Fighting stance?

Nyrotic

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I know there are probably many variations of YJKYM in fighting. From what I've heard, you can line up both feet on the centerline with most weight on the rear foot for more forward structural power, or you can offset the feet more to the sides for more balance and mobility. Is this true? And is there anything else I should know about using the stance in fighting?
 

geezer

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I know there are probably many variations of YJKYM in fighting. From what I've heard, you can line up both feet on the centerline with most weight on the rear foot for more forward structural power, or you can offset the feet more to the sides for more balance and mobility. Is this true? And is there anything else I should know about using the stance in fighting?

The back weighted stance allows the front leg to immediately come into play for both offence and defense. It is sometimes criticized for being difficult to advance rapidly from this position, but I've watched some practitioners (Leung Ting, Emin Boztepe, Jeff Webb and others) literally explode out of this position and cover long distances in a single step.

As far as aligning the feet goes, keeping thim lined up makes it easier to use your lead leg to protect your lower centerline, especially the groin. However, I've seen DTE/WC master and "cage fighting-coach" Martin Torres use the more open stance to gain lateral mobility. He shoots in at an angle, working more like a boxer (which essentially, he is). I must say that his technique is very effective. Just my dos centavos. I'm sure others will have much more to add to this.
 

dungeonworks

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Sorry, I cannot add anything constructive but would like to follow this thread. Could be a goody!
 

mook jong man

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In our lineage our fighting stance is the same stance we use in SLT and chi sau , the feet are pidgeon toed , weight spread evenly , both feet equal and toes slightly gripping the floor .

When we step forward we move like we are on railway tracks and we are taught to automatically square up after stepping or kicking so we are basically never out of our stance .

The main reason for this stance is so that we have equal opportunity to use either leg or hand , or hand techniques in conjunction with legs , there wouldn't be too many people around who could stop a low kick and a punch at the same time especially when one of their arms is being controlled .

The main things people say is " How can you move around like that " , it takes training , but in this stance i can move in any direction and at high speed .
Another thing people say is " But your groin is exposed " that maybe , but i can also jam a kick to the groin with either leg and then kick you in the groin .

Once you are in close range you dont have to worry about kicks to the groin because the person is too busy just trying to keep their balance and defend against an onslaught of low kicks and hand strikes , its a bit hard to strike back when you are going backwards and off balance .

Also another benefit of chi sau is that when you are in contact you can actually feel when somebody shifts their weight in preparation to kick and you can then nullify the attack .
 

KamonGuy2

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Whenever I fight, whether it be karate, wing chun, boxing, the movement is natural. You would not recognise it as a stance

I 'stalk' my opponent with loose movement (almost like walking) and if anything happens (he attacks or moves) I can explode into solid or flexible stancewoork depending on what is required

The important thing about footwork is that you don't straighten your legs and you don't keep them together

I will attempt to post footage of my karate knockdown tournament on here when it is ready to show what I am talking about

Remember that half the time, in bars and clubs you will be up against people who don't have much experience in martial arts
 

kidswarrior

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The back weighted stance allows the front leg to immediately come into play for both offence and defense. It is sometimes criticized for being difficult to advance rapidly from this position, but I've watched some practitioners (Leung Ting, Emin Boztepe, Jeff Webb and others) literally explode out of this position and cover long distances in a single step.
I'm not a WT guy, but am CMA and this is an interesting thread, so hope you don't mind me jumping in.

Geezer's description above sounds like the *fence* that I use and teach. Kind of a disguised cat stance, or kicking stance, with front leg light and ready to kick, spring, or just step to change the range and direction. And I agree it can be deceptively explosive. We often work on moving form this 'street' cat to a long sliding or lunging forward stance. This often catches the aggressor unaware as he's moving in. Many possibilities to capitalize on.
 

geezer

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I'm not a WT guy, but am CMA and this is an interesting thread, so hope you don't mind me jumping in.

Geezer's description above sounds like the *fence* that I use and teach. Kind of a disguised cat stance, or kicking stance, with front leg light and ready to kick, spring, or just step to change the range and direction. And I agree it can be deceptively explosive. We often work on moving form this 'street' cat to a long sliding or lunging forward stance. This often catches the aggressor unaware as he's moving in. Many possibilities to capitalize on.

It's always interesting to see how different arts from different traditions often share a good idea. Working out of a very natural position like Kamon Guy described is another idea I like.

One thing that doesn't work for me in sparring is trying to hold a "character-two" stance, as Mook described. In the system I train in, that's more typically a training posture, and also a transitional position you constantly flow through as you move and turn.
 
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