Fighting strategy

Danny T

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- Do WC guys use "open your opponent's guard" strategy?
Can't speak for 'all' WC guys but this one does use if the situation warrants.

When you do that, do you use your leading hand, or back hand?
Yes to both again, if the situation warrants.

Do you open your opponent's guard differently depend on whether you are in uniform stance, or mirror stance?
Not certain what you mean by "uniform" stance. (matched leads?)
Doesn't matter the lead as much as range and angles do.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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Not certain what you mean by "uniform" stance. (matched leads?)
Doesn't matter the lead as much as range and angles do.
Uniform stance - you and your opponent have the same side forward.
Mirror stance - you and your opponent have different side forward.
Open guard - you can use "downward parry", or "back fist, grab, and pull' to open guard. Both methods are moving in the opposite direction.

Assume we use downward parry to open opponent's guard here.

Case 1: Uniform stance, leading hand open guard - You help your opponent to spin his body and use his back hand to punch you (bad idea).
Case 2: Uniform stance, back hand open guard - You guide your opponent's leading arm to jam his own back arm (good idea).
Case 3: Mirror stance, leading hand open guard - You guide your opponent's leading arm to jam his own back arm (good idea).
Case 4: Mirror stance, back hand open guard - You help your opponent to spin his body and use his back hand to punch you (bad idea).

For case 1 and 4, you should not use "downward parry" to open guard. You should use "back fist, grab, and pull" to open guard instead.

So if "open guard" is your strategy (what), "downward parry" and "back fist, grab, and pull" will be your tactic (how).

Here is an example for case 1. His downward parry can cause his opponent's body to spin to his right. His opponent can borrows that force to punch out his back right hand. Also his opponent's back right hand can hit his head the same time that his right hand can hit on his opponent. The person on the right has no advantage in this situation.

Sanda-leadinghand-trap.gif
 
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Martial D

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Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the face - Mike Tyson.

No, really though. When stuff goes down let your training take over. That's the plan.
 

JowGaWolf

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So

- Strategy is what.
- Tactic is how.

I have to admit that I didn't separate the difference.
yep that's I understand it, because Strategy and Tactic are closely related and difficult to distinguish between the two. Even definitions from dictionaries are confusing when you read more than one definition. So "What is our strategy and how we are going to do it." sounds logical but "What is our tactic and how are we going to do it." sounds redundant.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the face - Mike Tyson.

No, really though. When stuff goes down let your training take over. That's the plan.
A simple plan is to guide your opponent's leading arm to jam his own back arm.

When you

- Sweep your opponent's leading leg.
- Use your arm to push his leading arm against his back arm.

You are already there.

Since you have to make this happen, you need to have a plan.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the face - Mike Tyson.
Mike Tyson pointed out the issue. he didn't provide the solution.

This is why I believe to prevent your opponent from punching on your head is very important. You opponent can kick/punch on your body, but he should not be able to kick/punch on your head. If this is your goal (strategy), which path (tactic) can help you to achieve that?

This is why I invented the "rhino guard". You hide your head behind it. This may reduce your punching ability, but the chance that your head will be punched will be reduced.

Actually this "rhino guard" idea is similar to the WC "double Tan Shou" concept. If you extend both of your left and right Tang Shou, you can protect your head in between nicely. Since your opponent's jab and cross won't work well, you force your opponent to use hook punch. This will give you a chance to separate his arm away from his head.

 
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dvcochran

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Mike Tyson pointed out the issue. he didn't provide the solution.

This is why I believe to prevent your opponent from punching on your head is very important. You opponent can kick/punch on your body, but he should not be able to kick/punch on your head. If this is your goal (strategy), which path (tactic) can help you to achieve that?

This is why I invented the "rhino guard". You hide your head behind it. This may reduce your punching ability, but the chance that your head will be punched will be reduced.

Actually this "rhino guard" idea is similar to the WC "double Tan Shou" concept. If you extend both of your left and right Tang Shou, you can protect your head in between nicely. Since your opponent's jab and cross won't work well, you force your opponent to use hook punch. This will give you a chance to separate his arm away from his head.

I am certain Tysons and every other fighter had a similar strategy. That is until they discovered the other guy had a completely different and better strategy.
Get in enough fights and you are going to get hit all over. I had to figure out as many or more strategies During the fight as I did before the match.
 

Martial D

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A simple plan is to guide your opponent's leading arm to jam his own back arm.

When you

- Sweep your opponent's leading leg.
- Use your arm to push his leading arm against his back arm.

You are already there.

