Atemi

Black Grass

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I have read that in Aikido ( Yoshinkan in particular) atemi is very important, if I remember right Gozo said that "Aikido is 70% atemi". However, I have never seen it being trained by Aikidoka was that ?

Vince
(non-aikidoka)
 

BlackCatBonz

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its all up to the teacher to teach it.
a friend of mine that studies aikido starts every technique with atemi....usually a backfist to the temple or the nose.
i think its just that it gets overlooked as something that is implied in the technique but is not actually practiced or defended against.
 

JAMJTX

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Yes, Shioda Sensei did say that 70% is striking.
I actually train in Doshinkan Aikido under Utada Sensei of Philadelphia. But we are IYAF affiliates. Doshinkan is Yoshinkan with additional weapons (basically).
We do a lot of atemi.

I originally trained in Aikido in the AAA - Toyoda Shihan's organization. My teacher said "Always atemi".

If you want to see more about Yoshinkan see www.doshinkan-aikido.org for information on the upcoming Inoue Kancho seminar.
 

Korppi76

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As said earlier it depends of Teacher. Many people seems to forget how to use them and some very good senseis use so minimal atemis that you dont necessaryly notice them (execpt when you are their uke ;))

My own teacher uses atemi to encourage uke to move. It's not always hit it might be also kick or elbow hit etc.

My earlier teacher didnt use atemi except when it was necessary.
 

BlackCatBonz

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i never realised that atemi was even used in aikido until i was working out with my friend one day. everytime i grabbed or hit him, i was getting popped on the noodle before getting dumped to the ground......it never had to be hard, but it was effective at off-balancing me. when he was uke, i noticed that when he threw a strike, his other hand always came up as block in front of his face in preparation for deflecting a strike and countering.
 

theletch1

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All in all atemi shouldn't be noticed much at all. As I've always seen it (and felt it as uke) atemi is simply a little something to take your mind off of where nage is trying to take you. It's used to help startle, redirect, stun. It's rare that atemi is ever the be all and end all of the interaction (at least in the dojo) between uke and nage. It is, indeed, important that the aikido-ka understand and use atemi.

The problem, as I see it, is that aikido is not really a good "first" art for most people. The art, in general, almost assumes that the practioner already has a good grasp of most basic strikes, grips and kicks. I see a lot of folks in my dojo that have prior training in an external style. Those that don't have any prior training are generally not at all comfortable being uke until they are up to speed and have a bit more trouble running technique because they don't understand the dynamics of the attack.
 

arnisador

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That's the impression I've gotten from those in Aikido--one shouldn't notice it much. It's a distraction or an impetus to begin moving in a certain direction.
 

138

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At times in our dojo, atemi is also shown as a way to end the confrontation (in extreme circumstances). A joint lock or manipulation puts uke in a vulnerable position, where nages strike will have a devaststing effect. Just my two cents...
 

theletch1

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138 said:
At times in our dojo, atemi is also shown as a way to end the confrontation (in extreme circumstances). A joint lock or manipulation puts uke in a vulnerable position, where nages strike will have a devaststing effect. Just my two cents...
I've seen and used atemi as a "finishing move" after take downs or used a knee to the face when having uke halfway down and it works well.
 

jujutsu_indonesia

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Most of the aikido dojo around here in Indones doesn't teach atemi seriously.

However I know of one dojo where the students and teachers spent like 8-16 minutes doing full-speed and full-power shomen uchi, yokomen uchi and mune tsuki together in line and in sync, just like in a karate dojo. These are accompanied with loud Kiai. The teacher said that this is a way to teach good form when attacking (as uke). Anybody else doing this kind of drills?
 

Aikikitty

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We're taught atemi in my dojo and are encouraged to use it. I pass up opportunities to use them all the time since I'm thinking so much of the technique that my sensei's have to remind me.

Sensei---"Robyn! Don't forget to atemi." :whip:

Me--- "Oh yeah!" :uhyeah:

Sensei---- :rolleyes:

Robyn :asian:
 
A

aikiwolf

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sometimes atemi is a strike by hand or foot
sometimes atemi is a strike with the mind.
If your will or intent is sudden and dominant enough to
unbalance the will of your attacker, that can also be an atemi.
Mastery and control of your attacker can often be on a psychological front.
I don't think it's the intent that is the deciding factor, but the ability to act on that intent, and to convey that by your presence alone.
...my 1/2 cent.:ultracool
 
T

TheBattousai

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I find that atemi is best used for breaking the concetration of the opponent. If your in the middle of a technique and they focus on stopping the movement, you strike them to cause a suki (a pause in the mind or better translated, a duh?), with this, you can continue the technique effectively. Thats just my opinion though.
 

Yari

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I find it hard to do the correct atemi.

It isn't at problem to stun a person, or to "unbalance a person. But how do you ensure that the response from the atemi is the one that you need for the technique your doing?

Most styls of Aikido have atemi in the flow of the technique, which means that they expect that the atemi contemplates the technique. But how are you sure that it does? Do you ever try it?

I have to agree on an earlier post stating that people that havn't had previous MA training (an at a certain level), is important. Not impossible, just imporatant for the concept of atemi. Because you have to know how uke will react to the Atemi. 2 cm (about an inch) is enough to get totaly different responses.

/yari
 

theletch1

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Yari said:
I find it hard to do the correct atemi.

It isn't at problem to stun a person, or to "unbalance a person. But how do you ensure that the response from the atemi is the one that you need for the technique your doing?

Most styls of Aikido have atemi in the flow of the technique, which means that they expect that the atemi contemplates the technique. But how are you sure that it does? Do you ever try it?

I have to agree on an earlier post stating that people that havn't had previous MA training (an at a certain level), is important. Not impossible, just imporatant for the concept of atemi. Because you have to know how uke will react to the Atemi. 2 cm (about an inch) is enough to get totaly different responses.

/yari
As usual, I find myself agreeing with you, Yari. Knowing how uke will react to the atemi is almost as important as knowing how to do the atemi in the first place. If I strike uke in point A then he'll move in such and such a direction and that will open up or begin technique B. If I am going to use a certain atemi I have to have a technique in mind that will continue ukes' movement once he reacts to the atemi and not one that requires me to move in the opposite direction of his reaction. What I find frustrating is using atemi in class that is so light that you can't get a good reaction from uke. He/she NEEDS to feel the strike enough to give you a legitimate reaction to know how the strike will either compliment the technique or hinder it. NGA is a rough and tumble style of aikido but even with that most aikido-ka don't really expect to go home with a few bruises. As for me, nothing makes me happier than getting up the morning after class and being sore.
 

Yari

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theletch1 said:
. As for me, nothing makes me happier than getting up the morning after class and being sore.

I can positivly (sp?) relate to that. I love feeling that I've really done something....

/yari
 

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