Basic Question *Decisions*

PeteMc

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jan 29, 2010
Messages
24
Reaction score
1
Location
Illinois
Hello all, this is my first of likely many posts and I figured i'd start by asking your opinoins on which martial arts I should do first. I have been researching some martial arts for a few weeks trying to figure out which one I wanted to do first, I say first because I am planning on, over the years, learning more than one type of martial arts.
Here's what I have been thinking about taking.

Kung Fu - I am thinking about Kung Fu because there are many different variations and a friend of mine said that it was too hard for him so now he does Karate

Hapkido - I am thinking of Hapkido because my father is black a black belt in it (He doesnt train in it much anymore) and he said it was really useful in his line of work and it teaches discipline.

Brazillian Jiu-Jitsu - This is a type of Martial Arts referred to me from a friend of mine who does MMA he said it is the best for making an opponet submit quickly.

Muay Thai - Personally, I think that this just looks cool and seems very difficult and I like to challenge myself.

Kenpo - No reason other than it looks kinda fun =P

Any help on this subject would be great, I used to be the wrestling captain in my Highschool, but I stopped because I got tired of it and I was a captain for our football team this past year *Sophomore Year* so I am still pretty athletic and think I can pull off doing martial arts seeing as I am only 16.
Thank you in advance,
-Pete
 
Last edited:

Akira

Green Belt
Joined
Jan 30, 2009
Messages
181
Reaction score
2
Location
Bangkok
Most martial arts gyms will let you take 1 or 2 free lessons right? So do a lesson of each and see what you enjoy the most.

PS muay thai is a sport, not a martial art. If you got bored of wrestling you may get bored of this too, but don't let that put you off trying it, just something to keep in mind.
 
OP
P

PeteMc

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jan 29, 2010
Messages
24
Reaction score
1
Location
Illinois
Thank you for the help... and idk if martial arts gyms will let me haha i've never done martial arts before and thanks for clearing up Muay Thai for me =) but I don't think I will get bored of martial arts because it is a lot more dynamic than wrestling from what I have seen and heard.
 

Blade96

Senior Master
Joined
Jan 17, 2010
Messages
2,042
Reaction score
38
Location
Newfoundland, Canada
akira's right, most will let you watch a class or 2 and even take a lesson or 2 for free and see if you like it. When i signed up for kenpo karate and shotokan karate in september 2009 they let me both watch a lesson and have a free tryout. I signed up for both and then when my time was up I left the kenpo in november - because I have already chosen my martial art. And I dont regret it :)
 
OP
P

PeteMc

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jan 29, 2010
Messages
24
Reaction score
1
Location
Illinois
Thank you for the help as well ! I will see if the nearest Kung Fu and Jiu-Jitsu schools will let me sit in on a class or 2... and I already know that I like hapkido because of sitting in my dad's sessions when I was younger... or maybe it was because his master used to beat the crap out of him lol =P.. but I don't want to study Hapkido first unless I dont like the way the other two are being taught =) thanks again!
 

jks9199

Administrator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
22,940
Reaction score
3,245
Location
Northern VA
It might be smart to start by figuring out what's actually available in your area before you decide what to study... I mean, you might really want to study Upsy Daisy Do -- but if there's nobody around to teach it, you're rather SOL, no?
 
OP
P

PeteMc

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jan 29, 2010
Messages
24
Reaction score
1
Location
Illinois
Haha very true, but from what I have googled everything that I have listed *with the exception of Kenpo* is in my area... and I have some friends who do martial arts that can help me tell whether or not the schools are good or not or refer me to a good school. *although none of them take Kung Fu lol* My friend Mark told me that I want a school that encourages sparring, has a "fight" team, and instructors spar with the "higher ranking" students. So that is what I will be looking for when/if I sit in on a class or 2... Oh, and I am curious how long should a "good" class teach? 45 min? an hr? 2 hrs?
 
