High Rep Weightlifting?

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pknox

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Has anybody here experimented with using higher reps on basic compound movements? I'm talking maybe 25-50 on upper body exercises, and more for lower body, and using a weight that fully exhausts you. Movements might include things such as bench, cleans, squats, rows, and overhead presses.

If so, what were your results? Did you do one set or multiple sets? How many days a week did you train?
 

jfarnsworth

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Friday is my chest day.

While working the chest as a warm up. My first two sets are of Decline Bench press with Incline cable flies. I use 15 - 20 reps on the barbell presses and 25 reps on the cable flies. This is a really good warm up and I definately notice burning in the pec muscles. Once I start on the working sets I use reps to 10 on the bench and 15 - 25 on the cable flies. The reason being is that I up the weight on the bench 20 lbs. per set and I immediately go to the cable flies. My chest will be sore for 2 days after this work out.
 
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pknox

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Interesting. Do you find the higher reps give you more definition, hypertrophy, or both, than when training with lower reps?
 
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Elfan

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20 rep squats are a famous and well known routine.
 
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pknox

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Originally posted by Elfan
20 rep squats are a famous and well known routine.

Ah, yes. I think I remember hearing about those. Those were the deep breathing squats, right? If I remember correctly, you were also using more weight than one would "traditionally" use for high reps -- i.e. like 70-80% 1RM vs. 40-50%. I can imagine that they could be quite painful, but I wouldn't be at all surprised to hear they get results. I wonder if you could do the same with benches, overhead presses, or (gasp) deadlifts?

When someone does the 20 rep squats program, do they usually do more than 1 set? How frequently could these be done on a weekly schedule?
 

jfarnsworth

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Originally posted by pknox
Interesting. Do you find the higher reps give you more definition, hypertrophy, or both, than when training with lower reps?

I try to go for mass. That workout is just something I did last friday and the friday before. I change up a lot on all my work outs. Other times I try heavier weights to 8 or 10 reps if possible. I also do decline presses with incline flies then move to incline presses and decline flies. Next to the fly machine and cable crossovers then maybe some dips if anything left. You asked about high reps and I said they burned but most of all it's probably about definition.
 
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pknox

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That's basically been my experience as well. When I go for higher reps I tend to get cut a lot easier, but I feel like I lose some of my absolute strength. I do seem to at least "feel" quicker on my feet though - it might be more psychological than anything else. I think this year I'm finally going to try periodization the right way, and have a high, medium, and low rep phase, focusing on endurance, strength, and power. We'll see how it goes. The one thing I have found though, is that when I use lower reps/heavier weights, my joints start to hurt quite a bit -- especially in my hands. That doesn't seem to happen with the high reps. I think it's more a function of weight than reps -- my guess is I have to spend more times strengthing my tendons and ligaments. Maybe by gradually easing into the heavier weights I'll give them time to catch up.
 

jfarnsworth

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Maybe you need to strech out a little more or something. I've found that at times my elbows will hurt from time to time or pop every so often while lifting. When I stretch then do a light warm up set of 20 reps then strech do another warm up set and then stretch again there aren't any problems. This is just from my experience though.
 
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Elfan

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Originally posted by pknox
Ah, yes. I think I remember hearing about those. Those were the deep breathing squats, right? If I remember correctly, you were also using more weight than one would "traditionally" use for high reps -- i.e. like 70-80% 1RM vs. 40-50%. I can imagine that they could be quite painful, but I wouldn't be at all surprised to hear they get results. I wonder if you could do the same with benches, overhead presses, or (gasp) deadlifts?

When someone does the 20 rep squats program, do they usually do more than 1 set? How frequently could these be done on a weekly schedule?

The traditional/macho answer to your question is to take the amount of weight you use use for 10 rep squats, and now do 20 of them. One set per workout and usually only about once a week I think.
 
