Maybe once more?

EdwardA

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Hello guys,

I took part in this forum a bit more than two years ago, and I left. I left because you couldn't get thru a thread without somebody bringing politics into it. Yeah admittedly, I'd get sucked into it too, so I was at fault also. So I quit using this forum. My intention from the beginning and now, is to impart some of the most important things I learned from 50 years of training....I was trained specifically for street fighting and the techniques i learned from my instructor and what I picked up along the way proved to save my life on many occasion and kept me from injury. I hope some of what I learned will be helpful to a few.
 
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EdwardA

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Hmm, apparently you can't post a blog without an attachment. That kinda leaves me out.
 

Buka

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Welcome back, EdwardA.
 
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EdwardA

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A difference between blog entry and blog detail? A bit confusing and I still had to upload an attachment.
 

Holmejr

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Welcome back!
specifically for street fighting
What would that be?
 
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EdwardA

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Welcome back!
specifically for street fighting
What would that be?
What that would be? What I was trained for. Not tournaments or contests, fighting on the street was more than expected it was demanded of me, by my instuctor. First thing he taught me was tumbling and falling on parking lot asphault, no mats, but he only trained me that way, not other students. His training of me was for my natural abilities. At 14, I had already done lots of crazy stuff anyway including a lot of fighting, so I didn't see anything unusual about it. I found it helpful.

I think in some instances, Asains train rougher than in a typical American school. He used to beat me with a pair of sticks during a standing meditation, many times, until i learned to let the energy go thru me...an example. I enjoyed it. It became relaxing.
 
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Monkey Turned Wolf

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A difference between blog entry and blog detail? A bit confusing and I still had to upload an attachment.
Went to the blogs and it looks like you figured it out. I get what you mean by attachment now though..when you make a blog, there needs to be an image thumbnail next to it. Normally either your profile pic (so people can quickly recognize it as yours) or something related to the post itself.
 

drop bear

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What that would be? What I was trained for. Not tournaments or contests, fighting on the street was more than expected it was demanded of me, by my instuctor. First thing he taught me was tumbling and falling on parking lot asphault, no mats, but he only trained me that way, not other students. His training of me was for my natural abilities. At 14, I had already done lots of crazy stuff anyway including a lot of fighting, so I didn't see anything unusual about it. I found it helpful.

I think in some instances, Asains train rougher than in a typical American school. He used to beat me with a pair of sticks during a standing meditation, many times, until i learned to let the energy go thru me...an example. I enjoyed it. It became relaxing.

Honestly I never liked the back of hand martial arts roll.

For the street. This is the roll.

And basically if you have been involuntarily pitched hard head first at the ground you need those hands to align your body properly.

And why parkour on hard surfaces doing high amplitude falls go that route.

That is the streets.
 
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EdwardA

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No, I'd say the "streets" are actually defending yourself against 3 weapon wielding gang bangers, like is going on in most cities every day.

Reality, not theory. Situations I had to deal with, a few times.

A tactic I discovered that they use on purpose. If you think your fighting 2, your making a big mistake. One hangs back to sneak in on your back side. That situation requires speed and agility.

That's the streets. That's what I was trained for.
 
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drop bear

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No, I'd say the "streets" are actually defending yourself against 3 weapon wielding gang bangers, like is going on in most cities every day.

Reality, not theory. Situations I had to deal with, a few times.

A tactic I discovered that they use on purpose. If you think your fighting 2, your making a big mistake. One hangs back to sneak in on your back side. That situation requires speed and agility.

That's the streets. That's what I was trained for.

I was chased around a shopping centre carpark by a thief with a bow and arrow once.

But that was only one weapon welding guy his misses and their 8 year old child.

Here is a street tactic. If you are going to hold someone down who just tried to kill you on a hard surface. Kasegetami will prevent your knees getting all scraped to bits.

Also if you are going to sneak off as soon as the cops arrive. Don't be wearing a club T shirt.

The streets.
 

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Honestly I never liked the back of hand martial arts roll.

For the street. This is the roll.

And basically if you have been involuntarily pitched hard head first at the ground you need those hands to align your body properly.

And why parkour on hard surfaces doing high amplitude falls go that route.

That is the streets.
I think the rolls used in many arts are compromises, because they're what we use in the dojo, when someone is holding that other arm until the last second, and we're using the roll as an escape from a technique (rather than a face-plant or over-torqued arm). So it's one-handed. Not at all ideal for situations where you have the other arm. I wish I'd trained both.
 