Last edited:

jks9199

Administrator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
22,940
Reaction score
3,245
Location
Northern VA
Haha very true, but from what I have googled everything that I have listed *with the exception of Kenpo* is in my area... and I have some friends who do martial arts that can help me tell whether or not the schools are good or not or refer me to a good school. *although none of them take Kung Fu lol* My friend Mark told me that I want a school that encourages sparring, has a "fight" team, and instructors spar with the "higher ranking" students. So that is what I will be looking for when/if I sit in on a class or 2... Oh, and I am curious how long should a "good" class teach? 45 min? an hr? 2 hrs?
But is it realistically available? Costs, travel, schedules... For example, training in Kendo would require a significant outlay for gear. Some schools cost hundreds of dollars a month; others may only cost a few dollars a class. If you're high school, you can't attend a class during school hours. If you don't have your own car, you depend on your parents's to drive you to the class -- which adds another limit.

Start by getting the details and visiting classes. Move on from there to deciding which one interests you. Class formats very greatly. I teach one class a week, for about two hours. Sometimes it's very physically demanding, other times it's doing one small thing for most of the class. Personally, I don't see how anyone teaches successfully in the 45 minute or hour classes; even if you assume students will do their own warm ups and conditioning -- that's often barely enough time for reviewing basics and introducing something new, then drilling it. When you visit, look at the way the class runs. Is it an atmosphere you think you would enjoy? Does the instructor teach -- or simply lead exercises? Do they break beginners out and work with them, or throw 'em in the mix and hope they pick up?

A little more on that last... I don't teach classes for separate skill levels, generally. Occasionally, there'll be special classes for advanced students or beginners -- usually on a different day -- but the norm is that all skill levels train together. New students are pulled aside after warm-ups for instruction, and participate with the class in as much as possible as they've learned some of the basics.
 
Last edited:

Stonecold

Orange Belt
Joined
Jan 28, 2009
Messages
69
Reaction score
3
Location
Ontario Canada
Welcome to the world of M A. Muay thai is a combat sport, it also translates well to the real world, is great for conditioning, it teaches the use of knees & elbows, sweeps & throws. This mixed with your wrestling will make you fairly well rounded.
Add some BJJ or Hapkido you have the whole package.
Good luck finding what you want.
You only results if you put in the time & sweat.
 
OP
P

PeteMc

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jan 29, 2010
Messages
24
Reaction score
1
Location
Illinois
But is it realistically available? Costs, travel, schedules... For example, training in Kendo would require a significant outlay for gear. Some schools cost hundreds of dollars a month; others may only cost a few dollars a class. If you're high school, you can't attend a class during school hours. If you don't have your own car, you depend on your parents's to drive you to the class -- which adds another limit.

Start by getting the details and visiting classes. Move on from there to deciding which one interests you. Class formats very greatly. I teach one class a week, for about two hours. Sometimes it's very physically demanding, other times it's doing one small thing for most of the class. Personally, I don't see how anyone teaches successfully in the 45 minute or hour classes; even if you assume students will do their own warm ups and conditioning -- that's often barely enough time for reviewing basics and introducing something new, then drilling it. When you visit, look at the way the class runs. Is it an atmosphere you think you would enjoy? Does the instructor teach -- or simply lead exercises? Do they break beginners out and work with them, or throw 'em in the mix and hope they pick up?

A little more on that last... I don't teach classes for separate skill levels, generally. Occasionally, there'll be special classes for advanced students or beginners -- usually on a different day -- but the norm is that all skill levels train together. New students are pulled aside after warm-ups for instruction, and participate with the class in as much as possible as they've learned some of the basics.

Thank you for your reply it will really help me with my decision on what type of martial art to take or if I can take them. A car is not a problem for me seeing as I have a license and my parents bought a car back in 2006 that works well and is pretty fuel effecient that I use to get to school, the gym, and work. My job only requires me to work from 5am-10am on saturday/sunday. Which is about 10hrs. a week making $8.25/hr. This won't interfere with my Martial Arts training... although it interferes with football lol. As for the times and length for the Jiu-Jitsu Classes it's from 5:30pm-6:30pm and for the Kung Fu classes it is 7:15pm-8:05pm. On the websites of both it doesn't tell me of any gear lol. The Hapkido classes are from 7-8pm. Again, not stating any gear. The Kung Fu classes are everyday besides Sunday. The JJ classes are the same and the Hapkido classes are Mon-Fri.
Does anyone know what gear I will need to purchase for these or is it strictly up to the school?

