Long term training in Thailand

BenPedro

White Belt
Joined
May 5, 2009
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
I've been looking for a Muay Thai camp in Thailand and I was thinking about staying for a year or so.
Most of the camp's I have found only seem to advertise up to a month.
If anyone has any reccomendations that would be great.
 

Akira

Green Belt
Joined
Jan 30, 2009
Messages
181
Reaction score
2
Location
Bangkok
What?

Have you actually tried talking to some of the camp owners? True, the prices advertised are month by month but why on earth would they mind if you want to stay longer? Most people at my gym stay 1 - 3 months at a time.
 
OP
B

BenPedro

White Belt
Joined
May 5, 2009
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Any suggestions on gym's or camp's that have more 'long term' student's would be great thanks
 

Akira

Green Belt
Joined
Jan 30, 2009
Messages
181
Reaction score
2
Location
Bangkok
All of them? I don't understand the nature of your enquiry exactly. Are you wanting to stay with the same group of people or wanting a long term rate or what?

Most gyms here will have mostly people who are passing through, staying 2 weeks to 1 month with a small handful staying longer. The gym I'm at (Sasiprapa) is made up of some thais who have been there for years, a lot of people who are staying 2 weeks to 1 month, and about 3 people who are staying one year or longer (myself included). I think you'll find it's a similar demographic at most gyms/camps.
 

blackdiamondcobra

Purple Belt
Joined
Jul 27, 2002
Messages
322
Reaction score
24
Location
NYC/BKK
You can stay as long as you want if you pay the fees for the month, month after month. Are you planning on fighting in thailand or there just to train and learn?

Best bet is to go around to camps and see if you can find one that is mostly not catering to foreigners. If you can get accepted there you can stay the whole year for very little.

I lived and trained at my camp for 1 year at various intervals without much expense but I chose during the second half to get an apartment a few blocks away so I could sleep well at night.

Alot of variables to check into.
 
OP
B

BenPedro

White Belt
Joined
May 5, 2009
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Yeah I've had about 5 years experience and a few fight's but i'm looking to take my training further fighting and training over in Thailand.

I guess what i'm looking for is just some general advice in trying to avoid the 'tourist trap's' and thing's like that-like you said, or/and suggestions on good gym's. I'll travel out of the way for quality.

I suppose I'll just have to shop around!

Thank's for your help.
 

blackdiamondcobra

Purple Belt
Joined
Jul 27, 2002
Messages
322
Reaction score
24
Location
NYC/BKK
In the meantime, probably try to learn some basic thai, which will help alot.

Get your visa situation together so its minimal hassle staying for the year or workout your method for staying, there are many blogs on staying in thailand, since in recent years the amount of foreigners going to train is pretty staggering and it resulted in alot of camps really being foreigner friendly for the money.

But there are alot of camps throughout thailand especially in bangkok, some of really great but unknown really to foreigners because they dont really follow the scene and know where alot of the great fighters are training. You can go to fights and go backstage and meet fighters and trainers, go to the muay thai shops and befriend the owners because they know all the camps and maybe can recommend one, alot of ways if you know how to work with people.

If you train in a camp with few if any foreigners you might not even have to pay anything or pay very much but i did pay my trainers on the side something, bought shirts for the fighters as gifts and stuff for the camp, bought meals, water. Pitch in always and be part of the camp like you belong and pay attention to the ajarn.

One important thing is try to follow along and absorb as much as you can, foreigners tend to disrupt the flow with endless questions and disruptions, they train fighters on a daily basis for years and through the small increments building you piece by piece they will get you there. Its not that you dont ask questions and have problems, but they see it and they will correct you and build you up, if you stay with them. Its another culture so do your best to adapt and you will learn alot. Usually after the training you can pull fighters aside or usually they come over and immediately help, its amazing, how preceptive there are to you since they work with you day after day.

Train hard and have fun. Its a wonderful place to train.
 

Franc0

Purple Belt
Joined
Jul 3, 2003
Messages
334
Reaction score
18
Location
Las Vegas, NV. USA
Two large training camps in Thailand are the Fairtex camp, and Master Toddys newly built camp. I would go to one of these two for the fact that there would be Americans there to mingle/train with.

Franco
 

denmyos

Orange Belt
Joined
Oct 29, 2008
Messages
62
Reaction score
1
Two large training camps in Thailand are the Fairtex camp, and Master Toddys newly built camp. I would go to one of these two for the fact that there would be Americans there to mingle/train with.

Franco

What would the point be in going to thailand and train with americans?
 

blackdiamondcobra

Purple Belt
Joined
Jul 27, 2002
Messages
322
Reaction score
24
Location
NYC/BKK
Well, some people feel more comfortable around other americans/europeans, etc they can hang with and talk to in a camp environment. I think thats acceptable and nothing wrong with that. Some people actually go to the bigger camps with foreigners, etc train a bit, get the hang of the routine, get used to being in thailand, then move onto to a camp with little to no foreigners. Its up to each persons comfort level, training purposes, length of time in thailand and goals.

I always perferred personally just being in my camp which has no foreigners outside of one maybe here and there because its down to serious business, total concentration, living the life like they live it and showing that dedication to the camp trainers and other fighters really gets you the first layer of respect that allows you to learn, train and fight equally at all times with them.

Its a matter of choice and luckily now with foreigner friendly camps one can go to a camp like that if they want to when I first started training in thailand, it wasnt like that, and they were really, really, really hard on you the first month to see if they could break you and if you could hang in there with them. Those early years were hard but I learned so much it was simply overwhelming and i wouldnt trade that experience for anything in the world.
 

DeadlyShins

Yellow Belt
Joined
Feb 28, 2009
Messages
51
Reaction score
0
Location
Shelton, CT
Go check out one of the bigger gyms first to get used to the climate and atmosphere (like Fairtex or Toddy's), then maybe look into smaller local gyms or more "Thai" gyms where there are less American influences and amenities.
 
Top