better combo with boxing?

williamsdean02

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What are good combo arts with boxing? Krav? JKD? Systema? MT? What is the best to study after boxing? I'm thinking of doing krav in four or five years after boxing.


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Jenna

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Why will you wait four or five years?

Maybe the greater the similarity between your new art and boxing, the more gradual the broadening of your range of skills at the expense of leaving blind spots or weaker areas in your overall "roundedness" as a martial artist if that is a concern. Then again, the greater the dissimilarity between the two arts, the steeper your learning curve with the potential gain of gap-plugging or short comings in your skill set. Depends where you are at, right? and where your interests lie. You could theorise on compatabilities all day, ultimately a combo that work for some one else may not work for you. Good luck though Jx
 

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The default answer is either wrestling, judo or BJJ. It depends on what your end goal is. Do you want self-defence, a career in MMA, or is it just for general interest?
 

lklawson

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The default answer is either wrestling, judo or BJJ. It depends on what your end goal is.
What he said.

My preference is Judo, but it's not the same art as it was 50 years ago. It's much more focused now on Olympic style competition or on prep for MMA. But it's generally fairly accessible and inexpensive.

BJJ is very much available now. Quite popular. You shouldn't have much trouble finding a BJJ club. Bring your wallet.

Western "wrestling" is a bit vague. It covers a lot of styles from Greco-Roman, "Collegiate," to Catch-as-Catch-Can. It can be harder for an adult to find a wrestling club but what you will find will usually be good.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

Bill Mattocks

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What are good combo arts with boxing? Krav? JKD? Systema? MT? What is the best to study after boxing? I'm thinking of doing krav in four or five years after boxing.

I don't know much about boxing, but is it something one learns and then stops training in? You say "after boxing" as if you are going to stop training. Is there some reason for this?

My own humble suggestion is that you keep training in the art you prefer. If you have lost interest in boxing, then pick another that does interest you. The advice of others, including myself, on which art to choose, is hardly likely to be more useful than random chance as compared to what you find yourself suited for.

It seems to me that many newcomers to martial arts seem to think they need to get a basic grasp on many arts, instead of sticking with one and learning it to the extent one is capable of learning it. You know the old saying "Jack of all trades, master of none." What is the point of intentionally being bad at a lot of arts instead of being good at one?
 

lklawson

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I don't know much about boxing, but is it something one learns and then stops training in? You say "after boxing" as if you are going to stop training. Is there some reason for this?

My own humble suggestion is that you keep training in the art you prefer. If you have lost interest in boxing, then pick another that does interest you. The advice of others, including myself, on which art to choose, is hardly likely to be more useful than random chance as compared to what you find yourself suited for.
Most boxers seem to look at it as a hard-knocks contact sport for the young. To a certain degree, this is true. Once you pass your prime you really can't "mix it up" with the young bucks like you used to. Age robs you of speed and stamina. Yeah, a 55 year old boxer who keeps "in training" will clean the clock of your average bozo off the street. But, as a general rule, he's not going to be able to keep up with a 25 year old boxer in daily training.

Those who truly love it, and there are some, will keep sparring but they stop trying to box at a competitive level, which is, honestly, bread and butter for boxing. There's a reason that Foreman is selling grills now instead of pulling title cards. I wouldn't want to go a few rounds with him, but he's not going to be defending any professional belts.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

Bill Mattocks

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Most boxers seem to look at it as a hard-knocks contact sport for the young. To a certain degree, this is true. Once you pass your prime you really can't "mix it up" with the young bucks like you used to. Age robs you of speed and stamina. Yeah, a 55 year old boxer who keeps "in training" will clean the clock of your average bozo off the street. But, as a general rule, he's not going to be able to keep up with a 25 year old boxer in daily training.

Those who truly love it, and there are some, will keep sparring but they stop trying to box at a competitive level, which is, honestly, bread and butter for boxing. There's a reason that Foreman is selling grills now instead of pulling title cards. I wouldn't want to go a few rounds with him, but he's not going to be defending any professional belts.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk

Ah, once again I have been schooled. Thanks! In my style of martial arts, the oldsters are often the most dangerous.
 
