Oh no.. it can`t be THIS bad??

Kacey

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That one's been posted here before, under a different title, and I commented there (can't find it right now, though)... so no further comment seems necessary - I think you've all covered it anyway!
 

MBuzzy

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In all seriousness - is there any possibility that they were intending to be that fast? I mean, a time limit has mentioned....is there such a thing as a kata race or anything like that?

I mean, maybe I'm being naive, but could there be something else going on here?
 

MA-Caver

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Yes, it's just that they titled the film clip "A YMAS production". YMAS = Your Martial Art Sucks. That speaks volumes on their intent.

I happened to notice there were a number of youtube clips in this series by Bullshido. They took aim at TKD, Ninjitsu, Aikido, and others. I think they just look for the worst clips they can find and compile them together. I don't know if it's tongue-in-cheek, or if they really want to discredit these arts.
I watched a few of the others as well ... particularly the Aikido one... honestly speaking... while they inserted some NON-Aikido clips into it to boost it's satire/parody... of the actual aikido that was being shown/taught... what I saw was the real thing. Done slow and in practice the way it's supposed to be. So yeah, it'll look fake... to the untrained eye and I think that's what those guys on YMAS are... untrained (except by Hollywood) to know the difference between a real MA move and a wrong one.
 

Lynne

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I've only been training 10 weeks but I feel like a black belt now. I feel smooth and accomplished :mst:

All I could think of was, "Do they do house calls to kill wasps and mice?"

Oh, I didn't see any offensive or defensive stepping either :D Duh.
 
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Cirdan

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I actually couldn`t even laugh at this clip, I suddenly realized there are depths of mcdojoism I`ve been blissfully unaware of. Poor people, the only explanation for this is that their instructor got his dipoma off the internet without ever breaking sweat in a proper MA school. Now he picks up kata from watching video clips on the internet and pass them on to his students without the slightest understanding of the principles behind. Yes, they are being rushed but even so most yellow belts would move way better than this gang of stamping clowns. Now imagine each of those black belts opening their own schools. Groan! Most of them probably really knows better but are unable to face reality enough to leave the support group style club where their wannabe warrior martial artist egos are fed all kinds of oh so delicious BS.

Well I`m off to train, sweat and forget I ever saw this. Shugyo!
 

BrandiJo

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i hope this is some kind of joke.... or that there is something more to this then we haven't seen :( .
 

Flatlander

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I'm trying to imagine the purpose behind getting up in front of a group of people and doing such a demonstration. I'm also trying to imagine what the purpose behind learning to do such a group of movements might be. Interesting stuff. People manage to find some genuinely peculiar ways to spend their leisure time.....
 

Gentle Fist

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If I was one of the people in the crowd I would have demanded my money back!

Cool NES music though!!
 

bluemtn

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I've seen this once before somewhere... Still funny! Was it a dance, or a form?
 

Balrog

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Yes, it did look like they were scrambling, and technique was suffering measurably. Very bizzarre.

On the other hand, it looks like Bullshido.net had a specific agenda to look for clips that make people look bad.

Not "had": has.
 

Last Fearner

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Ok, I'm going to express a different perspective on this than others here. This might sound bizarre coming from a life-long dedicated instructor of the Martial Art, but I did not find this to be so outrageous, or "bad" Martial Art. Bear with me on this.

I have judged tournaments for decades, and I have seen some really, REALLY bad forms. Mostly lacking in power, eye focus, mental concentration, poor stances, and a bad memory of the pattern. A couple of decades back, I recall many tournaments adding a separate division of "free-forms" or "creative forms." Often times done to music, these patterns allowed the students (and/or their instructors who helped them) to break away from the traditionally "approved" forms, and display skills not normally seen in forms competition.

These forms included sky high kicks, back flips, landing in the splits, and all kinds of acrobatic stunts. The higher the kicks, and the more flips, the higher the score. Students who were "restrained" by basic kata/hyung were suddenly unleashed with moves not common in tournaments. I found it unsettling, but had to score them anyhow.

What I see here in this clip, appears to be a unique approach to demonstrating techniques in a "rapid fire," form-like presentation. I grant you that this looks wacky, but I believe that is because we are comparing this to traditional form philosophy, and how we believe "forms" should be done. These "appear" to be forms sped up, but I believe that this is an instructor's personal philosophy that a real-life fight is fast pace. I think what they are attempting to accomplish is more like "pre-arranged free-sparring."

People who criticize traditional forms often say that they do not resemble a real fight, but those who practice forms (in the traditional sense) argue that there are benefits extracted from form segments that are to be applied in a real fight. My question is, has the leadership of this group of students (or organization) chosen to completely abandon traditional, rhythmic forms for this type of "free-fighting form" (for lack of an official term), or is this a supplemental training method.

I believe this kind of training would promote sloppy technique, but if these students are taught to slow things down and be precise in other areas of their training, then this could be an example of how they feel a real fight would proceed - - no low fixed stances, mostly quick walking about, and rapid fire techniques in multiple directions. I can see where proponents of this methodology might argue that traditional forms are too slow pace, and have too many deep stances with deliberate techniques.

I can not determine from this clip if these students train in Reality-Based combat skills that might rival other systems. I have seen Monkey-style Kung-fu, and Drunken Master, and one might conclude that those were "bad" skills. I wouldn't ordinarily say that I would teach my students like the monkey style, or Drunken master, but in fact, I do know the benefits of those tactics. Decades ago, I competed in Open Tournaments using Chang Hon (General Choi's) forms against some Okinawan systems, and their forms looked ridiculous to me (no offense). We were often quite upset when those forms beat ours in the Karate/Kung-fu/Taekwondo tournaments (of course, it had to be biased judging!).

The movements in this clip do not resemble the forms that I know, but I'm not sure they were intended to. I am not surprised that they were not synchronized as it appears to be the nature of these rapid fighting forms, and it looked like the panel of elders (possibly Masters) were judging the performance. Much like Taekwondo tournaments where two or three competitors are doing the same Black Belt form at the same time, but they are not trying to be synchronized.

I just wonder if there is more substance to the rest of their training because this just looks like a unique "approach" to combing fast pace self defense, sparring-like moves, in a kata-like format. This particular portion of their training might not be a good representation of the over-all effectiveness of what they can do, and I don't see it as clearly a "bad" performance, just not like the forms I am accustomed to.

What do you think? Did anyone recognize the pattern here, or did this appear to be a system created specifically for what they were doing?

Interesting approach!
CM D.J. Eisenhart
 
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