Boxing Sparring Footage 12-12-2021

Ivan

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Hi. As per my last post, I stated that I was having trouble with an opponent. In the thread, I said I would try to post some sparring footage so I can get some feedback on what and how to improve. I am specifically looking to improve my footwork. I am the guy with the grey sweats and black superman shirt, and red shoes.
These are the videos in order of the rounds which I sparred in. My opponents were much less experienced than me, so I don't believe I was able to accurately present my knowledge and skill, but it will have to do for now.

In the first video, you can see me using my reach to harass my opponent with my jab, and also counter punch him quite a bit. I also attempted to use my switch step to change direction and stance to keep him on his toes, but I feel it needs polish as it looks clunky and I used it too often.

My second round was against another opponent of bigger weight and size, but due to his lack of a mouthpiece, we agreed to keep our sparring to the body only. I focused on keeping up the pressure and attempting to land more accurately placed body shots and just keeping it generally more light and technical.

My third and final round was against my original opponent. This time, I asked my coach what to focus on, and he said a crucial skill for amateurs is to be able to get inside jabs. In this clip, I did my best to bait out as many of his punches as I could so I could try to move in, even though my natural habit is to step or lean back and then counter with jabs or overhand rights due to my above-average reach.

Thanks to everyone taking their time watching and criticizing this. Every little helps. Again, I am focusing on improving my footwork and movement towards the inside, so if you can spot anything I am doing wrong or I can improve upon specifically, I would really appreciate it if you could eave some drills for me to work on. Thank you all!
 

drop bear

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It is hard to tell because you are having such an easy time of it.


But he is doing what you were probably doing. Just letting you sit there and command the range.
 
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Ivan

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It is hard to tell because you are having such an easy time of it.


But he is doing what you were probably doing. Just letting you sit there and command the range.
If it were him posting these videos, how would you advise him on dealing with me?
 

drop bear

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If it were him posting these videos, how would you advise him on dealing with me?

Same as I said to you. He can't just keep walking in to range and hoping to win that exchange. Because he never will.

He needs to make you move or react. So that you are opening yourself up more.

Otherwise try a few overhand rights and counter right hands. Because your jab was lazy.
 
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Ivan

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Same as I said to you. He can't just keep walking in to range and hoping to win that exchange. Because he never will.

He needs to make you move or react. So that you are opening yourself up more.

Otherwise try a few overhand rights and counter right hands. Because your jab was lazy.
Okay, thanks. I know you're right as I recall that at one point I gave up baiting the guy I was having trouble with and just stuck my hands up and proceeded to eat all of his punches in an attempt to close distance :dead: Very bad move on my part but he got me angry and frustrated.
Is there anything you can nitpick about my footwork? My coach says I need to be more fluid and on my toes but I am not sure what he is referring to specifically.
 

JowGaWolf

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I see a lot of step and drag footwork. You like walking to your opponent and that's fine for someone who doesn't have the reach or the speed, but you can build some bad habits because you are using 2 boxes to perform an action. You walk, then punch. You walk, then punch. If you fight someone who can fight moving backwards, they are going to tag you every time you walk in because they know nothing is coming with that walk. No angle change, no punch just a straight forward movement.

So here's I would coach to your 1st opponent as if I'm talking to him..
1. Your guy likes to stand too tall so he's are going to have some mobility issues with his footwork once the advance is aggressive. When he moves it looks like he legs are locking sometimes which gives a jagged movement like he's landing on straight legs. Make him pay for standing tall get in there, inside his punches. Be aggressive with your foot work. He lakes to step then drag, then punch. Time that gap either catch him dragging or catch him stepping. Take an angle when you attack at that moment so he can change direction easily. He's standing tall and he's legs are going to have a hard time to adjust. Just because punches are light doesn't mean footwork should be light too. Get in there.

2. Stop punching at his distance, he's got longer arms than you so you gotta get in. It's light sparring. Now is the best time to get hit in the face because you made a mistake. Hell, now is the best time to make a mistake period and to learn from it so you don't make the same mistake when it's heavy sparring.

3. When he does that funny step move in on him the herd him like sheep. Lets see if he can actually do something. He actually do something when he's back on his heels. Be quick and aggressive with your footwork. Make him regret step and drag.

4. Deal with that lead hand (this is the kung fu in me). Don't let that his lead hand have freedom to Jab without response. Either knock it out of the way or slip or both. Don't let that jab come in freely. Knock it out of the as you come in

5. I don't want to see another rear hand punch unless you are close enough to hug him. Stop trying to make that rear hand punch your longest punch.

