Jukido jujitsu - Florida

FranciscoNegron

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Hi there,

As a judoka, I like to watch videos of other practitioners. I follow Jukido Jujutsu on social media. Sensei Rego seems to have a lot of knowledge. Looks like they go hard on randori and self defense. Anyone has any experience training there? Near Daytona Beach I believe.
 

frank raud

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Hi there,

As a judoka, I like to watch videos of other practitioners. I follow Jukido Jujutsu on social media. Sensei Rego seems to have a lot of knowledge. Looks like they go hard on randori and self defense. Anyone has any experience training there? Near Daytona Beach I believe.
I have not had the opportunity to train with Sensei Rego, but all my interactions with him, the videos of his club that he has posted and reading his excellent book show a dedicated instructor with a depth of knowledge.
 

Chris Parker

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I have a number of reservations regarding the history presented... the judo is likely solid, as is the karate aspect, but the rest is... highly questionable. When it comes to heavy on randori and self defence, that's a personal preference... self defence as an approach is fraught with varying levels of understanding and education, but if you enjoy it, go for it.
 

Oily Dragon

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I have a number of reservations regarding the history presented... the judo is likely solid, as is the karate aspect, but the rest is... highly questionable. When it comes to heavy on randori and self defence, that's a personal preference... self defence as an approach is fraught with varying levels of understanding and education, but if you enjoy it, go for it.
It's all about the highlight reel.

1700637780288.png
 

Oily Dragon

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First and foremost kudos to these guys for wearing masks to prevent the spread of disease.

Did they really have to use "ju" three times?
 

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WhiteBeltNoStripe

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I have a number of reservations regarding the history presented... the judo is likely solid, as is the karate aspect, but the rest is... highly questionable. When it comes to heavy on randori and self defence, that's a personal preference... self defence as an approach is fraught with varying levels of understanding and education, but if you enjoy it, go for it.
I don't see what is highly questionable. The history details his teacher/founder and that's it. All I know is from what I've seen in the videos he posts on YouTube and my interactions with him I'm highly impressed.

YouTube.com/@jukidoacademy
 

Chris Parker

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I don't see what is highly questionable. The history details his teacher/founder and that's it. All I know is from what I've seen in the videos he posts on YouTube and my interactions with him I'm highly impressed.

YouTube.com/@jukidoacademy

Yeah, and that's where the issues and red flags are... the history as presented.

The system is claimed to be founded by one Paul Arel, who the blurbs constantly describe as "legendary", "world renowned", "the internationally highest authority in (their own martial arts)", and so on. What is noted is that he is seemingly only "legendary" and an authority in the martial arts he created... okay, not completely unusual to get some hyperbole there... but it's when we get into the actual history that it gets rather more suspicious...

Paul claimed to have begun his training in 1950 in Massachusetts, under the tutelage of one "Sudo Sensei". Sudo taught Paul "a small family system of jujutsu", with no further details. Apparently, when Sudo returned to Yokohama in 1958, he left Paul in charge of the dojo teaching this unnamed art, and that's seemingly where the contact ends. He enters the Marine Corp, and learnt many other arts "under various Oriental masters", with the first defined actual study and rank being the study of Kyokushin karate under Mas Oyama in "the early 60's". It's also stated that he competed (successfully) in both judo and karate tournaments... without any mention of studying judo...

I can go on, but the real issue is this "small family style of jujutsu" without a name... that's just simply not how classical arts work. That, alone, has me dismiss this as inauthentic. Combine that with some issues I've noted in some of the videos (interesting and unusual methods of some throws etc), and I'm more than hesitant to recommend this group. That said, the karate basis is likely legit, and if you enjoy it, great... but it's not likely to be what it's advertised as...
 
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FranciscoNegron

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The gun defenses just make me cringe. Were not in the era of kayfabe anymore, so the questionable back stories arent needed. The strikes seem legit and the judo is decent. No need to make up a backstory.
 

Oily Dragon

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learnt many other arts "under various Oriental masters",
I call this the "Conan goes to Asia" trope.

"He was taken to the East, a great prize, where the war masters would teach him the deepest secrets...".
 

WhiteBeltNoStripe

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Yeah, and that's where the issues and red flags are... the history as presented.

The system is claimed to be founded by one Paul Arel, who the blurbs constantly describe as "legendary", "world renowned", "the internationally highest authority in (their own martial arts)", and so on. What is noted is that he is seemingly only "legendary" and an authority in the martial arts he created... okay, not completely unusual to get some hyperbole there... but it's when we get into the actual history that it gets rather more suspicious...

Paul claimed to have begun his training in 1950 in Massachusetts, under the tutelage of one "Sudo Sensei". Sudo taught Paul "a small family system of jujutsu", with no further details. Apparently, when Sudo returned to Yokohama in 1958, he left Paul in charge of the dojo teaching this unnamed art, and that's seemingly where the contact ends. He enters the Marine Corp, and learnt many other arts "under various Oriental masters", with the first defined actual study and rank being the study of Kyokushin karate under Mas Oyama in "the early 60's". It's also stated that he competed (successfully) in both judo and karate tournaments... without any mention of studying judo...

