General Prices?

DatFlow

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I know you can't really compare prices between schools of completly different instructor rank's and education, but how should you judge whats good?! at My TSD school they charge us 75$ a month and its kinda steep for me anymore... I'm looking to join this BJJ school nearby and i'm wondering what its going to cost me here... What are you paying to train? Charging?
 

Hawke

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I am a little hesitant to quote prices here on the forum.

The BJJ classes here in the Los Angeles area usually go higher than $75 a month. The Machado BJJ in Redondo Beach is run by Rigan Machado (head instructor).

You can call around your city and see what the prices are like in your neighborhood.

Some places offer scholarships for people who want to train, but are currently under financial challenges.

If you're over 18 maybe you can work out an arrangement with the instructor to do some work in exchange for lessons. If you're under 18 this will cause problems with the law. Some instructors who meant well got in trouble using kids for labor in exchange for instructions (the kids would sweep the floor, clean the mirrors and windows, and throw away the trash).

The main place I train is at a martial art academy. They offer quite a few different styles (Muay Thai, JKD, Kali, Silat, MMA, Savate, BJJ). I really like my head instructor and all the full time instructors at the academy do a fine job teaching. I also pay over $75 a month, but my instructor also offers scholarships, discounts (military, LEOs, college students), and a sliding scale to help people train at his facility. I have been to quite a few different studios and the prices in and around the Los Angeles area varies from ~ $100 - $200 a month. This might sound steep, but for some of these guys this is their full time job and they have bills to pay and mouths to feed.

There are also some fabulous low key instructors that teach from their garage, beach, park and they charge a lot less. These guys are usually hard to find, they usually do not advertise, and they may or may not train you. If you can get on their good grace then this may be an option.
 
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jks9199

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There's no way to compare prices except locally -- and even then, there's no guarantee of a relationship between price and quality. I know some jiujutsu facilities that charge a base instruction fee, some that charge membership fees, others that charge mat fees... and some that are combinations of the above. I know of other martial arts clubs that charge nothing -- and are taught in parks or instructor's garages/basements/back yards, and are top notch instructors that you may not ever find the equal of. I know of very expensive schools, with all sorts of perks to the point of being more health club than dojo, and some that are very expensive, and not worth more than a tiny fraction of what they charge. Others that are very expensive -- and worth every penny and more.

Look at what's offered; assess the various packages, and see what works for you within your budget.
 

stickarts

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I have seen anywhere between free - $125 per month in this area. The best thing to do is compare prices in your area and watch classes in different schools.
 

bowser666

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It all depends on the area and availability of other schools. In a metro area I have foudn prices are typically higher than in a rural area. It all depends on the quality of the school and what you feel is worth it or not.
 

Kacey

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There are too many factors to say. How is the economy in your area? What are other schools charging? Is it a full-time school, or a class in someone else's facility (I teach at a Y, 2 nights a week)? What rank is the instructor? What about the assistant instructor(s), if any? How well-kept is the facility? Is this the instructor's primary job, or second job? I know instructors who live off instructing - fees are more important to them than to those of us who do something else for a living and teach as a second job. What MA(s) are offered? What is the quality of the instruction? What else do you have to pay for?

In the long run, only you can decide if you're getting your money's worth.
 

ArmorOfGod

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In my area, bjj schools tend to cost more since they are less plentiful
Call your local YMCA and community centers to find the hidden schools, which can be very good and well established.

$65 per month is the national average for having classes a couple of times per week.
That price is according to the vice president of NAPMA. You can see that quote here: http://familyfun.go.com/parenting/learn/activities/feature/famf28martialarts/famf28martialarts2.html

Also, read this thread: http://martialtalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=52338&highlight=aog+average
It is a similar discussion.

AoG
 
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hogstooth

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I have no idea for BJJ, probably higher than what you are paying now. There is no way to answer your question. $65.00 is pretty typical in my area but that depends on a lot of factors. The only way to answer your question is to tell you to open up a phone book and start calling.
You have to be able to afford the classes but on the other hand you may be limited in what you can take in your area for under $75.00. It all depends on the local economy, the popularity of the instructor, etc.
Best thing to do is ask around.
 