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williamsdean02

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yeah, I want to stick with a martial art and get good at it but I'm wondering what arts go with which arts for the long run.


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williamsdean02

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like with boxing. is krav a good idea? SAMBO?


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williamsdean02

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I don't know much about boxing, but is it something one learns and then stops training in? You say "after boxing" as if you are going to stop training. Is there some reason for this?

My own humble suggestion is that you keep training in the art you prefer. If you have lost interest in boxing, then pick another that does interest you. The advice of others, including myself, on which art to choose, is hardly likely to be more useful than random chance as compared to what you find yourself suited for.

It seems to me that many newcomers to martial arts seem to think they need to get a basic grasp on many arts, instead of sticking with one and learning it to the extent one is capable of learning it. You know the old saying "Jack of all trades, master of none." What is the point of intentionally being bad at a lot of arts instead of being good at one?


Yes, I agree. But I'm just curious about the knowledge in addition to becoming
a martial artist.


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lklawson

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like with boxing. is krav a good idea? SAMBO?
Sambo, yes. 90+% of the Krav I've seen has been crap. I'm sure that some of it is good. But there was a time when Krav was super popular and less-than-scrupulous "trainers" were handing out Krav "certifications" for attending a weekend seminar.

I have a few friends in the Krav community. I'd trust them. Not many others.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

Bill Mattocks

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Yes, I agree. But I'm just curious about the knowledge in addition to becoming
a martial artist.


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lklawson educated me on the fact that boxers can't box forever. I didn't consider that, so I consider myself corrected.

In general, however, my point was that most martial artists don't bother to learn one art well, and many jump from art to art, managing to learn enough to suck at all of them. It's boring and non-sexy to simply choose and art and stick with it for 40 or so years, but it's the path to mastery. I assume, of course, that mastery is the goal, and not simply knowing enough to suck at a bunch of martial arts. ;)
 

lklawson

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lklawson educated me on the fact that boxers can't box forever. I didn't consider that, so I consider myself corrected.;)
Well, not competitively anyhow. A lot will keep at it for most of their lives, but entering a Golden Gloves when you are 50 is probably a sure way to get a beating. But they still need trainers, instructors, coaches, and people to do light-to-moderate sparring in the ring.

Being old doesn't mean you can't box. But being "past your prime" has serious implications for how hard you can go and how far you can take it. Same with MMA. If you want a competitive career, you'd better get in while you are young. After that you train for fun and because you love what you're doing.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

drop bear

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Well, not competitively anyhow. A lot will keep at it for most of their lives, but entering a Golden Gloves when you are 50 is probably a sure way to get a beating. But they still need trainers, instructors, coaches, and people to do light-to-moderate sparring in the ring.

Being old doesn't mean you can't box. But being "past your prime" has serious implications for how hard you can go and how far you can take it. Same with MMA. If you want a competitive career, you'd better get in while you are young. After that you train for fun and because you love what you're doing.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk

Masters division.

Masters | boxing.org.au

Masters Boxing
 
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williamsdean02

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Thanks for the advice. So then is anyone good at multiple arts?


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williamsdean02

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I'll just stay with boxing though until I master it. Thanks for telling me this.


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Dirty Dog

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Thanks for the advice. So then is anyone good at multiple arts?

Lots of people train in multiple arts. Here at MartialTalk, there are any number of people with Dan rankings in more than one art.
But most will agree that it's best to be solidly grounded in whatever the "primary" art is before branching out.
 
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williamsdean02

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thanks. I'll follow that advice. what is the equivalent of black belt in boxing


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Dirty Dog

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thanks. I'll follow that advice. what is the equivalent of black belt in boxing

I have no idea, never having studied boxing. However, one of the other things you will find most of us in agreement on is that rank, as defined by a belt color, really only has true meaning within the system or school that issued it.
My own feeling is that you need to be proficient enough at art A to be considered an instructor before worrying about learning art B.
In our school, that would mean a 1st degree Black Belt, because we expect a 1st Dan to be able to cover the entire colored belt curriculum without supervision.
In a strictly KKW TKD school, I believe this would mean a 4th Dan, because that is the rank at which they are expected to be able to teach unsupervised.
 
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