Guntings!

psi_radar

Black Belt
Joined
Sep 17, 2003
Messages
573
Reaction score
6
Location
Longmont Colorado
arnisador said:
The coolness of this technique, demonstrated on me by then green (?) belt Tim Hartman, was a big part of what hooked me on Modern Arnis.

This was in 1984 or 1985, in my parents' backyard.

I consider it the best knife disarm I've ever learned! One of the only ones I'd really count on--and apparently one that crosses many ma's.
:asian:
 

Simon Curran

2nd Black Belt
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Messages
792
Reaction score
10
Location
Denmark
Drifter said:
I would say that the technique Taming the Mace is the best example of a gunting in EPAK's techniques (of the tech's I have so far). :asian:
It is definately a limb attack, but maybe I am misunderstanding the description, but it seems like less of a scissoring motion than Glancing Salute is:idunno:
 

Nanalo74

Blue Belt
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
237
Reaction score
2
Location
New York
emptyhand2.jpg


This was the article I referred to in an earlier post. I hope the photos help clarify the technique.
Vic www.combatartsusa.com
 
D

Drifter

Guest
SIMONCURRAN said:
It is definately a limb attack, but maybe I am misunderstanding the description, but it seems like less of a scissoring motion than Glancing Salute is:idunno:
Glancing Salute is kind of a reverse-gunting, if you will. Instead of compressing the limb, it hyperextends. I can't really explain it well, but it does have the same type of concept. If you look at the second picture in the above article, and change the foot positioning, and the knuckle strike to a handsword, you would have Taming the Mace.
 

arnisador

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Aug 28, 2001
Messages
44,560
Reaction score
435
Location
Terre Haute, IN
Thanks for the pictures Nanalo74!

I don't know Glancing Salute but the "reverse-gunting" to which Drifter refers is still a type of scissoring motion, although it doesn't necessarily pass through the way one usually thinks of a gunting. Sometimes we call that "shocking" the elbow. But, the idea is that I can do my gunting essentially the same way against either a left or right punch. (How I shift my body, or step, would probably change of course.) So, same idea. I guess I think of it as an "interrupted" gunting motion.
 

Jerry

Blue Belt
Joined
Jan 19, 2005
Messages
226
Reaction score
14
Perhaps I missed some of the others, but there seems to be a lot of emphasis on a single guntang strike (the guntang to the arm and wrist). I was taught and use the principle far more universally than that. I'll perform limb destructions which are not guntang strikes, and guntang strikes which are not limb destructions.

Available both simultanious and staggered (try knocing their balance foreward then knocking their head backwards when they are falling), I'm more concerned with the principle than the technique.
 

arnisador

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Aug 28, 2001
Messages
44,560
Reaction score
435
Location
Terre Haute, IN
You can certainly use guntings on other than just the arm--I think the discussion is focused on that because the thread title is "Guntings!" (not "Limb Destructions!" more generally), and in a text medium it's easiest to fix on one example. In person it'd be easier to show others. I often gunting the abdomen with a slapping technique, for instance, and the head/neck is another target for it.
 
D

Drifter

Guest
arnisador said:
Thanks for the pictures Nanalo74!

I don't know Glancing Salute but the "reverse-gunting" to which Drifter refers is still a type of scissoring motion, although it doesn't necessarily pass through the way one usually thinks of a gunting. Sometimes we call that "shocking" the elbow. But, the idea is that I can do my gunting essentially the same way against either a left or right punch. (How I shift my body, or step, would probably change of course.) So, same idea. I guess I think of it as an "interrupted" gunting motion.
Yes, Glancing Salute places the left arm above the attacker's right elbow on the outside, and the right arm below the elbow on the inside, in sort of a 'temporary armbar limb destruction'. I'm just gonna keep on making up terms.

If a gunting is done with a foot, is it still considered a gunting? For example, as a defense to a right punch, parrying with your left hand and blowing out the attacker's right knee with a low front kick.
 

psi_radar

Black Belt
Joined
Sep 17, 2003
Messages
573
Reaction score
6
Location
Longmont Colorado
If you're looking for Kenpo body-type gunting attacks, think of the shearing groin/kidney attacks of Escape from Death and Grip of Death. The pain from the groin strikes cause the body to move into the kidney strike.

Those pictures are great but one thing they didn't express well is the timing. The hand-to-hand strike happens a millisecond before the arm strike, so that the upper arm is most definitely diverted toward the second strike, adding force and nervous disruption.

I generally think of guntings as a nerve and soft tissue attacks, and Glancing Salute is more of a bone and ligament attack. I'm no gunting expert, though, just a fan.
 

Nanalo74

Blue Belt
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
237
Reaction score
2
Location
New York
The example in the pics I posted above is one type of gunting. As someone else mentioned, the word "gunting" itself actually means scissors, and when applied to FMA it refers to the crossing or scissoring motion of the hands. The head, groin and limb can all be targets. The principle or concept is much more important than the technique as that concept can be applied several ways.

Glad the pics were helpful.

Vic www.combatartsusa.com
 

Simon Curran

2nd Black Belt
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Messages
792
Reaction score
10
Location
Denmark
Thanks for the clarification guys,
I have'nt been around for a while, but I think I am (kind of) getting it:asian:
 

James Clifton

Yellow Belt
Joined
Apr 4, 2006
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Guys,
I'm one of Bram Frank's people.We use the Gunting(knife)to do the Gunting.Visit Bram's site cssdsc.
Jim
 
Top