Judo rank system?

Ceicei

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Does judo have a rank system? If so, is there a color rank (similar to karate)? If yes, how does the color rank go? How does a person studying judo earn rank? Is it earned by testing or competiton experience?

- Ceicei
 

Old Fat Kenpoka

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Ceicei:

Here is a link to the belt rank page on Judoinfo.com. This is a really great website.

http://www.judoinfo.com/obi.htm

Basically, each country's Judo association has some freedom for belt colorings in the Kyu ranks. The Judo associations in each country also have some freedom. Typically, 1-3 Kyu is Brown. Below 3rd Kyu, there is a lot of variety. It is also common to have different Kyu colors for Juniors.
Promotion can be tournament based, or based on other criteria.

Here is a link to how one of the local clubs does it...
http://judoka.best.vwh.net/sjb/RankDefine.htm
Follow the links on this page to see promotion criteria for competitors and for non competitors.
 

arnisador

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In fact, the modern belt system and kyu/dan ranking system was invented for Judo, by its founder. Every other system that uses colored belts and a kyu/dan type of ranking is indebted to Judo!
 
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Ceicei

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Thank you for the link. I had been there previously, but it wasn't really clear-cut in what color order judo uses. I understand there is 6 kyu, but only 5 colors are mentioned (blue, yellow, orange, green, purple, so is that the order? Is it only for juniors or adults?) It gave a lot of history/background though and elaborated a lot on two color system (white & black). It did say the judokas had to learn certain things before moving up through the ranks, but doesn't specify whether its through testing of their knowledge or if simply upon learning and using them in a competitive environment. I do know that some judo schools are sports oriented.

Basically, I was hoping for some more direct answers.

- Ceicei
 
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Gaston

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Good evening

I am glad you asked.
Your initial response was accurate; there are some variations within countries. As it seems you would like a more definitive answer. Having gone through all of the rankings up to 1st degree black, I will try to clarify things for you from Canada. Judo is comprised three categories Nage-waza (throwing techniques), Katame-waza (Grappling Techniques), and Atemi-waza (Striking Techniques). Nage-waza can be subdivided into tachi-waza (standing techniques) and sutemi-waza (sacrifice techniques). Katame-waza some of which san also be done standing is subdivided into osae-komi-waza (hold-down techniques), shime-waza (strangling techniques “also choking techniques”), and kansetsu-waza (joint techniques). Atemi-waza is similar to other striking arts and can be discussed at length if you require. There are six rankings preceding black White belt, Yellow (Gokyu), Orange (Yonkyu), Green (Sankyu), Blue (Nikyu), and Brown (Ikkyu). Finally you grade for your 1st degree black ECT to 9th. There used to be a 10th degree rank but within the Kodokan it is reserved for Jigoro Kano and his direct pupils. As kids get bored between belts we usually promote up to three stripes before the next full belt promotion. The stripes are corresponding with the next belts color. Each school requires the students to demonstrate an increasing variety of techniques kata and Judo knowledge before a promotion takes place. You usually are requested to grade when your instructor sees you are ready. You can not grade for your black belt till you are sixteen, no 6 year old black belts here. No matter how ready you are (our daughter is already practicing with me and she is only 27 months). After your black you must wait an increasing number of years to be allowed to grade for your next Dan. At which time you must provide a (uke) willing partner, points from clinics, tournament, or instructor time. Then if you pass the exam you receive your next ranking. If you have any other questions just ask. I love grappling.
 
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Ceicei

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Gaston said:
Good evening

I am glad you asked.
Your initial response was accurate; there are some variations within countries. As it seems you would like a more definitive answer. Having gone through all of the rankings up to 1st degree black, I will try to clarify things for you from Canada. Judo is comprised three categories Nage-waza (throwing techniques), Katame-waza (Grappling Techniques), and Atemi-waza (Striking Techniques). Nage-waza can be subdivided into tachi-waza (standing techniques) and sutemi-waza (sacrifice techniques). Katame-waza some of which san also be done standing is subdivided into osae-komi-waza (hold-down techniques), shime-waza (strangling techniques “also choking techniques”), and kansetsu-waza (joint techniques). Atemi-waza is similar to other striking arts and can be discussed at length if you require.


Very helpful information, thank you very much! I went to my first judo class today, and discovered I was the only beginner there. There were 10 other students. The instructor was yelling out strange names. I recognize some that you mentioned so now I understand a bit more by your explanation. She also yelled out names for specific techniques (I don't remember what they are, let alone how to spell these names), but I learned how to do them.

There are six rankings preceding black White belt, Yellow (Gokyu), Orange (Yonkyu), Green (Sankyu), Blue (Nikyu), and Brown (Ikkyu). Finally you grade for your 1st degree black ECT to 9th. There used to be a 10th degree rank but within the Kodokan it is reserved for Jigoro Kano and his direct pupils. As kids get bored between belts we usually promote up to three stripes before the next full belt promotion. The stripes are corresponding with the next belts color. Each school requires the students to demonstrate an increasing variety of techniques kata and Judo knowledge before a promotion takes place. You usually are requested to grade when your instructor sees you are ready. You can not grade for your black belt till you are sixteen, no 6 year old black belts here. No matter how ready you are (our daughter is already practicing with me and she is only 27 months). After your black you must wait an increasing number of years to be allowed to grade for your next Dan. At which time you must provide a (uke) willing partner, points from clinics, tournament, or instructor time. Then if you pass the exam you receive your next ranking. If you have any other questions just ask. I love grappling.
Apparently it takes a long time to move up through the ranks then. The other students are yellow belts and they said they've been in judo a year.

