Kata with hand weights

G

George Martin

Guest
Are there any advantages/disadvantages to using light hand weights (1 1/2 lbs) when doing kata?
 
Uechi-ryu uses oversized jars as hand weights but more for grip strengthening and overall conditioning than as part of the kata per se.

Wrist weights with velcro might be better as you don't have to hold them, limiting your hand position.
 
disadvantages may include wear and tear on your tendons and possible medical problems in the future.

Torn muscles may occure if the arm moments are not correct simply because the muscles are not used to the extra weight .

You may also find yourslef doing the Kata in a incorrect way because the extra weight is causeing you to move differently.
 
I use light hand weights sometimes when I'm training but there is a piece of advice to go with the drill. Don't use heavy weights and DON'T do the moves to full extension. This will sav wear and tear on your joints
 
Occasionally I use ankle weights on my wrists and use what is known as tetsugeta (iron clogs) on my feet while doing kata. I slow down the movements to some degree to avoid tendon damage.

It is good exercise and a nice change of feeling from doing kata the same way all the time.
 
If I may add my two cents,
Not many Ueichi ryu schools use the jars. Most dojos that teach students to use the jars for roughly five years. Even then the student is closely monitored by the sensei.
At least this has been my expereience in this style.

sorry to bother you all.
 
I trained using wrist and ankle weights for a brief time when I was trying to build my speed and and stamina to be ready for a martial arts camp in New York in the summer. It worked pretty well.

The advice I have to give in this matter has already been given, but I'll say it anyways: 1) Start slow with light weights, and take it easy on your poor tendons; 2) Using weights will definitely affect your equilibrium when you're unweighted, so be sure to practice without the weights as well.
 
Originally posted by angrywhitepajamas
Not many Ueichi ryu schools use the jars. Most dojos that teach students to use the jars for roughly five years.

Why 5 years?
 
Thats partially to adjust the hands. Then get the tiger claw into a proper form. Then the final reason is to make sure that you are serious about learning due to the fact that this is a excercise that is intruduced at the dan level. At that point you are a serious beginer in the arts.

Thank you for asking.

If any one has additional questions on Ueichi practices I'll answer to the best of my ability.
 
Originally posted by angrywhitepajamas
..... Then the final reason is to make sure that you are serious about learning due to the fact that this is a excercise that is intruduced at the dan level. At that point you are a serious beginer in the arts.


Is that a California thing?
The reason I ask is becasue I have known Uechi & Goju people in Okinawa to start jar training from kyu ranks.
 
Originally posted by angrywhitepajamas
Then get the tiger claw into a proper form.

I studied Uechi briefly in Rhode Island many years back and always liked it. In fact, I like the phoenix eye fist systems in general, though I don't practice one.

How is one to maintain the Tiger Claw strength after jar training?
 
Originally posted by George Martin
Are there any advantages/disadvantages to using light hand weights (1 1/2 lbs) when doing kata?

Make sure you are well warmed up b4 you start. Last year I was playing a boxing video game where you hold some handles (similar to light weights) attached to the machine by wires and actually bob and weave and punch. Ten seconds in I tore my tricep, not badly but it still inhibited my training for a few weeks.

Also be careful the weights are not too heavy as they will work the wrong muscle groups. Those being the ones which hold up the weight rather than the ones used to perform the technique. This will also happen if you perform the kata until you are fatigued.

This is only advice if you really want to do it. I would actually say I honestly don't think it would make much difference to the power of the technique and if your doing it to trim up there are far better ways.

Cheers
Sammy
 
Originally posted by sammy3170
I would actually say I honestly don't think it would make much difference to the power of the technique and if your doing it to trim up there are far better ways.

Using the weights may not help the power of your technique a whole lot, but if done properly it will certainly build your speed and stamina.
 
The dojo I train at in particular does not have them simply because we are a youth center and have to share the facility. The other reason I believe is for liability reasons. We have enough problems with the other patrons messing with our punching bag (imagine what would happen if they tried to pick it up and dropped it on them selves). But through out the other schools that I have visited, its roughly the same amount of time. Most of these senseis are teaching in their spare time and out of their own pockets. And the for profit dojos want to see if you will put in the time and dedication before they purchase jars that will take up space on the floor and cost about the same as a good punching bag (multi functioning). And as for the tiger claw, when we hit with it we are supposed to grasp the target after impact. The idea is to go almost for a chin na musclse splitting technique. Imagine the grip after the jar training.

The senseis sometimes have the jars at their homes but I myself would prefer not to bother the senseis any more than I do.

hope this helps, and sorry to take up your band width.
 
As far as I know Hojo-Undo [supplimentary training] forms a part of many styles of karate training from Okinawa.

I train in and teach goju-ryu and teach my students how to use all the tools incuding gami [jars] from early on. There are many other tools that will enhance the grip, like the chi-ishi [strength stone] and the ishi-sashi [stone padlock].

I would say that training with weights does help condition the body for karate. It also helps to condition the mind, and that's the really important bit.

Mike.
 
Originally posted by RyuShiKan
Occasionally I use ankle weights on my wrists
Surely weights on your wrists are called wrist weights, and weights on your ankle are called ankle weights? Or do you also get headaches in your stomach?
---
Now I've got that out of the way... :soapbox:
...I'd like to start by saying that I'm wearing wrist and ankle weights as I type this. Practicing kihon moves with the weights is great for building speed (snap reaction) with power, once the weights come off.
I don't see that practicing kata would be impeded by wearing weights, so long as you were mindful of the extra weight when extending punches, for example. And when you take the weights off, it feels like you've just arrived from a heavy gravity world. I recommend using weights.
Best,
 
Originally posted by angrywhitepajamas
The dojo I train at in particular does not have them simply because we are a youth center and have to share the facility. The other reason I believe is for liability reasons. We have enough problems with the other patrons messing with our punching bag (imagine what would happen if they tried to pick it up and dropped it on them selves).
This problem I understand perfectly from my time as the captain of Brixton Shorinji Kempo dojo in London. We even purchased a lockable cage to store our training equipment, and somebody tried to break into it, so in the end, we took the equipment home. I used to hump two do, two hand-held punching bags, and a bo, in addition to my own training kit and the membership register and paper files to and from every class. Here's what I'd like to do to the selfish miscreants who tried to jemmy open our cage:
:flame:
 
i used light weights periodically during kata and it helped my power.
I was careful to use slow motions and not to snap my tecniques, and i didn't do it every day. moderation worked for me.
 
If I remember correctly, wrist/ankle weights worn while punching/kicking can (will) cause overextension of the joints/tendons.

Whether you practice a sword art or not, a VERY good way to strenthen the forearms is with the use of a HEAVY suburi bokken.

Enjoy,

Scott
 

Latest Discussions

Back
Top