Cross training Hapkido and Aikido?

St Matt

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I have been training in Aikido for over a year now and I am enjoying it very much. Just recently tho I have been tempted to cross train with another martial art. So I am considering Hapkido. Obviously there are similarities between Aikido and Hapkido BUT do the two arts blend together relatively easily, ie footwork, or am I going to find it more confusing than rewarding? On the flip side are the arts so similar it wouldn't be of any benefit to train both? The reason I am thinking about Hapkido is because I think it will be similar to Aikido, which I love, but incorporates a bit more of an offensive approach with more strikes and kicks which is lacking from my current training.

Is there anyone out there that trains in both these arts that could maybe pass on some advice?

Many thanks,
Matt

P.s I did post this same question on an Aikido web forum so apologies if you have read it twice.
 

Jenna

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When deciding whether to cross train these two, I think it depends on what you are looking for from the exercise? Are you looking for a complete change? Are you looking for a good complement? Are you concerned about specific areas of your Aikido training that are lacking or not to your liking? :)

In general...

If you are looking for something different to change up your skills then the two arts are, I think, just too similar being both extensions from Daitu Ryu.

If otoh, you are looking to extend your Aikido without beginning your training as if from scratch then Hapkido is quite a good place to start as you will be already fairly familiar with the principles involved. Obviously the arts are not the same and but since both are born from the same root system, the similarities are plenty: circularity in the joint locks, pins and various throws and takedowns etc. Hapkido adopted an increased level of striking and kicking over Aikido and generally, Hapkido will give you more experience with weapons than perhaps the bo and jo that you are used to. Besides these (and your preference for a nice gi top or hakama :)) there is not a terrible amount to choose between the two.

On an extra-technical note, there is (imo) a little more formality in Aikido due to the slightly different philosophical outlooks of the architects of both systems. then again, the degree of spiritual or pseudo-spiritual paraphernalia varies as much from instructor to instructor as it does from style to style as I am sure you already know :)

Good luck, Jenna
 

oftheherd1

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I don't do Aikido, so I am not able to relate the two arts exactely. Also, my Hapkido style is Soong Moo Kwan, and may be different from what others who will comment have learned.

My understanding, in very broad terms of course, is that in Aikido, it is enough to keep the person at bay, until he gets tired and decides to just quit. If he gets hurt in the process, so be it, but that isn't the goal. Since you are an Aikido practicioner, you may know you have been taught differently.

In the Hapkido I have seen, and that which I studied, the idea was first to protect yourself (naturally common to all MA), then inflict pain and/or damage to your opponent so he will not wish to or be able to continue to fight. We tend to move into an attack, blocking, then counter-attack. This may be a strike, kick, joint lock, dislocation, throw, and if a weapon was used, we may take it away and use it on the attacker as part of the response. Anywhere you may touch me or attack me, front, back, or side, I have a defense(s). Against weapons I have defenses. From the ground I have defenses. My defenses will most likely cause pain, damage, or both. Joint locks are common, as are throws. Punches and kicks are in the arsenal. Circles are used to increase leverage and cause disorientation.

If the above describes your Aikido, then you might be better off with a book on Hapkido that describes techniques you aren't being taught, or wait until you reach a level where you are taught them. I know many techniques are common between them, as I have a co-worker that I sometimes question about a technique to see if he knows it. Some of our techniques he knows, some not. I don't know if that is because they aren't common, or just that he didn't reach a level to have learned them.
 

JohnEdward

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Principles same, application different. Hapkido, Korean version of Jujutsu. Some schools have lost principles I would think since Aikido shares principles, it could restore lost principles. Hapkido utilizes heavily strikes from Korean arts, i.e. will do jujutsu with Korean style kick or punch at some point prior to throwing. Depending on the school will kick during submission as well. Hapkido aims to do harm to disable, or kill. Uses weapons and objects as weapons in jujutsu manner, i.e. cane, belt, rope, stick, baton, bladed weapons, etc. Cane is exclusive to Hapkido, personally I enjoyed doing while having a stab at it. Hapkido is more direct like most Japanese jujutsu, you don't move around allot, like I see in Aikido. I give cross training a shot. The least that would happen is an understanding of Hapkido to give advice to someone now in your shoes.
 

oftheherd1

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As I said, I can only talk to my style of Hapkido. We seldom used the distractors as in Jujitsu, we just went in and did something; break, lock, throw, strike or combination of those. That is, sometimes you have to free yourself to then break, throw, or strike, or block a punch or kick. Often it is all one movement. Certainly as I said, our intent is to render the opponent unwilling or unable to continue, or both.

If there is a Hapkido place near you, I would go and watch, then talk to the teacher. Understand of course, besides your teacher's love of his MA, you are a potential money source. So filter his answers through that knowledge.
 

FearlessFreep

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It depends on what you are trying to accomplish. If you are just looking to break the mold of your thinking than probably any other 'art' will do just to gain a difference in perspective.

If, for example, you are looking for a full fighting system than, to me, Aikido and Hapkido work too much in the same realm (from what little I know of Aikido http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aikido). My instructor breaks down fighting ranges into Ground, Clinch, Close-Quarters Combat, Medium and Long Ranges. Aikido and Hapkido seem to both live mostly in the close quarter combat range using redirection of force. So if you are looking to expand your fighting system I would move to an art that either a) works a different range or b) works the same range with a different philosophy. An example of b) would be Muy Thai or Tae Kwon Do which work the CCG range but with hard, ballistic strikes (Muy Thai also works the Clinch and Medium ranges, Tae Kwon Do also works Medium and Long ranges) For a) you can look at again Muy Thai and Tae Kwon Do but Muy Thai for the way to uses clinches for control, Judo for clinches into throws and take downs, BJJ for ground fighting (*nobody* fights on the ground like BJJ and wrestling!), and then the transitions (how do you go from a CCG fight to a clinch to a take down to the ground? and which side of the exchange are you on?)

OK, re-reading your post, you've only been doing Aikido for a year...I would avoid Hapkido because they are probably similar enough that at this point they would probably confuse you. Yes, Hapkido is similar to Aikido plus kicking but if that's what you want then you should move to Hapkido rather than try to do the two together. If you want to get a feel for the different philosophies and 'art' of different arts than I think you should immerse yourself in Aikido for awhile longer before trying to adapt to a new mindset
 

iron_ox

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Hello all,

Stay with one art long enough to get very proficient. If yo have the time and the money, give it to your Aikido instructor for private lessons...
 

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