"Karate-Do Kyohan" by Funakoshi VS "Best Karate, Vol.1: Comprehensive" by Nakayama?

fishnaked

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Hello,

First time poster here. I have recently taken up Shotokan Karate. My teacher is affiliated with with Shotokan Karate of America and teaches that of which is in Gichin Funakoshi's book "Karate-Do Kyonhan".

I purchased the book to supplement the classes. The book has been very helpful. However, I'm keen to own other supplemental books. Does "Best Karate, Vol.1: Comprehensive" by Nakayama have the same techniques as those found in Funakoshi's book? If not, could someone recommend a book that does show the same style/techniques?

Thanks,
Fish
 

dancingalone

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The Karate-Do Kyohan is actually relatively sparse on technique information - it's more of a kata manual in my opinion. Get Best Karate-Comprehensive if you want a short overview of classic Shotokan technique. Frankly, I prefer Dynamic Karate over Best Karate-Comprehensive, however. The photos are superior.
 
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fishnaked

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The Karate-Do Kyohan is actually relatively sparse on technique information - it's more of a kata manual in my opinion. Get Best Karate-Comprehensive if you want a short overview of classic Shotokan technique. Frankly, I prefer Dynamic Karate over Best Karate-Comprehensive, however. The photos are superior.

Thanks for the recommendation. Are Nakayama's techniques/style the same as those shown in Funakoshi's book? I don't want to get confused by trying to study differing styles/techniques. Thanks again.
 

dancingalone

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Thanks for the recommendation. Are Nakayama's techniques/style the same as those shown in Funakoshi's book? I don't want to get confused by trying to study differing styles/techniques. Thanks again.

Hmm, I am not sure how to answer your question, so I'll be a little long-winded.

Nakayama was the JKA head instructor. Both Ohshima and Kanazawa who appear in the pictures in the second edition Karate-Do Kyohan were considered junior to Nakayama, and I know for sure that Kanazawa took class from him. If you want classical 1960's JKA technique then the Best Karate series and Dynamic Karate book which list Nakayama as the author are the ones to look at.

There is also a much rarer first edition of the Kyohan that has actual pictures of Gichin Funakoshi demonstrating. (You can download a pdf of it freely from the Karate Museum in Hawaii.) His stances are noticeably higher than those shown in the second edition, and it's been somewhat fashionable in karate historian circles to try to delve back and research what kind of karate Funakoshi had learned from his teacher, Itosu.

You most likely have the second edition Kyohan and sure I think Nakayama's books are fine as a resource for Shotokan karate-ka even if it is somewhat dated now, given the inevitable influences from other arts that have crept in over the years.
 
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fishnaked

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Hmm, I am not sure how to answer your question, so I'll be a little long-winded.

Nakayama was the JKA head instructor. Both Ohshima and Kanazawa who appear in the pictures in the second edition Karate-Do Kyohan were considered junior to Nakayama, and I know for sure that Kanazawa took class from him. If you want classical 1960's JKA technique then the Best Karate series and Dynamic Karate book which list Nakayama as the author are the ones to look at.

There is also a much rarer first edition of the Kyohan that has actual pictures of Gichin Funakoshi demonstrating. (You can download a pdf of it freely from the Karate Museum in Hawaii.) His stances are noticeably higher than those shown in the second edition, and it's been somewhat fashionable in karate historian circles to try to delve back and research what kind of karate Funakoshi had learned from his teacher, Itosu.

You most likely have the second edition Kyohan and sure I think Nakayama's books are fine as a resource for Shotokan karate-ka even if it is somewhat dated now, given the inevitable influences from other arts that have crept in over the years.

Thanks for your reply.
 
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