New York Times 1913 self defence article

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Interesting, thanks for sharing.
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Bill Mattocks

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Sandstorm

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Here's a fun one from Google Books - an article from 1959 on Karate as taught in Arizona:

http://books.google.com/books?id=tt...brr=0&as_pt=MAGAZINES&ei=cqqQSeCvJ4HEMrLh3b8K
LOL!! Now THAT is a man's magazine. I love the advert for 'super jujitsu' on page 54. Nice Karate exposure also.

All issues of Black Belt are now online as well, courtesy of Google and Black Belt, which I think it pretty cool.

http://books.google.com/books?id=kN...&source=gbs_summary_s&cad=0#all_issues_anchor

I have browsed through many of the Black Belt mags. My uncle still has a box full I believe in his loft dating way back. Should give him a call and see if I can take another look at them actually.
 
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Sandstorm

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Haven't read the whole piece yet, but that was obviously in it's infancy, so Kano must have been something to do with the teachings there? I'll have a closer read tomorrow.
Thanks for these. Most interesting
 

elder999

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Thought this was quite interesting, if not, amusing...

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3133/2675252999_c3fd77a7f6_b.jpg

A.C. Cunningham's method of cane fighting was unique in a few interesting ways: it had several guard positions that were non-threatening traps, in that the cane was positioned lower than one would expect from a fencer, which Cunningham was. This not only served to entice an attacker, but makes it more difficult for one to grasp the weapon and wrest it away. You can see his entire book online, here.
 
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Sandstorm

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OBrien​
, John J.
A course in Jiu-Jitsu and
physical culture. Chicago: Self Preservation
League, (1912).
瞿350

8vo (230 155 mm), pp.[2], 118, [2]; 87 photographic
illustrations of jiu-jistu moves, 19 other illustrations
and 6 small sketches in text, plus frontispiece. Internally
fine. Publishers cloth, mustard-coloured, black lettering
to upper board, slightly soiled and rubbed at extremities
with signature to lower board. Previous owners stamp to
p.69, erased from front free endpaper and p.9; ownership
inscription to front free endpaper.​
Scarce. One of the earliest texts in English about
Japanese martial arts, a blow-by-blow illustrated
guide to unarmed combat. While porch-climbers
and other sneak thieves are reaping a goodly
harvest during the carnival of crime which is
now going on in Chicago, owing to the inability
of the police to effectively cope with existing
conditions, hold-up men and others of their
ilk who work on the public highways are on
the look-out for exponents of the dangerous
jiu-jitsu science, who are evidently able to
defend themselves against armed desperadoes.
Professor OBrien spent ten years as Inspector of
Police in Nagasaki, Japan; there, he learnt jiu-jitsu,
which he subsequently popularized in the United
States. A course of 27 illustrated lessons is given
here. It is followed by a brief excursus on physical
culture, aimed to counter the problematic effects
of modern life, which, while elevating the mind
to new heights, has left the body jeopardized by
physical exhaustion. OBrien played a formative
role in the American College of Physical Culture
and Jiu-Jitsu, which first published this work in
1905, and taught jiu-jitsu to President Theodore
Roosevelt (among others). The present copy was​
owned by Lieut. George Kilgore, 5th US Infantry.




The above excerpt taken from here......

http://www.simonfinch.com/content_repository/SFRB_cat63.pdf
 

frank raud

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OBrien​
, John J.
A course in Jiu-Jitsu and