Since you have to make this happen, you need to have a plan.
My friend...

This is kind of an example of the meaning behind that statement. It's really easy to say 'i will do this when he does that...but..unless the 'this' is drilled hard into your muscle memory and isn't overly complex, it is unlikely to come to pass.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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My friend...

This is kind of an example of the meaning behind that statement. It's really easy to say 'i will do this when he does that...but..unless the 'this' is drilled hard into your muscle memory and isn't overly complex, it is unlikely to come to pass.
You are right. This entering strategy may require at lot of drills.

A good strategy is no matter your strategy succeed of fail, it won't put yourself into dis-advantage situation.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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To run your opponent down is an excellent strategy. If you know how do do this, you are no longer a beginner.

Strategy (what) - run your opponent down.
Tactic (how) - step in your leg between your opponent's legs.


 
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JowGaWolf

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To run your opponent down is an excellent strategy. If you know how do do this, you are no longer a beginner.
I'm not sure about this. I prefer fighters who charge in like that. They are the easiest for me to fight. In terms of how I deal with people like that.

In terms of sports fighting, very few actually try to run down an opponent unless they know the opponent is hurt or unless they know that they can over power the opponent. The reality about running down your opponent is this. You can only run me down if I try to flee escaping on a linear path.

1. If I stand my ground, my opponent will not be able run me down because their punch punches will become less effective as they jam against my body. If my opponent continue to run forward to me then we will be grappling. If opponent comes in too fast then I can take my opponent's momentum and toss them to the side or throw them.

2. If I cut an angle at the last moment of my opponent's charge, then he/she will run past me and give me a chance to counter. We saw this with the Rousey and Holm fight

3. If my opponent is chasing me then I know my opponent is not rooting. I can take advantage of that to sweep my opponent.

It's a good strategy if you know you have a big advantage to over power your opponent. But at that point the advantage is big enough where a lot of other things would be equal advantage.



I call it "Weather the storm". This guy says "Stay in the fire" same concept. This would work on someone trying to run you down.
 

Flying Crane

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I'm not sure about this. I prefer fighters who charge in like that. They are the easiest for me to fight. In terms of how I deal with people like that.

In terms of sports fighting, very few actually try to run down an opponent unless they know the opponent is hurt or unless they know that they can over power the opponent. The reality about running down your opponent is this. You can only run me down if I try to flee escaping on a linear path.

1. If I stand my ground, my opponent will not be able run me down because their punch punches will become less effective as they jam against my body. If my opponent continue to run forward to me then we will be grappling. If opponent comes in too fast then I can take my opponent's momentum and toss them to the side or throw them.

2. If I cut an angle at the last moment of my opponent's charge, then he/she will run past me and give me a chance to counter. We saw this with the Rousey and Holm fight

3. If my opponent is chasing me then I know my opponent is not rooting. I can take advantage of that to sweep my opponent.

It's a good strategy if you know you have a big advantage to over power your opponent. But at that point the advantage is big enough where a lot of other things would be equal advantage.



I call it "Weather the storm". This guy says "Stay in the fire" same concept. This would work on someone trying to run you down.
What is key is making sure the first punch lands hard and gets the enemy reeling, then you charge with more punches until he goes down. He doesnt need to be fleeing. You get him staggering with your charge.

You dont throw that first punch from a distance, as a way to bridge the gap or as a way of chasing him. That accomplishes nothing and broadcasts what your intentions are.

Once you get going, I recommend not more that three charging punches in a row because if he hasnt gone down yet you probably arent landing them well enough and he might turn the tables on you. Time to do something else.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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If you can step in between your opponent's legs, you can run him down easily. If your opponent moves right leg, you attack his left leg (or the other way around).

ru-ma-1.jpg
 
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JowGaWolf

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What is key is making sure the first punch lands hard and gets the enemy reeling, then you charge with more punches until he goes down. He doesnt need to be fleeing. You get him staggering with your charge.
Even with this a quick angle change can get the fighter out of hot water. But they have to be good on their feet because they aren't going to have the clarity or visual focus from a hit like you are describing. If they are too unsure then they can stand still, cover their head, and determine where the opponent is when by how the punches land on the guard. This has to be drilled because the defender may have to "weather the storm" and take some hits to the body so they regain there sense of location and position. If the punches land on the front then the defender should know that the attacker is in front.

Once you get going, I recommend not more that three charging punches in a row because if he hasnt gone down yet you probably arent landing them well enough and he might turn the tables on you. Time to do something else.
I agree with this as well. If there isn't much variety in the punches (types, and rhythm ) then it won't take long for someone to start picking up where the gaps are.

