How I train my horse stance

JowGaWolf

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I just wanted to share my approach to horse stance.

I train my horse stance at different heights. High, medium, low. Each stance represent the levels that I fight at. Each level has different strengths and weaknesses depending on my opponent's approach to attacking me. I train static and dynamic horse stances as both are equally important. It doesn't just train muscles; it also strengthens and conditions ligaments and tendons. I don't clear my mind when training my stances. I focus and try to become aware of every movement in my body no matter how small. I pay attention to weight shifts, imbalances, structure, and tension. I try to become aware of tension that occurs throughout my body. I try to relax and determine which muscles should be tense and which I can relax. What looks like a boring exercise often becomes a drill in becoming more aware of my body and the all movements and changes.

I never have a horse stance lower than what I will fight in. I rarely hold a horse stance for more than 2 minutes
 
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JowGaWolf

JowGaWolf

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I forgot to add that I train with fists chambered or my arms extended. This helps me understand how my center of balance changes and how to regain it.
 

Bill Mattocks

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Our horse stance is much higher than that of most TMA as I understand it. We call it shiko dachi or seuinchin dachi. One of the things I've been taught is that if you can't readily kick out of the stance, it's too low. Not a critique of anyone else's stance, just how we do it.
 

jobo

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I just wanted to share my approach to horse stance.

I train my horse stance at different heights. High, medium, low. Each stance represent the levels that I fight at. Each level has different strengths and weaknesses depending on my opponent's approach to attacking me. I train static and dynamic horse stances as both are equally important. It doesn't just train muscles; it also strengthens and conditions ligaments and tendons. I don't clear my mind when training my stances. I focus and try to become aware of every movement in my body no matter how small. I pay attention to weight shifts, imbalances, structure, and tension. I try to become aware of tension that occurs throughout my body. I try to relax and determine which muscles should be tense and which I can relax. What looks like a boring exercise often becomes a drill in becoming more aware of my body and the all movements and changes.

I never have a horse stance lower than what I will fight in. I rarely hold a horse stance for more than 2 minutes
I see horse stance as a really good conditioning tool, I struggle to find any value as a fighting tool. Unless there is a need to lower you centre of gravity
 

Touch Of Death

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I think the Horse stance is crucial, and you should be able to stand in it for hours. Martial arts, for the most part, is about your personal safety, and it is safer to constantly reset, so that you are ready to defend or take advantage. The Horse stance is a good home base, and the stronger it is, the better.
 

jobo

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most of the time there is no need, if some one is trying to hip throw you, it could come in handy, I'm quite tall, that gives me an advantage, why would I give that up, make myself 5ft tall and be in an awkward position that hard to get out at a any speed
 

Touch Of Death

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most of the time there is no need, if some one is trying to hip throw you, it could come in handy, I'm quite tall, that gives me an advantage, why would I give that up, make myself 5ft tall and be in an awkward position that hard to get out at a any speed
You can't fight like a jungle cat, unless you position yourself like a jungle cat. o_O
 

Martial D

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I thought you we're putting me on ignore? See you can't stick to your word on anythng
Innane comments like that, along with your lack of reading comprehension and constant bad advice like the post above that make me wonder if you have any actual martial arts experience at all are why I have you on ignore.

I just clicked the show ignored content button to see what he was laughing at.
 

Xue Sheng

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When I trained Ma bu (Horse Stance) it was very similar to this

horseS1.jpg


I no longer train Ma Bu
 

Paul_D

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I think the Horse stance is crucial, and you should be able to stand in it for hours.
Horse stance is there to teach you how to drop your body weight and keep your balance (back straight, bent legs, rather than the other way around). You will be in it fleetingly, it is a postion you pass through. It's not a position you get into and then fight, so I don't understand why you need to be able to stay in it for hours?
 
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