physical culture. Chicago: Self Preservation
League, (1912).
瞿350
8vo (230 155 mm), pp.[2], 118, [2]; 87 photographic
illustrations of jiu-jistu moves, 19 other illustrations
and 6 small sketches in text, plus frontispiece. Internally
fine. Publishers cloth, mustard-coloured, black lettering
to upper board, slightly soiled and rubbed at extremities
with signature to lower board. Previous owners stamp to
p.69, erased from front free endpaper and p.9; ownership
inscription to front free endpaper.
Scarce. One of the earliest texts in English about
Japanese martial arts, a blow-by-blow illustrated
guide to unarmed combat. While porch-climbers
and other sneak thieves are reaping a goodly
harvest during the carnival of crime which is
now going on in Chicago, owing to the inability
of the police to effectively cope with existing
conditions, hold-up men and others of their
ilk who work on the public highways are on
the look-out for exponents of the dangerous
jiu-jitsu science, who are evidently able to
defend themselves against armed desperadoes.
Professor OBrien spent ten years as Inspector of
Police in Nagasaki, Japan; there, he learnt jiu-jitsu,
which he subsequently popularized in the United
States. A course of 27 illustrated lessons is given
here. It is followed by a brief excursus on physical
culture, aimed to counter the problematic effects
of modern life, which, while elevating the mind
to new heights, has left the body jeopardized by
physical exhaustion. OBrien played a formative
role in the American College of Physical Culture
and Jiu-Jitsu, which first published this work in
1905, and taught jiu-jitsu to President Theodore
Roosevelt (among others). The present copy was

owned by Lieut. George Kilgore, 5th US Infantry.




The above excerpt taken from here......

http://www.simonfinch.com/content_repository/SFRB_cat63.pdf
I have an autograghed copy of this book, along with some interesting advertising for O'Brien's school.
 

Hagakure

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Here's a fun one from Google Books - an article from 1959 on Karate as taught in Arizona:

http://books.google.com/books?id=tt...brr=0&as_pt=MAGAZINES&ei=cqqQSeCvJ4HEMrLh3b8K

All issues of Black Belt are now online as well, courtesy of Google and Black Belt, which I think it pretty cool.

http://books.google.com/books?id=kN...&source=gbs_summary_s&cad=0#all_issues_anchor

From the article about Karate in July '59.

"Karate is about 5000 years old created by Prince Daruma?" :D Erm...
 

Bill Mattocks

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Here is another - the British understanding of what appears to be Kung Fu, from the 1830's...

THE ASIATIC JOURNAL MONTHLY REGISTER
BRITISH AND FOREIGN INDIA, CHINA, AND AUSTRALASIA.
VOL. 1.NEW SERIES.
JANUARYAPRIL, 1830.
LONDON:
P A R B U R Y, ALLEN, AND CO.,
LEADENHALL STREET.
1830.

Page 326

Pugilism in China.The art of self-defense is regularly taught in China. It is much practiced, although not countenanced by the local governments. In the penal code, nothing appears concerning it. Tracts are printed which would, in all probability, accompanied by their wood-cuts, amuse the fancy in England. The Chinese have no pitched battles that we ever heard of; but we have seen a pamphlet on the subject of boxing, cudgeling, and sword- exercise, in which there are many fanciful terms.

The first lesson, for a Chinese boxer, consists of winding his long tail tight round his head, stripping himself to the buff, then placing his right foot foremost, and with all his might giving a heavy thrust with his right fist against a bag suspended for the purpose. He is directed to change hands and feet alternately, restraining his breath and boxing the bag of sand right and left, for hours together. This exercise the fancy call "thumping down walls and overturning parapets."

In the second lesson, the pugilist grasps in each hand a "stone lock," (a heavy mass of stone worked into the form of a Chinese lock). Then, being stripped and tail arranged as before, he practices thrusting out at arm's length these weights, right and left, till he is tired. He is to change feet and hands at the same time. This lesson is called "a golden dragon thrusting out his claws."

Next comes "a crow stretching his wings
a dragon issuing forth from his den
a drunken Chinaman knocking at your door
a sphinx spreading her wings
a hungry tiger seizing a lamb
a hawk clawing a sparrow
a crane and a muscle reciprocally embarrassed,"

with various other specimens or fanciful nomenclature for diverse feats of the pugilistic art.

Canton Reg., June 18.
 

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