Leopard Kung Fu

Oily Dragon

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There were very few leopard techniques in the CLF lines as directly named "Leopard does anything". Leopard in my experience in CLF is more an attribute to physical activity/techniques/energy rather than actual mimetic or "inspired" techniques. I'm sure there are some lines that specifically work on getting the names and breakdowns in, but not a game breaking thing for what I learned.

Chaap Choi is probably the absolute best known "Leopard" technique in CLF. It means Stabbing punch and has little to zero in relation to the hand shape. Instead it is all about the energy of the technique, delivered and intended. A leopard isn't a big cat compared to Tiger in CLF or other Southern Shaolin styles. It can't/doesn't pounce and maul like that cat. It's fast and hits hard and often versus a one shot kick of strike. It has a squared shaped paw with underslung claws compared to a tigers flat paw and forward extruding claws. It approaches things from a different mindset.
Leopard styles are a lot older than CLF, so naturally CLF is a distillation. 3 family styles, at least a couple of those had techniques in the curriculum classed as "Leopard".

Though there is one exception. One style replaces Dragon Snake Tiger Leopard Crane, with Dragon Snake Tiger Panther Crane.

It's Hay Sa Fu. A form of Hung Kuen that is not Hung Ga Kuen, but contributed to it.

Still can't find my Wing Lam book but the wiki..

 
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CMyers0323

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There were very few leopard techniques in the CLF lines as directly named "Leopard does anything". Leopard in my experience in CLF is more an attribute to physical activity/techniques/energy rather than actual mimetic or "inspired" techniques. I'm sure there are some lines that specifically work on getting the names and breakdowns in, but not a game breaking thing for what I learned.

Chaap Choi is probably the absolute best known "Leopard" technique in CLF. It means Stabbing punch and has little to zero in relation to the hand shape. Instead it is all about the energy of the technique, delivered and intended. A leopard isn't a big cat compared to Tiger in CLF or other Southern Shaolin styles. It can't/doesn't pounce and maul like that cat. It's fast and hits hard and often versus a one shot kick of strike. It has a squared shaped paw with underslung claws compared to a tigers flat paw and forward extruding claws. It approaches things from a different mindset.
That's probably why it's "hard to find" as well. That's honestly great because with my Study of Xing Yi and the Animal styles yes the techniques and forms are important but the energy as you've put it is what I've been primarily studying as well. I've got a list of things to practice involving that haha. I just figured gathering the info would be a good way to learn more about the style.

I see that sounds very interesting. I'm not sure if I've heard of it a search should pull up the same results right? Like for Wing Chun bong sao is a pretty easy technique to google and only see images of that. That makes sense. I've been hearing various concepts of the leopard which probably is just based off different "lineages" of it.
 
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CMyers0323

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I'm torn.

There's some risk involved, obviously. To me.
Yeah I see what your saying i wouldn't want to force you to share it. You and anyone else is more than welcome to join the group regardless if you share or not but I did ask and they said it was fine to share the book. I think that's the same page I got the book essence of internal Martial arts vol 1/2 which apparently is a expensive book not sure about copy right on it
 
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CMyers0323

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Leopard styles are a lot older than CLF, so naturally CLF is a distillation. 3 family styles, at least a couple of those had techniques in the curriculum classed as "Leopard".

Though there is one exception. One style replaces Dragon Snake Tiger Leopard Crane, with Dragon Snake Tiger Panther Crane.

It's Hay Sa Fu. A form of Hung Kuen that is not Hung Ga Kuen, but contributed to it.

Still can't find my Wing Lam book but the wiki..

Very cool info. It makes sense since it's one of the original animal styles. I wonder if some where there's more info even if its just written if not it may have been some what lost or mixed in so well. I suppose that's why the essence and energy of the style may be a great thing at best
 
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CMyers0323

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Leopard styles are a lot older than CLF, so naturally CLF is a distillation. 3 family styles, at least a couple of those had techniques in the curriculum classed as "Leopard".

Though there is one exception. One style replaces Dragon Snake Tiger Leopard Crane, with Dragon Snake Tiger Panther Crane.

It's Hay Sa Fu. A form of Hung Kuen that is not Hung Ga Kuen, but contributed to it.

Still can't find my Wing Lam book but the wiki..

Oh whats your thoughts on the techniques and form I had posted? The form is a 5 animal form I can't remember if they said CLF or another style almost sure it was CLF though
 
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CMyers0323

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Sorry I missed it.

You've got the right idea but the wrong baoquan.

Believe it or not somebody make a better Wiki page.