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andurilking2

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i always train with as much weight as i can handle for as long as my body will allow me to push it.
when i weight train

when i train i always wear around 150 lbs of weight
(20 lbs on each ankle, 10 on each wrist, and a 90 lbs custom robe)
when im not training i keep the ankle and wrist weights but lose the robe just in case i happen to come upon a real fight and cant get it off, i can hold my own with it but i find it much easier to fight without it and i have to have it fastened down completely because if it moves around alot, the weight shifting tends to knock me off balance real easy.
 
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bug

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To respond to the original question,
Yes I have done some hi rep/light weight lifiting. As a general rule this type of lifting will get you toned and will also build muscle definition (if you don't go too light) Heavy wt/ low reps will develop strength and mass.
From a martial arts point of view, going to heavy can get you too bulky and slow you down.
For someone who needs to stay light fast and flexible I would definitley reccomend circuit training. With this method you go light with lots of reps and go from one muscle group to the next with no (or very little) rest inbetwwen exercizes. This also provides a great cardio workout, you can do it with machines, freeweights or both. You can do several circuits with rests inbetween. I would advise you to make sure you strech after every resistance training workout.
Just my experience hope it helps.
 
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pknox

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Sounds good! When you say "light" and "lots of reps", can you quantify that a bit more? For example, are we talking 50% of 1RM (the max you can lift for 1 rep) for 12-15 reps, or are we talking less for more reps?

The circuit training I've done - I usually stop no more than 30 sec between exercises (basically the time it takes to get to the next station and get ready), and usually no more than 1 to 2 minutes between circuits. Is that similar to what you're doing?
 
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bug

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I have found that for circuit training a target of around 15 reps is good. And I do each set untill total failure, so I am not sure how much % of max that is, but I think you should load the amount of weight to ensure that you can do 15, or so with that last rep being the absolute last one you can physically do. I think if you start getting to 12 or less you will be putting on some mass (dependant upon the person of course) and when you get up to around 20 or more you are just toning and not developing as much pwr and muscle endurance. How you are describing your circut training is very much like how I do it. Hope this is helpful, the advice is from my personal experience lifting for about 13 yrs, and it works for me, but everyone is different so there is nothing set in stone, you may have to tweak it a bit to fit you personally. I am going back to this type of lifting (also more dips, chin ups, puch ups, sit ups, etc..) after lifting heavy b/c the heavy lifting was not helpful to what I am trying to do in Systema (less tension, relaxation, flexibility) If your art requires lots of strength you may want to lift heavier.
Dont forget to strech after to maintain flexibility.
 
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RCastillo

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Originally posted by jfarnsworth
Friday is my chest day.

While working the chest as a warm up. My first two sets are of Decline Bench press with Incline cable flies. I use 15 - 20 reps on the barbell presses and 25 reps on the cable flies. This is a really good warm up and I definately notice burning in the pec muscles. Once I start on the working sets I use reps to 10 on the bench and 15 - 25 on the cable flies. The reason being is that I up the weight on the bench 20 lbs. per set and I immediately go to the cable flies. My chest will be sore for 2 days after this work out.

What chest?:)
 
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RCastillo

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I go for mass, power. They say it'll make you slower, maybe, since I am 48, but I want to be able to withstand any punishment, as well as give it. At any rate, the opening will present itself, and I'll take it for all it's worth.:asian:
 
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triwahine

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I have found that altering my program about every six weeks works really well. I will train heavy for one cycle then light the next. As a woman, I do not necessarily look to huge mass gains, just enough to stay strong. I like to throw in a powerlifting comp every now and then.

Typically, hypertrophy is done with heavy weight and low reps, between 6-8. Sets usually are 5-7 and exercises per body part vary. Some people look to doing 4 or 5 good exercises for this.

If you are looking toward muscle definition and muscle endurance, then lighter weight and higher reps are needed. For example, 12-15 reps and about 60% of the max weight. Some people maybe able to do up to 70 or 75% of their max. Each person is different. They may also only use one or two exercises per body part.

Each person needs to find what works for him/her. You never know, a combination maybe the best thing you need. Evaluate, re-evaluate, and think again. Look over every detail. Something will fit, but you need to know what your goals are.

Best of luck,
:shrug:
 

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