Is Judo Dying?

jobo

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That's definitely part of it too, but it can't be denied that Bjj fills Judo's void almost completely. One example would be the interest in No Gi Judo that occurred after the rise of Rhonda Rousey in MMA. Where could you go to learn No-Gi Judo? Not at a Judo dojo, you had to learn it at a Bjj gym.

Bjj has a knack to eclipse and then slowly absorb any rival grappling system that emerges to challenge it. For example, Sambo and Catch Wrestling both attempted to make in-roads into the grappling scene earlier in the decade. Instead of ignoring the challenge, Bjj instructors wisely began bringing Sambo and Catch Wrestling instructors into their gyms to teach their students. Before you knew it, Bjj guys were doing leg locks and Catch Wrestling holds all over the competition circuit, effectively making the learning of either of those other grappling systems superfluous. Bjj is now starting to absorb Judo as well.

You are correct though. I think a big problem Judo has is that Tachi Waza is a lot harder to learn than Ne Waza, and frankly wrestling's takedowns are easier to learn and combine with Bjj and MMA than Judo's throws are. Unfortunately, Judo instructors frown on you bringing wrestling takedowns into Judo.

I'm not sure it's Less popular than it ever was, as it was never particularly popular,

But your last point applies, to most tmas, not just judo, as soon as the T appeared in tma, the arts were signing their own death warrant, as it's a declaration, that they won't change adapted absorb, the arts evolved to a point, where they were then frozen in time and if you don't like it, so something else.

Bjj, is the English language of ma, it just absorbs, and discards, judo and other tmas are the French of ma, maintaining its cultural heritage is far more important than, increasing it's application Or it's US e
 

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That's definitely part of it too, but it can't be denied that Bjj fills Judo's void almost completely. One example would be the interest in No Gi Judo that occurred after the rise of Rhonda Rousey in MMA. Where could you go to learn No-Gi Judo? Not at a Judo dojo, you had to learn it at a Bjj gym.

Bjj has a knack to eclipse and then slowly absorb any rival grappling system that emerges to challenge it. For example, Sambo and Catch Wrestling both attempted to make in-roads into the grappling scene earlier in the decade. Instead of ignoring the challenge, Bjj instructors wisely began bringing Sambo and Catch Wrestling instructors into their gyms to teach their students. Before you knew it, Bjj guys were doing leg locks and Catch Wrestling holds all over the competition circuit, effectively making the learning of either of those other grappling systems superfluous. Bjj is now starting to absorb Judo as well.

You are correct though. I think a big problem Judo has is that Tachi Waza is a lot harder to learn than Ne Waza, and frankly wrestling's takedowns are easier to learn and combine with Bjj and MMA than Judo's throws are. Unfortunately, Judo instructors frown on you bringing wrestling takedowns into Judo.


Why are tachi Waza harder to learn ?
 

Hanzou

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I'm not sure it's Less popular than it ever was, as it was never particularly popular,

But your last point applies, to most tmas, not just judo, as soon as the T appeared in tma, the arts were signing their own death warrant, as it's a declaration, that they won't change adapted absorb, the arts evolved to a point, where they were then frozen in time and if you don't like it, so something else.

Bjj, is the English language of ma, it just absorbs, and discards, judo and other tmas are the French of ma, maintaining its cultural heritage is far more important than, increasing it's application Or it's US e

Great points. I agree.

Why are tachi Waza harder to learn ?

Throwing requires a higher degree of technical precision that takedowns, locks, and strangles. A Double Leg Takedown for example is far easier to pull off than a good Uchi-Mata.
 

Tony Dismukes

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Why are tachi Waza harder to learn ?
It has to do with the difference between standing and ground work.

Applying grappling techniques effectively, either on the ground or standing, require that you compromise your opponent's base and structure (without compromising your own in the process). This is why kuzushi is so important whether you practice Aikido, Judo, or BJJ.

On the ground (ne waza), you can do this incrementally. You can gradually, step-by-step, work through improvements to your position relative to your opponent. Eventually you reach a place where his structure is so compromised that his ability to defend against a choke or lock is severely limited. If you can reach this point and you fail in your first attempt at a choke or lock, then you just hold the position, ratchet up the pressure, and adjust your attack until it works.

When working throws from stand-up (tachi waza), the effects of your kuzushi are much more fleeting. If I compromise my opponent's balance, then I have just a split second to enter for my throw before he rights himself. That means I have to be quick and precise. I can't generally just make him more and more off-balance for 2 minutes straight in order to secure an easy takedown.

Another side effect of this is that tachi waza typically ends up being more energy intensive than ne waza. In ne waza there are more opportunities to rest and catch your breath or at least move slowly. In tachi waza you need to move continuously and sometimes explosively. If you want a good cardio workout, standup randori is the way to go.
 

TMA17

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I observed a Judo class for a good hour and a half last night in South Jersey (Judo Movement). I really like what I saw. I believe it's the only Judo place around. It's extremely hard to find Judo schools as everything is BJJ.

As mentioned above, if BJJ absorbs what is missing from BJJ (Judo throws/takedowns/CCW) and already has the market share, it will continue to dominate.
 
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