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EdwardA

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I was chased around a shopping centre carpark by a thief with a bow and arrow once.

But that was only one weapon welding guy his misses and their 8 year old child.

Here is a street tactic. If you are going to hold someone down who just tried to kill you on a hard surface. Kasegetami will prevent your knees getting all scraped to bits.

Also if you are going to sneak off as soon as the cops arrive. Don't be wearing a club T shirt.

The streets.
I would never hold somebody down that was a threat. I dissable them so that's not needed. The only time I show mercy is when somebody attacks and I only have to block a few punches. They stop, look at me weird and go away. Im really talking about a dangerous situation that's very deadly. I've never killed anybody, but have seriuosly maimed them to end any threat... especially when there's more than one opponent with weapons. I did train with various weapons, but only fight with "empty hand". I kind of always felt people that come after me with weapons deserve whatever it takes to neutralize them...as fast as possible.

I starting to think you're just playing and not considering the subject seriously. That's ok, but i won't respond further.

Go look at my about page and you'll see where I'm coming from.
 
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Holmejr

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What that would be? What I was trained for. Not tournaments or contests, fighting on the street was more than expected it was demanded of me, by my instuctor. First thing he taught me was tumbling and falling on parking lot asphault, no mats, but he only trained me that way, not other students. His training of me was for my natural abilities. At 14, I had already done lots of crazy stuff anyway including a lot of fighting, so I didn't see anything unusual about it. I found it helpful.

I think in some instances, Asains train rougher than in a typical American school. He used to beat me with a pair of sticks during a standing meditation, many times, until i learned to let the energy go thru me...an example. I enjoyed it. It became relaxing.
For a long time we practiced on the top floor of a parking structure. We had to tumble on the asphalt there. Wed get thrown, have to tumble, get up and defend against random open hand and weapon attacks, then repeat. Very challenging.

At the original JKD classes at the Kali Academy we did a lot of multi person sparring. 1 vs 2 or 3, 2 vs 2, 4 vs 4. Very enlightening. I might be wrong and correct me if I am, but I dont think they train like this any more.

Eskrido De Alcuizar
World Eskrido Federation
Buena Park, CA
 
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EdwardA

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For a long time we practiced on the top floor of a parking structure. We had to tumble on the asphalt there. Wed get thrown, have to tumble, get up and defend against random open hand and weapon attacks, then repeat. Very challenging.

At the original JKD classes at the Kali Academy we did a lot of multi person sparring. 1 vs 2 or 3, 2 vs 2, 4 vs 4. Very enlightening. I might be wrong and correct me if I am, but I dont think they train like this any more.

Eskrido De Alcuizar
World Eskrido Federation
Buena Park, CA
It's been a while since I knew how anybody else trains. The biggest benefit I ever saw from tumbling on street surfaces were during a couple severe motorcycle crashes, where I should've been killed or crippled, but came out with only a few minor bruises. There was something else I saw real clearly for the first time during those crashes that was far more important than falling on hard surfaces.

I'll explain in my next post what I saw.
 
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EdwardA

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During extreme traumatic cercumstances...a motorcycle crash is a good example, for me, just before impact, time just slows down and stops for a short moment. In that short moment I discovered I can do things. I think it's part of natural human potential, but I had been using some mental training techniques to increase my effectiveness in that area of consciousness. The outcome in that paticular crash, was just before impact, while holding onto the handlebars, threw my legs upward like a handstand. Gee, it was a truck that without warning hit his brakes to turn left.... right as I started to pass. He was doing 5 to 7mph, I was doing 65 directly into his tailgate. I flew at least 60-70 feet and came to a stop on my hands and knees with barely a bruise.

I learned I can put myself into that place during fights that are extremely threatening. When everything else slows down except me. Instead of going into some lengthy explanation of what that area of consciousness is, I'll just say it's in between. Many people that've experienced very traumatic situations have seen it.
 
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drop bear

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I think the rolls used in many arts are compromises, because they're what we use in the dojo, when someone is holding that other arm until the last second, and we're using the roll as an escape from a technique (rather than a face-plant or over-torqued arm). So it's one-handed. Not at all ideal for situations where you have the other arm. I wish I'd trained both.

I do agree with the sexy no handed roll for that reason.

Which a quick look at youtube suggests everyone goes over the head gymnast style. Which I don't do.
 

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