I see thanks for sharing the page. The techniques seem to be some what CLF and some with the Leopard concept of raking and clawing. I did get another one a kick its basically like the scraping Kick from wing chun done this one is to the abdomen. It's mean to be like when cats kick at you or something lol. The form seems to be a short set from a longer animal form
 

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I see thanks for sharing the page. The techniques seem to be some what CLF and some with the Leopard concept of raking and clawing. I did get another one a kick its basically like the scraping Kick from wing chun done this one is to the abdomen. It's mean to be like when cats kick at you or something lol. The form seems to be a short set from a longer animal form
Don't forget Chuka Shaolin, which is kind of related to Leopard shaped fists.

"Wrapping the index and middle fingers.". Mmm.
 
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CMyers0323

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Don't forget Chuka Shaolin, which is kind of related to Leopard shaped fists.

"Wrapping the index and middle fingers.". Mmm.
Oh very true. It's odd because I attributed the pheonix to the Fire element but that's always been a more long range type of combat. This book I have works on short power. It's a pretty cool book. I haven't had the chance to fully read it though
 

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Don't forget Chuka Shaolin, which is kind of related to Leopard shaped fists.

"Wrapping the index and middle fingers.". Mmm.
Squeezing Taters per Sifu Manny ... hehehehe

Ginger fist though. It's the primary shape of the fist for striking in my Ma Family Tongbei Quan.
 
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CMyers0323

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How/what does the Leopard style and other animals differ or follow principles/theory? In Wing Chun they are more clearly layed out like centerline theory and the others?
 

Oily Dragon

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How/what does the Leopard style and other animals differ or follow principles/theory? In Wing Chun they are more clearly layed out like centerline theory and the others?
Wing Chun has a kind of overlap with several related styles in the Five Animal traditions and other local styles, minus specific things (or maybe not depending on your sifus background).

Most Wing Chun contains Snake, Crane, and Dragon stuff found in other styles from the same region. The Yee Gi stance is southern Crane, the biu ji is snake, etc.

Tiger and Leopard not so much, I've personally never seen the baoquan shaped fist in Wing Chun anywhere. Or Fu jow tiger claws. They generally keep to the old Sun character normal fist. There is grabbing, wristing etc. Whether the WC dudes know it's southern Dragon or whatever, who knows.

I hate the term "centerline theory". It's not a theory. But technically all the Five Animal sequences use it. Most techniques operate on that, only a few are what I would consider exotic.
 

Oily Dragon

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Found a really good Ha Say Fu Hung Kuen vid of Leopard techniques. This might even be improvised.

*The Hung Kuen demonstrated here is from Maoming, although the Upper Five Shapes, demonstrated by a group from the Maonan district, is from a different lineage than the Lower Five Shapes, which are demonstrated by Lei Cheung Tim of Gaozhou county.

Now see? That's a helpful little asterisk. I have a hard time keeping just 5 Animals straight, let alone 10.

It's hard to see his fists here but this is the right spirit.

 

punisher73

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Jow Ga(r) also has leopard in its forms.

Starting at 1:12, it shows the Tiger/Leopard Form.
 
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CMyers0323

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Wing Chun has a kind of overlap with several related styles in the Five Animal traditions and other local styles, minus specific things (or maybe not depending on your sifus background).

Most Wing Chun contains Snake, Crane, and Dragon stuff found in other styles from the same region. The Yee Gi stance is southern Crane, the biu ji is snake, etc.

Tiger and Leopard not so much, I've personally never seen the baoquan shaped fist in Wing Chun anywhere. Or Fu jow tiger claws. They generally keep to the old Sun character normal fist. There is grabbing, wristing etc. Whether the WC dudes know it's southern Dragon or whatever, who knows.

I hate the term "centerline theory". It's not a theory. But technically all the Five Animal sequences use it. Most techniques operate on that, only a few are what I would consider exotic.
I see that makes sense I've seen some things plus I tend to hear them teaching some animal style techniques. For my Sifu it does overlap a bit but we tend to blend the styles while we will do Bagua on a day when doing some techniques they aren't limited to one style or another.

Yeah I see what your saying thanks for the info. It's interesting to see the origin of these things.

Yeah haha I get that. Just an example i thought of but that does make sense they all use it. I just wasn't sure if they had any specific "theories" or similar like how Wing Chun is known for that concept
 
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CMyers0323

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Found a really good Ha Say Fu Hung Kuen vid of Leopard techniques. This might even be improvised.

*The Hung Kuen demonstrated here is from Maoming, although the Upper Five Shapes, demonstrated by a group from the Maonan district, is from a different lineage than the Lower Five Shapes, which are demonstrated by Lei Cheung Tim of Gaozhou county.

Now see? That's a helpful little asterisk. I have a hard time keeping just 5 Animals straight, let alone 10.

It's hard to see his fists here but this is the right spirit.

I'll definitely watch it! Thanks for putting this here
 
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