If you can't remember all that I said then focus on that jab. Trigger his jab and move forward. Fighting on his inside is your safe place.
 

JowGaWolf

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I see a lot of step and drag footwork. You like walking to your opponent and that's fine for someone who doesn't have the reach or the speed, but you can build some bad habits because you are using 2 boxes to perform an action. You walk, then punch. You walk, then punch. If you fight someone who can fight moving backwards, they are going to tag you every time you walk in because they know nothing is coming with that walk. No angle change, no punch just a straight forward movement.

So here's I would coach to your 1st opponent as if I'm talking to him..
1. Your guy likes to stand too tall so he's are going to have some mobility issues with his footwork once the advance is aggressive. When he moves it looks like he legs are locking sometimes which gives a jagged movement like he's landing on straight legs. Make him pay for standing tall get in there, inside his punches. Be aggressive with your foot work. He lakes to step then drag, then punch. Time that gap either catch him dragging or catch him stepping. Take an angle when you attack at that moment so he can change direction easily. He's standing tall and he's legs are going to have a hard time to adjust. Just because punches are light doesn't mean footwork should be light too. Get in there.

2. Stop punching at his distance, he's got longer arms than you so you gotta get in. It's light sparring. Now is the best time to get hit in the face because you made a mistake. Hell, now is the best time to make a mistake period and to learn from it so you don't make the same mistake when it's heavy sparring.

3. When he does that funny step move in on him the herd him like sheep. Lets see if he can actually do something. He actually do something when he's back on his heels. Be quick and aggressive with your footwork. Make him regret step and drag.

4. Deal with that lead hand (this is the kung fu in me). Don't let that his lead hand have freedom to Jab without response. Either knock it out of the way or slip or both. Don't let that jab come in freely. Knock it out of the as you come in

5. I don't want to see another rear hand punch unless you are close enough to hug him. Stop trying to make that rear hand punch your longest punch.

If you can't remember all that I said then focus on that jab. Trigger his jab and move forward. Fighting on his inside is your safe place.
I forgot number 6. Stop praying. Gloves are too close to your face for no reason Learn when to keep them close to your head and when to give some distance. Gloves that close to your face aren't going to be to react to an incoming jab in time. By the time your hands react the punch is already on your face. Unless you plan on slipping some punches are taking some hits, then give your hands some distance.

For you Ivan, I think your footwork would improve if you bend your knees more. Your footwork reminds me alot of my sparring partner. He liked to stand up tall and it cause noticeable issue with his foot work. He had that same jerk in his movement which reminded me of someone landing with their legs locked.
 

JowGaWolf

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It is hard to tell because you are having such an easy time of it.


But he is doing what you were probably doing. Just letting you sit there and command the range.
Short guy had no reach. His only option is to fight in the inside, but his footwork isn't agressive enough to get him there.
 
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Ivan

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I forgot number 6. Stop praying. Gloves are too close to your face for no reason Learn when to keep them close to your head and when to give some distance. Gloves that close to your face aren't going to be to react to an incoming jab in time. By the time your hands react the punch is already on your face. Unless you plan on slipping some punches are taking some hits, then give your hands some distance.

For you Ivan, I think your footwork would improve if you bend your knees more. Your footwork reminds me alot of my sparring partner. He liked to stand up tall and it cause noticeable issue with his foot work. He had that same jerk in his movement which reminded me of someone landing with their legs locked.
Your advice on how to coach my opponent was insightful. How will I know if I am bending my knees enough?

Also, the step and drag footwork are me attempting to utilize standing boxing footwork, in which you move the foot closest to your desired direction first, and the other drags behind. I assume that the issue in this is that my punches are not landing when my feet land (e.g. jab should land the same moment the forward foot lands when walking forward and jabbing), and that my punch lands either too quickly or too slowly to do this properly?
 

JowGaWolf

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Your advice on how to coach my opponent was insightful. How will I know if I am bending my knees enough?
Visually, your movement will look smoother

From your point of I think of it like this: If I have to lower my stance in order to get enough bend in my knee to spring forward then I'm standing too tall. Legs should be bent enough where I can can just move left, right, forward, or backwards without having to lower my stance first. When my front foot lands, I don't want to land stiff legged or tall, because I may need to quickly change direction after landing. Legs should always be ready to power movement. The only way to do this is to keep enough bend in your legs

The other good thing about bent knees is that it helps to generate power with the punches. It follows the same concept of legs always being ready. The most logical way would probably to shadow box at different stance levels. Start with your normal stance height and then lower it a bit. Then after a few more minutes lower it again. Find a good stance that is lower than what you used to , but feels like you can move without feeling like your legs are about to dissolve.

