Dr. Joseph Wayne Smith

Bob Hubbard

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I picked up his book series on Wing Chun a while ago and found it to be easy to follow, with lots of info and photos.

That said, his apporach seems to be a bit different than that found from other instructors. Most other folks seem to see WC as a complete system in it self, yet he recomends grafting on techniques from White Crane kung fu to add a long range aspect to the art.

The little bit I was able to find on him seemed to indicate he was a tad excentric in his ideas.

Anyone have any extra info or possibly some websites related to him? I came up blank on my initial search.

:asian:
 
I would strongly recommend against the Joseph Wayne Smith books if you're looking for Wing Chun information. The best books on the topic are those by William Cheung -- How to Develop Chi Power, which presents most of Sil Lim Tao, Advanced Wing Chun, and Wing Chun Bil Jee would be the three with which to start. Alan Lamb's "Explosive Combat Wing Chun" books (there are two of them) are also worth having, as is Complete Wing Chun by Chu/Ritchie/Wu. The green book on which Bruce Lee is listed as an "editor," Wing Chun Kung-Fu, might also be worth your time.

I would avoid Wong's The Deceptive Hands of Wing Chun, but you might want to pick up Yip Chun's big blue Wing Chun book.

There are many more. I own several more texts, including everything (good and bad) I've just mentioned here, but you have to be careful what you buy from among the available offerings.
 
What is so wrong with his approach?

:confused:

I'll take a look at the others you mentioned. Thank you!
 
I'm not criticizing Smith so much as I am recommended someone else. I train in the Cheung lineage and consider its structure to be superior to the other lineages out there, which is why I'm trying, in my subtle way, to steer you to Cheung's work. ;)

My own Wing Chun Sifu studied White Crane for years before turning to Wing Chun and does himself mingle a bit of it into what he does (he scarcely has a choice, ingrained as it must have been).
 
In regards to wing chun books, take a look at the series of books written by Sifu Randy Williams. He offers an honest and thorough examination of the system and doesn't leave anything unexplained. I believe Sifu Williams has a new revised series of books coming out.

Stephen T.K. Chan's books are good; though it must be pointed out "The Nucleus of The Wing Chun System" is now out of print.

Personally I find the books by Sifu Cheung to be very light on in depth material. Others may find them great. Just my opinion.
 
Hi
My name is Tom.
Dr Joseph Wayne Smith's books and training saved my life in a couple of serious brawls, and I am not joking. I know one of my opponents did not last the night because I managed to break his neck in 4 places during the fight; all street legal and on camera. For winged people who take life and death seriously I cannot recommend Dr Jo's books highly enough.
If you can織t join a club, get and learn from his books !!!
 
Hi
My name is Tom.
Dr Joseph Wayne Smith's books and training saved my life in a couple of serious brawls, and I am not joking. I know one of my opponents did not last the night because I managed to break his neck in 4 places during the fight; all street legal and on camera. For winged people who take life and death seriously I cannot recommend Dr Jo's books highly enough.
If you can織t join a club, get and learn from his books !!!
His neck was broken in four places?!? How ever did you manage to see the X-rays to find that out?

BTW, I admit to being a little confused here. Where I come from, "street legal" refers to legally licensed modes of motorized transportation like cars and motorcycles, not dealing out serious and potentially fatal injuries in "brawls". And to the best of my knowledge, injuring someone while engaging in a brawl does count as "self defense" or "justifiable homocide". Where I live, such actions would likely bring charges of manslaughter or even second degree murder. ;)

Moving along, I did a search for Dr. Joseph Smith and, in addition to the founder of the Mormon Church, I found several chiropractors which I thought might be who you were talking about, based on what happened to that poor guy's neck. However, on deeper investigation I found this book, published back in 2011 and available in paperback for as little as $5. For that price I might get a copy to check out. :)

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His neck was broken in four places?!? How ever did you manage to see the X-rays to find that out?

BTW, I admit to being a little confused here. Where I come from, "street legal" refers to legally licensed modes of motorized transportation like cars and motorcycles, not dealing out serious and potentially fatal injuries in "brawls". And to the best of my knowledge, injuring someone while engaging in a brawl does count as "self defense" or "justifiable homocide". Where I live, such actions would likely bring charges of manslaughter or even second degree murder. ;)

Moving along, I did a search for Dr. Joseph Smith and, in addition to the founder of the Mormon Church, I found several chiropractors which I thought might be who you were talking about, based on what happened to that poor guy's neck. However, on deeper investigation I found this book, published back in 2011 and available in paperback for as little as $5. For that price I might get a copy to check out. :)

View attachment 31186
It's at least Manslaughter in pretty much every state...... Beyond that, killers post was to silly to respond too
 
Interestingly enough, I used to own that book. It was published at a time when I was still involved in Wing Chun, and the Crane he is referencing is the very same Tibetan crane that I train (not Fujian crane).

It was an interesting idea, combine the short range of Wing Chun with the long range of Tibetan crane. Of course anyone who thinks that either of those systems are limited to either of those ranges does not understand any of it very well.

I got rid of that book long ago, when I was in a downsizing mode.
 
I am a Wing Chun sifu and a modest Fujain crane practitioner. I don't mix them. I don't really think about them being different things in practice, though the forms and some of the movements in Crane are antithetical to Wing Chun. I benefit from both and there is no doubt in my mind that training in Crane has helped me understand Wing Chun better and it has certainly helped with my expression.

That said, Wing Chun stands on its own a system unless you want to get into grappling or enter boxing-type matches. There are some longer range bridges native to Wing Chun and the idea is to get close and stay there, so the idea that you would ever chose to fight from a longer distance shows either a misunderstanding or a rejection of Wing Chun in principle. ...or it shows that you read the Tao of Jeet Kune Do and are following the ways of Bruce Lee.

Wing Chun is not the one true way of anything. There are other ways to train and defend yourself, but most people who talk about "using only what works" and "adding x to..." never really learned it beyond a certain level.

Don't know anything about this particular author. I would also be weary of anyone claiming that the head of their lineage is the only true keeper of anything.
 

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