Brandon Fisher

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When we opened the dojo going on 2 years ago we felt as though $79.95 per month as a fair rate for training. I have recently found out that the schools surrounding me are charging anywhere from $99 a month for 1 hour and a half per week to as much as $125 per month for 45min per week. Honestly I think some are just to high especially when the testing fees get included which some are outrageous. $75 is actually a good price in my opinion.
 

Grenadier

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All things considered, do you think that you would be getting your money's worth?

In my former residential city, there is a school that only charges $50 / month, while the school I trained at, now charges $117 / month.

The difference, though, is that the cheaper school only held classes twice a week, for 50 minutes each class, and the more expensive school holds classes 6 days a week, and gives you instruction in both Karate and Ju Jutsu, as well as Kobudo. Each art had its own dedicated classes.

The more expensive school was a far better value for me, since it gave me what I wanted. That, plus the quality of instruction was superior.

Even though the cheaper school's reps constantly harped on how they were the most reasonably priced game in town, this is one of the times where I would simply say that I got what I paid for.
 

astrobiologist

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Ya, it is definitely hard to give a definite answer to that. Check around your local area for schools, visit each school to see the training area, the people, and get to know what they're like, and then start deciding based upon what you thought about them. A lot of schools will offer a free first lesson. If someone new comes to my school, I'll give them a tour, get to know them a little, and try my best to answer all of their questions. Hopefully, you'll find a school that is good for you financially, but also has a lot to offer for your martial arts education. Remember: Cheaper isn't always better, but being expensive doesn't qualify an instructor, either.
 

JohnASE

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Great advice here so far. Less expensive doesn't mean better value. If you switch to a less expensive school, you're taking a chance that you won't like it.

Let me add this. If you need to find a less expensive program, you might want to try churches, community centers, and park programs. These typically have lower overhead, and sometimes the instructors volunteer, so cost is usually less. However, you might be limited on when classes are offered and how the room is set up (no mirrors or mats?). Sometimes, you'll find less qualified instructors, but I know of many great instructors who teach such programs, too.

Oh, and since you mentioned BJJ, I don't know if I've ever heard of an inexpensive BJJ program, but I have heard of many inexpensive judo programs.
 

tshadowchaser

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It is amazing but prices go up with the popularity of the art. Years ago you could almost practice MMA for nothing then it became popular and prices went through the roof. Look around and ask what you will be getting for your money
 

terryl965

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It is amazing but prices go up with the popularity of the art. Years ago you could almost practice MMA for nothing then it became popular and prices went through the roof. Look around and ask what you will be getting for your money


This is so true when I took some classes about 15 years ago's it was cheap.
 

Brian R. VanCise

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There's no way to compare prices except locally -- and even then, there's no guarantee of a relationship between price and quality. I know some jiujutsu facilities that charge a base instruction fee, some that charge membership fees, others that charge mat fees... and some that are combinations of the above. I know of other martial arts clubs that charge nothing -- and are taught in parks or instructor's garages/basements/back yards, and are top notch instructors that you may not ever find the equal of. I know of very expensive schools, with all sorts of perks to the point of being more health club than dojo, and some that are very expensive, and not worth more than a tiny fraction of what they charge. Others that are very expensive -- and worth every penny and more.

Look at what's offered; assess the various packages, and see what works for you within your budget.


This is an excellent post! Look at what is offered in your area both commercially and also privately (ie. garage, etc) Then make an assesment that works for you and what you think you will enjoy the most!
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kroh

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Also, make sure that you can try before you buy. Thanks to knuckleheads going to commercial schools and ditching out on fees, many places have instituted a Tuition Collection Program. Make sure that you do not lock yourself into something you will have to pay for throughout a year just in case you don't like it.

These days, if an instructor asks me to sign a contract, I will either find a way around it or find some one else who can teach me the same thing. I have no problem paying up front. But with my job the way it is sometimes... I am not going to pay a "membership" fee for something I can't use and can't get out of.


Some of these instructors payment companies are worse than car dealerships (and sometimes walking in I feel like they are trying to sell me something.).

Be careful and good luck on your search. Just out of curiosity, have you found any place that suits you yet?

Regards,
Walt
 
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