@Stonecold - Thanks for the reply as well and I have been thinking of BJJ and Muay Thai since the place I would go for either is the same lol
 

Blade96

Senior Master
Joined
Jan 17, 2010
Messages
2,042
Reaction score
38
Location
Newfoundland, Canada
btw never saw that post really....LOL @ Upsy Daisy Do!

had to mention it cause i found it really funny.

Hope you find a ma you like, Pete.
 

DBZ

Orange Belt
Joined
Mar 5, 2009
Messages
83
Reaction score
2
Location
Ohio
I like Kenpo, just my 2 cents. Good luck with whatever you choose
 
OP
P

PeteMc

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jan 29, 2010
Messages
24
Reaction score
1
Location
Illinois
Thanks to the both of you and I'd take Kenpo, but the nearest place to learn it is like 45-50 minutes
 

David43515

Master Black Belt
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
1,383
Reaction score
50
Location
Sapporo, Japan
What are you looking for out of your training? Do you want to compete as a sport? Are you interested in self defense? Just looking for a hobby or a way to stay in shape?

Those are important things to consider. And like you mentioned when you talked about your Dad`s classes, what kind of instructor do you enjoy being around? Some schools are very strict, almost military in thier format. Some are very relaxed like a big family. Most are somewhere in between. Just like no two football coaches are exactly alike, no two MA teachers will be either. You may find an art you like but hate the teacher.

One size doesn`t fit all.
 

David43515

Master Black Belt
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
1,383
Reaction score
50
Location
Sapporo, Japan
Kung Fu - I am thinking about Kung Fu because there are many different variations and a friend of mine said that it was too hard for him so now he does Karate


Brazillian Jiu-Jitsu - This is a type of Martial Arts referred to me from a friend of mine who does MMA he said it is the best for making an opponet submit quickly.

-Pete

Pete I`ve spent alot of years doing Kung Fu, Karate, and several other arts. I`ve tried BJJ as well. Kung Fu is more complex than Karate but no more difficult to learn. You just might not learn as fast because there`s more to learn if that makes sense. And what was hard for your friend might be easy for you Don`t seel yourself short.

Brazillian Jiu-Jitsu is a great sport and teaches alot of usefull skills if you can find a good school. But remember that when you submit someone....you have to let them go sooner or later. Grappling skills are an important part of anyone`s training, but outside of competition the fastest and safest way to submit anyone is a usually a KO punch.
 
OP
P

PeteMc

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jan 29, 2010
Messages
24
Reaction score
1
Location
Illinois
I am looking to compete as a sport and I also think it's a fun thing to do seeing my friends mma matches and stuff. But the teachers I want are to be more strict and have the art "perfected" and will spar with me LOL which is what I am hoping to see when I check out this kung fu school tomorrow and jiu jitsu school the next day.
Thanks
 

DBZ

Orange Belt
Joined
Mar 5, 2009
Messages
83
Reaction score
2
Location
Ohio
.....Brazillian Jiu-Jitsu is a great sport and teaches alot of usefull skills if you can find a good school. But remember that when you submit someone....you have to let them go sooner or later. .......

A VERY good point! self defense VS competition what are you really looking for
 

Blade96

Senior Master
Joined
Jan 17, 2010
Messages
2,042
Reaction score
38
Location
Newfoundland, Canada
Thanks to the both of you and I'd take Kenpo, but the nearest place to learn it is like 45-50 minutes

try kenpo....and then go for shotokan. LOL kidding! I'm just a little biased. Shotokan isnt for everyone. :)

What are you looking for out of your training? Do you want to compete as a sport? Are you interested in self defense? Just looking for a hobby or a way to stay in shape?

