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foggymorning162

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I resently started a job working with people with disabilities and just finished doing my PMT (physical/phsycological management training) I was just wondering if anyone else has done this training and how effective you felt it was and also if you ever had to use it. If you have used it was it effective.

For those who haven't taken PMT some of the techniques are similar to basic self defence but you are not allowed to inflict pain on the person.
The point is to protect the person from harm as much as possible if you see one client going to hit another client your job is to draw the attack so you get hit not them etc.

The one technique I really had a problem with though is hair grabs. We were taught what to do in the event of a hair grab. I'm sure you have all done hair grab techniques, the first move is to secure their hand to stablize your neck and spine and so they can't rip your hair out...well in PMT that is also the last move, you secure their hand and wait for them to let go I guess you still have one hand free to block your face as they pummel it with their other fist.

If anyone has a technique that might be PMT acceptable I would love to hear it but no pain compliance as that is not allowed, besides I know a few of those already :uhyeah: :angel:
 

sparky12

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Sounds like changing jobs could be an option, but if you squeeze the hollow spot between the wrist and hand using your thumb and index finger it will help loosen their grip. As we all know it is difficult to control someone, especially without hurting them. Good luck.
Regards, Don
 

jks9199

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I resently started a job working with people with disabilities and just finished doing my PMT (physical/phsycological management training) I was just wondering if anyone else has done this training and how effective you felt it was and also if you ever had to use it. If you have used it was it effective.

For those who haven't taken PMT some of the techniques are similar to basic self defence but you are not allowed to inflict pain on the person.
The point is to protect the person from harm as much as possible if you see one client going to hit another client your job is to draw the attack so you get hit not them etc.

The one technique I really had a problem with though is hair grabs. We were taught what to do in the event of a hair grab. I'm sure you have all done hair grab techniques, the first move is to secure their hand to stablize your neck and spine and so they can't rip your hair out...well in PMT that is also the last move, you secure their hand and wait for them to let go I guess you still have one hand free to block your face as they pummel it with their other fist.

If anyone has a technique that might be PMT acceptable I would love to hear it but no pain compliance as that is not allowed, besides I know a few of those already :uhyeah: :angel:
Remember that the goals in the tactics taught for your job are different than those of self defense. You're not trying to stop an attack; you're managing the situation so that both you and your patient/client take the minimum damage. So the tactics chosen are adapted to manage and gradually restrain, rather than stop and deter further attacks. It's similar to the difference in the way that police defensive tactics aren't the same as simple self defense, or martial arts; a cop's job is to protect himself, and subdue and contain the attacker using only the force reasonably necessary. Since a cop's end goal is ideally putting cuffs on someone who's fighting him -- many of the moves in DT aren't quite consistent with pure self defense, and are oriented on putting someone face down, with their hands behind their back.
 

bluekey88

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I have quite a bit of experience wirth this. Been working in the field for almost 14 years...I work for Devereux and we utilize Devreux's CPI (Crisis Prevention and Intervention) system. I am a trainer for this course as well.

As a trainer and clinician, I think the research and moves are generally sound...when utilized properly I;ve seen many, many situations that could have been really bad averted or prevented all together. The key to making these things work is in the non-physical intevrentions...

1.KNOW YOUR CLIENTS...know their triggers, know what's goign on in their lives, develop therpeutic relationships with them.

2. Communicate with your team members...knwo whatis goign on in the unit, use teamwork to proatively deal with situaitons and hopefully eliminate them before they occur.

3. Stay aware...don't work your shift on "auto-pilot."

As a martial artist, I kbnow that 99% of what I can do will get me fired (even with my Aikido training...cant; do anything that goes against a joint). We're de3qling with a sitaution where there are some rathe runique constraints. I am not allowed to hurt my clients (nor do i want to). I need toa void sending the mesage that "might makes right" so I can't just bully my clients into doing what I want....in the end, I need to be teaching my clients how to deal with their stress without engaging in challenging behaviors.

That being said, stuff happens. My clients are not contrained by a need to refrain from harming me.

I find that CPI and other similar systems do a better than adequate job of dealing with crisis situation and keepign client and staff safe...but they are far from perfect.

Peace,
Erik
2.
 
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foggymorning162

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Thanks everyone. To bluekey88 I found the psychological portion of the training to be very helpfull and I felt that it would be much more effective than any of the physical stuff. Although I haven't officially started yet I do have some helpfull background info on my client already and because she has behaviors she is a 2:1 line of sight case so I will always have back-up.
 

bluekey88

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2:1? Wowser! Well, good luck in your new job. I've found it to be quite a rewarding vocation...stressful, but rewarding. :)

I, too, find the psychological aspects of crisis intervention infinitely more useful than the physical interventions. Personally, I feel that when things get to"hands on", no matte rhow necesssary, there has been a treatment failure of some kind. Not that one should avoid doing what is necessary to keep everyone safe...but it's good then to look over what happened to see where that breakdown occurred and take steps to avoid future breakdowns.

Peace,
Erik
 
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