If your legs burn out really quick then you are too low and are probably at a height that is best for grappling. You got some long legs so, that extra bend in your knees should make it. More difficult for people to reach your face. It should also open up more opportunities to bob and weave and close the gap against those who like to fight from the outside.

Also, the step and drag footwork are me attempting to utilize standing boxing footwork, in which you move the foot closest to your desired direction first, and the other drags behind.
There is a right time and place for that. Use it at the wrong time and it will have a negative effect on your foot work. Think of any foot drag like a "light brake" you just want your foot to get a little friction as you try to keep your foot close to the ground. The concept is that you are trying to reduce the amount of time that it takes to put solid weight on your foot. Don't drag your foot like a ship anchor. Basically the sooner you can plant your foot the sooner you'll be able to throw a punch. The more efficient your footwork is the easier everything will become.
 

drop bear

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Okay, thanks. I know you're right as I recall that at one point I gave up baiting the guy I was having trouble with and just stuck my hands up and proceeded to eat all of his punches in an attempt to close distance :dead: Very bad move on my part but he got me angry and frustrated.
Is there anything you can nitpick about my footwork? My coach says I need to be more fluid and on my toes but I am not sure what he is referring to specifically.

You footwork is kind of atrocious. I will check the video again. But from memory your back heel is on the ground and you are just kind of walking around.

Yeah. So get your back heel off the ground. This will probably make you fall over most of the time. Because your doesn't look great.

So when you can move around with that back heel up. That should fix the rest of it.
 
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Ivan

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You footwork is kind of atrocious. I will check the video again. But from memory your back heel is on the ground and you are just kind of walking around.

Yeah. So get your back heel off the ground. This will probably make you fall over most of the time. Because your doesn't look great.

So when you can move around with that back heel up. That should fix the rest of it.
Haha thank you for the honesty I appreciate it. I have found myself wobbling when shadowboxing and I have been trying to fix that for a while, but its nice to know what the issue is now.
 
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Ivan

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Visually, your movement will look smoother

From your point of I think of it like this: If I have to lower my stance in order to get enough bend in my knee to spring forward then I'm standing too tall. Legs should be bent enough where I can can just move left, right, forward, or backwards without having to lower my stance first. When my front foot lands, I don't want to land stiff legged or tall, because I may need to quickly change direction after landing. Legs should always be ready to power movement. The only way to do this is to keep enough bend in your legs

The other good thing about bent knees is that it helps to generate power with the punches. It follows the same concept of legs always being ready. The most logical way would probably to shadow box at different stance levels. Start with your normal stance height and then lower it a bit. Then after a few more minutes lower it again. Find a good stance that is lower than what you used to , but feels like you can move without feeling like your legs are about to dissolve.

If your legs burn out really quick then you are too low and are probably at a height that is best for grappling. You got some long legs so, that extra bend in your knees should make it. More difficult for people to reach your face. It should also open up more opportunities to bob and weave and close the gap against those who like to fight from the outside.


There is a right time and place for that. Use it at the wrong time and it will have a negative effect on your foot work. Think of any foot drag like a "light brake" you just want your foot to get a little friction as you try to keep your foot close to the ground. The concept is that you are trying to reduce the amount of time that it takes to put solid weight on your foot. Don't drag your foot like a ship anchor. Basically the sooner you can plant your foot the sooner you'll be able to throw a punch. The more efficient your footwork is the easier everything will become.
I think this makes sense. I will practice my shadowboxing with my heels off the ground and a lower but comfortable centre of gravity. I will post another video for feedback when I think Ive got it. Thank you all very much.
 

JowGaWolf

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I think this makes sense. I will practice my shadowboxing with my heels off the ground and a lower but comfortable centre of gravity. I will post another video for feedback when I think Ive got it. Thank you all very much.
Keep in mind that it doesn't have to be heels down all the time or heels up all the time.
 
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Ivan

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Keep in mind that it doesn't have to be heels down all the time or heels up all the time.
I will thanks. I imagine my heels will come down when they need to once I become experienced with this.
 
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