Burmese arts (Thaing).

arnisador

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From here:
But the bando system is not all of Burmese martial arts. The overall name is actually 'thaing'. This word is Burmese for 'self defense'. The term is the equivalent of the Chinese term 'wushu'.

Among the arts of unarmed combat listed under the term 'thaing' are:

Bando
Lethwei or Burmese Boxing
Naban or Burmese wrestling

I have also heard of Kachin Burmese groundfighting. Are there others?
 
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arnisador

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I attended a camp at which Dr. Gyi taught three sessions this past weekend. Two sessions focused on the dhot (three foot stick) and one on partner-assisted yoga for healing.

The stick-fighting sessions were great, and I found it interesting that he stressed that no move has more than three steps in his system (it's a "dumptruck" system, not a fancy one). In fact, it was almost numerology: Everything came in 3s except for a few things that came in 9s. Three steps, three reasons to have your opponent face down on the ground, nine weapons (hands, elbows, feet, knees, headbutt).

What is the administrative structure of bando in Burma (if any)? Is there a single person at the top, or lots of local variants of the system?
 
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Stickgrappler

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arnisador,

i've been to a few Dr. Gyi seminars, but the one i really wanted to attend but could not was on the UN Riot baton (3'long) which may or may not be the same or overlap with the dhot. there is a lot of stickgrappling material that he taught that i missed out on :-(


the 9 or factors of 3, are an influence from Alexander the Great. he conquered old time burma and Alexander the Great had his soldiers drill stuff in 3's or 9's to keep it simple. something like that. i forget the exact story, but know the source is attributed to Alexander.

re: dhot, can you go over maybe 1 technique sequence? if you can share anything on the dhot, it would be greatly appreciated. post or email?

the Letha is good, no? very good stuff!

you lucky dog! i wish i could've went. sounds like i missed out on some good training/learning.


re: more bando links: there is another URL - the WBA (world bando assoc) but it doesnot have much info on it yet. when i find it, i will post it.

re: structure, i believe it's gov't controlled organization in mynamar (sp? - modern day burma). supposedly many masters who teach in this org may not be teaching the indigenous arts and may be passing tkd, karate,etc off as bando/thaing. for the real, indigenous arts, you have to go to the remote villages.

not sure if you know, Phil Dunlap of Kachin bando has a new URL - he is planning an overhaul of the site soon - www.thaing.net
 
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arnisador

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Thanks for the info. and links Stickgrappler. Dr. Gyi mentioned Alexander the Great w.r.t. the kukri but not the larger training program.

I believe that we were taught techniques appropriate to the UN riot baton (we used a 3' long stick with a loop of string at the end that went around the wrist for securing the stick). I know he developed techniques for them but I gathered that the dhot techniques we studied were not those techniques per se but were older techniques that were used on the same weapon. (I'm not sure.) I'll try to explain a few techniques!

We started with the blocks: Three on each side (upper, middle, lower). All blocks used the hand not holding the stick on the wrist of the hand holding the stick as a support but were otherwise just what you'd expect, e.g. the upper blocks were basically the roof and slant blocks of Modern Arnis. he had us hammer full power with padded sticks and you really learned if you were blocking right or no! He emphasized that in practice the attacker would not have a stcik but rather a shovel or other improvised weapon. We practiced combinations, such as block high right the high left, etc.

The interesting stuff was the chokes. We did the fang choke. Do any block, step in and press against his right side and use the butt end of the stick, the end near your hand, to press on the left side of his throat, near the windpipe. Pull in, choking him.

The next two techniques were for use if the fang choke failed. If you missed it because you ended up in front of his throat rather than on it, a choke followed; if you missed it because you ended up behind his neck instead of on his throat, a choke followed (leave your hand where it is, flip the stick 180 degrees and put it under your arm or similarly to get the choke, with your other arm grabbing it and coming across the neck). Sorry, these are too hard to describe.

In every case, take him to the ground, face down.

Fascinating stuff! Simple yet extremely effective. He also did a defense for an opponent in the mount pressing the middle of his stick against your throat (roll him over and slide into a choke) and a technique that used a hip throw.

I wish I could share more but it's not made for a purely written medium I'm afraid.
 
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Stickgrappler

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arnisador,

thank you! most of it came through in your post. i have some idea of what you posted. this makes me really want to attend a seminar if he ever teaches the material again.
 

OULobo

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I'm digging up old threads to post on and thought I would add to a few. In the style of Bando taught here in America by Dr. Gyi there is Naban. It had been in hibernation because there were few interested in ground fighting until fairly recently. Naban finds its roots in India and Pakistan. Here it was where the biggest and meanest entered a ring and went at it. The system was a "big man's" art and champions were often 260+lbs. I have seen old pic of these guys and they look the part. The best way to describe them is that they look like the Mongolian guy from The Quest. The old school tourneys had no rules, all gouges, groin strikes and dirty tricks were legal.

Naban now is fairly active within the Bando community. There is a national tournament that is held annually and the it is fairly unique. The starting position is a palm to wrist grip and the match continues until the opponent is pinned for three count or a tap out. The competition is rough and hard for BJJ guys to get used to because of the count out rule.
 

OULobo

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The python is part of the animal systems of Bando and I'm sure is applicable in Naban, but Naban is a free standing system also. My experience with Naban was more trial and error than classical technique.
 
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