article.
http://articles.directorym.net/QA_with_Ken_Good_San_Jose_CA-r878938-San_Jose_CA.html

LET: When I hear the phrase "light control" in relation to law enforcement, the first thing that comes to mind is an officer with a flashlight and a gun. You say it's a whole lot more. Could you explain?

Good: I would say 10 years ago, even 15 years ago, the prime directive for using a light was to identify what you had in front of you, and that hasn't changed. Most of your information comes through the portal of your eyes. Until you can't see or you don't have a light, you don't really appreciate how important that tool is. But because of the nature of the use of light, we tend to look at light or use of a light as, "What can I see?" In other words, it's only from one angle or one side of the coin: What do I see. However, if you step back for a second and say, "What does he or she see when I energize this tool?" it becomes a potential target indicator for you, as well as a distraction or a tool that you're actually using to put yourself in a more dangerous position than if you didn't use it at all.

Warmest regards
Brian King
 

sgtmac_46

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Interesting article.
http://articles.directorym.net/QA_with_Ken_Good_San_Jose_CA-r878938-San_Jose_CA.html

LET: When I hear the phrase "light control" in relation to law enforcement, the first thing that comes to mind is an officer with a flashlight and a gun. You say it's a whole lot more. Could you explain?

Good: I would say 10 years ago, even 15 years ago, the prime directive for using a light was to identify what you had in front of you, and that hasn't changed. Most of your information comes through the portal of your eyes. Until you can't see or you don't have a light, you don't really appreciate how important that tool is. But because of the nature of the use of light, we tend to look at light or use of a light as, "What can I see?" In other words, it's only from one angle or one side of the coin: What do I see. However, if you step back for a second and say, "What does he or she see when I energize this tool?" it becomes a potential target indicator for you, as well as a distraction or a tool that you're actually using to put yourself in a more dangerous position than if you didn't use it at all.

Warmest regards
Brian King

Ken provides some of the best low-light law enforcement tactical training around......and has innovated much in the realm of tactics and tools for that work. I carry the Night-ops Gladius on my duty belt with the strobbing effect that Ken helped design for use during those searches to disorient and distract suspects.

http://www.defensereview.com/modules.php?name=News&file=print&sid=685

In addition, Good's book, 'The Strategies of Low-Light Engagements', is a must have! http://www.order-gear.com/product-nop.asp?0=973&1=1360&3=8032
 
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