I ha always wanted to compete in a physical thing like a sport, ever since i was a teenager (well all my mom's family are athletic and they have medals and trophies up to here from basketball, cheerleadering, music, all kinds of arts and sports) I didnt even know I could compete in shotokan when i first started. But I did - Now I have my own gold medal when i got the highest marks with heian shodan, my kata. I didnt join shotokan to compete though. didnt even know about it at first. When i first learned i could though it was like, Oh my God! a chance to achieve the dream I'd always dreamed about!

david said:
Those are important things to consider. And like you mentioned when you talked about your Dad`s classes, what kind of instructor do you enjoy being around? Some schools are very strict, almost military in thier format. Some are very relaxed like a big family. Most are somewhere in between. Just like no two football coaches are exactly alike, no two MA teachers will be either. You may find an art you like but hate the teacher.

One size doesn`t fit all.

True enough. I got lucky with my shotokan school. I love the art of shotokan passionately - and the members of the dojo, all of them, very much. Our senseis are the relaxed types who will give you hugs a lot if they like you (they're always hugging me) and we are the 'big family' type of dojo. I didnt really have to even look for a good shotokan sensei - with me it just happened. Fate! :) Twas my destiny. =]

dont get me wrong though. They can be very strict. they will discipline you if you need it. i remember once when the students were chattering away during class and our sensei practically swore an oath saying words and yelling at them cause they werent doing what they were supposed to. and if you happen to be late and you dont bow and 'oss' and show the proper respect and wait to be allowed in, our Sempai will quickly set you straight. They are strict when they have to be. (and its funny that the black and brown belts are often the worst offenders.)

and as i said, they're obsessive about getting your techniques just right. If you aren't 'perfect' Sensei will make you do it over and over until you can satisfy him very particular But I like it. it also means he's fulfilling what funakoshi taught 'seek perfection of character' And thats what they teach us to do.
 
Last edited:

kaizasosei

Master Black Belt
Joined
Jan 7, 2007
Messages
1,180
Reaction score
24
Seems to me that you have a good plan or a good list. I personally would rather focus on aikido and taekwondo separately rather than go hapkido, but who knows, might be a shortcut. -I would not ignore judo, if you don't have any experience you need definately put that at the top of the list. Also, i think you don't need to wait long for practicing kickboxing.

Still, at some point, one of these styles may stick to you and define you more than the others. Kungfu is great, it is sometimes vague exactly what falls under the term kungfu, but nevertheless, it is still sortof like the mother of all martial arts, like shaolin...

j
 

arnuld

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jun 19, 2008
Messages
24
Reaction score
0
Location
INDIA
Hello all, this is my first of likely many posts and I figured i'd start by asking your opinoins on which martial arts I should do first. I have been researching some martial arts for a few weeks trying to figure out which one I wanted to do first, I say first because I am planning on, over the years, learning more than one type of martial arts.
..SNIP...

I whole-heartedly agree with what David43515 said. You need to ask yourself what is the purpose of your learning: getting belts and winning championships or self-defense (both are extremely opposite targets). I learn Martial-Arts for street fighting, no prizes, no love for black belt, just pure street fighting.


Pete, I think a beginner does the same mistake you are doing (I did it but corrected it before it went worse). Mistake is thinking that an art is superiors compared to others. There are no superior arts but only Masters who can teach you. Judo may look like a sport and if you get a highly-trained and fundamentally correct Master, he will teach you the things (deadly and spiritual) that majority of Judo practitioners don't even have any idea. Same for other arts. Earlier I used to think that Karate is just ring, with rules and stupid high kicking s**it and Krav-Maga, Kali, Shaolin Kung-Fu, Muay-Thai are the real arts for street fighting but then when I met different practitioners all I saw was poor teachings of those arts, they teach things that are totally useless on street (which defeated the purpose of my learning).

Guess what, now I am learning from a 3rd Dan Black Belt guy, Karate .. No. I am learning CTFS Creative and Tactical Fighting Systems, a kind of art designed by him for street fighting only. Why I am tellig you this, just to mak eyou know that you focus on finding a good Master rather than an art. No art is superior only the Master is.
 
Top