I can go on, but the real issue is this "small family style of jujutsu" without a name... that's just simply not how classical arts work. That, alone, has me dismiss this as inauthentic. Combine that with some issues I've noted in some of the videos (interesting and unusual methods of some throws etc), and I'm more than hesitant to recommend this group. That said, the karate basis is likely legit, and if you enjoy it, great... but it's not likely to be what it's advertised as...
I don't agree with some of what you're saying, but you have definitely been involved in martial arts way longer than I have, so I must respect your opinion as you know more of what to look for. I also have an Aikido school in town, which has several higher ranked instructors as well as the head instructor. I did go see a class and am not sure how I feel about it. What I took away was that each thing they were practicing started with the practitioner standing there with their arm extended and waiting for the opponent to grab it so they could train the move. I really hope they train in more of a "sparring" setting from time to time to get some real application training as opposed to just standing there waiting to be grabbed and then it begins. Anyway, any thoughts on Aikido?
 

wab25

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I don't agree with some of what you're saying, but you have definitely been involved in martial arts way longer than I have, so I must respect your opinion as you know more of what to look for. I also have an Aikido school in town, which has several higher ranked instructors as well as the head instructor. I did go see a class and am not sure how I feel about it. What I took away was that each thing they were practicing started with the practitioner standing there with their arm extended and waiting for the opponent to grab it so they could train the move. I really hope they train in more of a "sparring" setting from time to time to get some real application training as opposed to just standing there waiting to be grabbed and then it begins. Anyway, any thoughts on Aikido?
Don't worry about what some dude on the internet tells you.... Decide what you want to train. Likely, the lineage of that Aikido School is much more straight forward and legit. But, it does not sound like all that extra lineage will make you enjoy or appreciate the training. If this school has the type of training that you want to do.... then go for it.

Now, if you wanted to train in a system that has lineage back to ancient Japan.... Then folks like Parker would be great to listen to. He is a great resource for determining who has the lineage that they claim. (most arts have this issue somewhere along the line....)

To be honest, I love reading Parker's responses here. I learn a lot from him.... and I appreciate the straight forward way explains what he sees and why it does not work. But, Parker is not going to be training here, you are not spending Parker's money here and Parker has no say in what your rank is..... Parker has pointed out that there are issues in the back story.... which makes this art pretty much the same as every other art out there.

Remember, even Parker said:
if you enjoy it, go for it.

If you don't enjoy the training, then no amount of lineage or back story is going to make up for your lack enjoyment.
 

Mider

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Hi there,

As a judoka, I like to watch videos of other practitioners. I follow Jukido Jujutsu on social media. Sensei Rego seems to have a lot of knowledge. Looks like they go hard on randori and self defense. Anyone has any experience training there? Near Daytona Beach I believe.
I enjoy watching them too
 

Mider

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Yeah, and that's where the issues and red flags are... the history as presented.

The system is claimed to be founded by one Paul Arel, who the blurbs constantly describe as "legendary", "world renowned", "the internationally highest authority in (their own martial arts)", and so on. What is noted is that he is seemingly only "legendary" and an authority in the martial arts he created... okay, not completely unusual to get some hyperbole there... but it's when we get into the actual history that it gets rather more suspicious...

Paul claimed to have begun his training in 1950 in Massachusetts, under the tutelage of one "Sudo Sensei". Sudo taught Paul "a small family system of jujutsu", with no further details. Apparently, when Sudo returned to Yokohama in 1958, he left Paul in charge of the dojo teaching this unnamed art, and that's seemingly where the contact ends. He enters the Marine Corp, and learnt many other arts "under various Oriental masters", with the first defined actual study and rank being the study of Kyokushin karate under Mas Oyama in "the early 60's". It's also stated that he competed (successfully) in both judo and karate tournaments... without any mention of studying judo...

I can go on, but the real issue is this "small family style of jujutsu" without a name... that's just simply not how classical arts work. That, alone, has me dismiss this as inauthentic. Combine that with some issues I've noted in some of the videos (interesting and unusual methods of some throws etc), and I'm more than hesitant to recommend this group. That said, the karate basis is likely legit, and if you enjoy it, great... but it's not likely to be what it's advertised as...
Can you please explain what you dont like in their techniques?

in my experience many arts, schools, students embellish their teachers skill, or even their art or schools.
 

Oily Dragon

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does anyone see issues with the judo?
Maybe I'm old fashioned, but this school seems to focus on form, drilling and show. I can't find any video of shiai, which is the way I was taught in the Kodokan school is how you get a belt promotion.

Like, any class can demonstrate the same tori/uke leg sweep action 1,000 times. But it doesn't work that way in a live situation, you need the elements of aliveness (timing, unpredictability, and resistance), all of which are standard in Kodokan judo.

I did find what looked like alive (ie unpredictable) sparring at around 2:50 below, and the gloves are novel, but that's definitely not traditional Kodokan judo. If it was one of them would have choked the other one out or something. Instead they fall, reset, and start over.

Throughout this video, and others, I just get a sense of quick surrender. Never really completing any submissions. Real Judo, especially at black belt levels, is not done this way, and all you need to do is compare these videos to some BJJ sparring to see why.

If you're not training to the absolute end game in a submission jacket art, you're kind of just going through the motions. Which look great, don't get me wrong. And they sound great too. But something is lacking and I think that's what Chris meant, not that I would ever even try to read his mind. As it is I can only read a few pages of his thoughts without tiring.

3 out of 4 stars? Not a judo expert by any means but I've been there.


 
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