Punch Rhythm 1.2.3 ...1.2.3...123
Above is the punching rhythm. The dots represent the delay between punches. The more dots the more time you have to land your punch in between punches. There's no need to visually see the punches because your body is what actually picks up the rhythm as the punches land.

Punch Rhythm 1.2.1.2.1.2.1.2.1.2
This is the punch rhythm that I fell when I get charged. 3 ways I know how to deal with this even if I get hit hard in the face
.
1. Cover head and stop moving, stand my ground. Stand firm and guard the front of my head more than the side of my head. I want my attacker to abandon the jabs. The reason is because that will allow me to take over the center line. It will also change the Punch Rhythm. and the location of where the punches are landing.

The Assumption of Punch Rhythm 1.2.1.2.1.2 is that you can only punch on the rhythm pauses (the dots). For the most part this is true. But you can increase this timing if you know that a punch is going to fall on your guard. If I know that punch two is going to fall on my guard then I can punch at my attacker the same time he punches me with punch 2. You will be more than fine if your punch lands at the same time as the attacker's punch 2 lands. So long as punch 2 lands on your guard.

The mistake that prevents people from doing this is that they try to get away from the punch or they reach outwards like a Chinese Vampire. That's good for the vampire but bad for blocking punches.
 

JowGaWolf

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If you can step in between your opponent's legs, you can run him down easily. If your opponent moves right leg, you attack his left leg (or the other way around).
This is why I taught students how to stand their ground. If they stand their ground then the attacker will have no other choice but to stop trying to run you down if he still wants to punch. If you stand in one place then the attacker will stop chasing.

If you pay attention to your stance then you can prevent someone from being able to step between your legs. If you use a Mirrored stance. I think you call it uniformed stance. Then that opportunity will not exist.
 

JowGaWolf

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I'm not saying that it's a bad strategy to run someone down, I'm just pointing out that there are many practical ways to deal with it, but it has to be drilled and most people don't drill it.
 
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Flying Crane

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Even with this a quick angle change can get the fighter out of hot water. But they have to be good on their feet because they aren't going to have the clarity or visual focus from a hit like you are describing. If they are too unsure then they can stand still, cover their head, and determine where the opponent is when by how the punches land on the guard. This has to be drilled because the defender may have to "weather the storm" and take some hits to the body so they regain there sense of location and position. If the punches land on the front then the defender should know that the attacker is in front.


I agree with this as well. If there isn't much variety in the punches (types, and rhythm ) then it won't take long for someone to start picking up where the gaps are.

Punch Rhythm 1.2.3 ...1.2.3...123
Above is the punching rhythm. The dots represent the delay between punches. The more dots the more time you have to land your punch in between punches. There's no need to visually see the punches because your body is what actually picks up the rhythm as the punches land.

Punch Rhythm 1.2.1.2.1.2.1.2.1.2
This is the punch rhythm that I fell when I get charged. 3 ways I know how to deal with this even if I get hit hard in the face
.
1. Cover head and stop moving, stand my ground. Stand firm and guard the front of my head more than the side of my head. I want my attacker to abandon the jabs. The reason is because that will allow me to take over the center line. It will also change the Punch Rhythm. and the location of where the punches are landing.

The Assumption of Punch Rhythm 1.2.1.2.1.2 is that you can only punch on the rhythm pauses (the dots). For the most part this is true. But you can increase this timing if you know that a punch is going to fall on your guard. If I know that punch two is going to fall on my guard then I can punch at my attacker the same time he punches me with punch 2. You will be more than fine if your punch lands at the same time as the attacker's punch 2 lands. So long as punch 2 lands on your guard.

The mistake that prevents people from doing this is that they try to get away from the punch or they reach outwards like a Chinese Vampire. That's good for the vampire but bad for blocking punches.
Sure, nothing is guaranteed fool-proof.

Charge doesnt have to be all straight punches. Can be straight straight hook or similar combos, can change continuously. Helps keep him guessing.

But if you dont rock him with that first shot, then you have failed and further engagement with the charge tactic is going to be a dangerous gamble that I dont recommend.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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MA is all about contradiction.

A: My spear can penetrate all shields on earth.
B: My shield can stop all spears on earth.
C: What will happen when A's spear meets with B's shield?

It's all about personal training.

You can also run your opponent down when you force his leading leg to jam his own back leg. This is why the foot sweep is so useful. When you sweep your opponent's foot off the ground, your opponent will only has 1 leg standing, the best time to run him down.
 
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