- Ceicei
 

arnisador

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There was a tradition of a tournament referee being able to promote a competitor on the spot for exceptional practice--there's a term for this practice, I believe--but I don't think it's done so much any more. It wasn't ever the dominant means of being promoted.
 

arnisador

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Ceicei said:
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Apparently it takes a long time to move up through the ranks then. The other students are yellow belts and they said they've been in judo a year.
With a sport system, be it Judo or boxing or Muay Thai, you can tell how good someone is--they compete against fellow practitioners. In other arts, it's a judgment call! What you are seeing may represent the local standard.

I think Judo is great, and that it's underestimated as a self-defense system.
 

bignick

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I actually gained one of the "battlefield" promotions arnisador talked about....kinda....

I had been training about 4 months and went to my first shiai as a white belt...it was a saturday and i was supposed to be testing for my yellow belt that tuesday...when i got there they said they wouldn't let a white belt compete...so my sensei walked over to the merchandise table...bought the biggest yellow belt they had...and said..."here, you're a yellow belt now...". thought it was funny that they wouldn't let a white belt compete...but they'd let me put that yellow belt on and all of sudden it made a big difference...anyways...i showed up the next class...in my white belt...tested for yellow...and passed....

so i walked over and grabbed the belt out of my bag and switched....good times
 
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Ceicei

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Bignick,

Interesting! Tell me about your test. What was it like?

- Ceicei
 

bignick

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well...it was just for yellow belt so it wasn't too strenuous...my judo rank comes from the USJA(united states judo assoc.)...and they have a testing booklet...the first part is vocab/written test...which i had already passed...and then you go through and for each section...pick out a certain number of techniques to demonstrate....and each level you progress you have to demonstrate more and more techniques....

i think i demontrated shoulder throw(seoi nage), hip throw(ogoshi nage), outer reap(osoto gari)...and a couple others i can't remember...than it was to demontstrate falling and such...and then it was ground work...had to demonstrate a couple different hold downs/escapes...i think it was scarf hold(kesa gatame), shoulder hold(kata gatame), and side four corners(yoko shiho gatame)...it really wasn't that bad...our instructor promotes very slowly...so by the time you test for rank you can pretty much just walk through it....that doesn't always help with the nerves of testing...but i've gotten used to those
 
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auxprix

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My Gokyu test didn't include the written component. I had to demonstrate the basics, such as walking, griping, posture, 8 directions of kazushi, and 3 parts of a throw. There were also a few basic terms that I had to know. Then the 3 sensei named 2 throws from the first set of 8. I didn't have prior knowledge of what throws I would have to Then I had to demonstrate 3 hold down techniques that I was able to choose. I had to answer questions about the systematics of the hold-downs (Why is your arm there? What do you do if uke _______?)

Over all, it was easy. However, I was testing alongside another whitebelt who botched a throw and caused me to smack my head on the mat. That really affected my ability to answer questions, but I somehow passed!
 
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Ceicei

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auxprix said:
Over all, it was easy. However, I was testing alongside another whitebelt who botched a throw and caused me to smack my head on the mat. That really affected my ability to answer questions, but I somehow passed!
I hope your head feels better by now... it could have been a concussion.

- Ceicei
 
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tmanifold

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bignick said:
I actually gained one of the "battlefield" promotions arnisador talked about....kinda....

I had been training about 4 months and went to my first shiai as a white belt...it was a saturday and i was supposed to be testing for my yellow belt that tuesday...when i got there they said they wouldn't let a white belt compete...so my sensei walked over to the merchandise table...bought the biggest yellow belt they had...and said..."here, you're a yellow belt now...". thought it was funny that they wouldn't let a white belt compete...but they'd let me put that yellow belt on and all of sudden it made a big difference...anyways...i showed up the next class...in my white belt...tested for yellow...and passed....

so i walked over and grabbed the belt out of my bag and switched....good times


That sort of thing happened for my Green belt. I was more than ready for it and they were taking for ever to get to a testing so the head instructor just gave it to me. I still had to test when they had enough people but I wore my green belt for a month before then.

I like the idea of getting a belt when your instructor feels you are ready. It has a potential for abuse but so does belt testing.
 
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auxprix

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In retrospect, I think it was a minor one. I wasn't able to come up with the Japanese terms that I knew (and I speak Japanese) which is very strange for me. I also felt very dazed and had a hard time concentrating on what I was doing.

Don't worry though, I completely recovered. This was a long time ago ::):
 

bignick

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tmanifold said:
It has a potential for abuse but so does belt testing.

So true...i'm actually facing this situation again...i've been a yellow belt since last may 2003...and my instructor wanted me to test back in may...but for some reason or another...we've just never gotten around to it...so she said once she was just thinking about bringing in a new belt and just giving it to me...

i don't think it really matters...i'm a very good yellow belt...if i may stroke my own ego a bit....we don't really follow the gokyo no waza at my dojo...we do and we still group them together like that...but there's no requirement for tests that you need to know these throws from the first set...and so on...but most of the other school in our organization do...so i'll be working with them...and they'll outrank my by a few belts...and i'll throw something that either they don't teach to yellow belts in their gym...and some will get mad...cause i'm not "supposed" to know that one....i just shrug it off and keep working...as long as i'm learning and getting better...thats all i need...
 

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as long as i'm learning and getting better...thats all i need...
My thoughts too.

In my Aikido class, there is people that have started only about 6 months ago that have passed me in rank. However, I have been going to class for almost 2 years, and still havent tested. I just dont feel like testing. The instructors know I am getting good, I know it, so That is all that really matters. I havent been able to go in a while. I wonder if my Sensei willl get tired of me being a glistening white belt after a couple more years.
 
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